OS2 World.Com Forum

Subject  :  ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  OriAl alanh77@comcast.net
Date  :  04 Feb, 2007 on 02:07
My friend tried to install an ATI Radeon 256M video card (I had a Matrox G450.) I use the SciTech drivers for eCS, v 3.1.8. I have a Kensington Expert Mouse 5.0 trackball using the Kensington OS/2 driver (from 1995 - that's the latest.) He installed the card, booted up eCS 1.2r, and there was no problem with video, but the mouse didn't work. Tried to REM out the Kensington driver and replace it with mouse.sys - same problem.

Airboot 1.04 also didn't like the Radeon card. Booting with Airboot installed resulted in Airboot saying there was a problem with my disk, and halted the system.

Putting the Matrox back in resolved both problems - Airboot worked as usual, and so did the mouse. So, what must I do enable my Expert Mouse and Airboot to co-exist with the ATI Radeon card? My poor friend was here for five hours today fighting with my system (which also will not accept additional memory on my ABit KX7-333 motherboard - I want to go from 512 Meg to 1.5 Gig, but nothing happens with additional memory added, or even with a 1 gig stick alone, and the motherboard manual says it should handle those amounts..)

Thanks,


Alan

Nerve Center BBS tncbbs.no-ip.com FidoNet 1:261/1000


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  obiwan
Date  :  05 Feb, 2007 on 19:12
Try disabling "USB legacy support" in the BIOS.

Also see if you can set the IRQ's so no devices use the same IRQ - or at least none of the devices in question. If you can disable the IRQ on the video it's one less to worry about.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  El Vato
Date  :  05 Feb, 2007 on 19:21

OriAl (04 Feb, 2007 02:07):
My friend tried to install an ATI Radeon 256M video card (I had a Matrox G450.) I use the SciTech drivers for eCS, v 3.1.8. I have a Kensington Expert Mouse 5.0 trackball using the Kensington OS/2 driver (from 1995 - that's the latest.) He installed the card, booted up eCS 1.2r, and there was no problem with video, but the mouse didn't work. Tried to REM out the Kensington driver and replace it with mouse.sys - same problem.

You may want to reference the SNAP faq:

"For maximum performance, the SciTech drivers use an interrupt driven mouse cursor. In some cases the interrupt driven mouse cursor may interfere with serial communications. If you wish to disable this feature, you can do so by adding the following line to Config.Sys:

SET SDD_INTCURSOR_DISABLE=Y

This setting will not take affect until after you reboot. Note that the value of the environment variable has no effect, as the interrupt mouse cursor feature will always be disabled when the variable is present."
< http://www.scitechsoft.com/support/faq/fom.cgi?_recurse=1&=&file=2#file_12 >

...i.e., your mouse cursor might be interrupting other than serial communications.

Additionally, you might play with a more recent/different mouse driver that may claim different resources, for example the IBM's SMOUSE.EXE from 2004 and Kesington Expert Mouse from 1996. You can find it on < http://www.os2site.com/sw/drivers/mouse/index.html >. Take a look around the site for a potentially more appropriate mouse replacement. SMOUSE.EXE used to be available from the IBM's device driver pack online but apparently no more.


OriAl (04 Feb, 2007 02:07):
Airboot 1.04 also didn't like the Radeon card. Booting with Airboot installed resulted in Airboot saying there was a problem with my disk, and halted the system.

Is there anything wrong with the built in LVM Boot Manager You might want to try disabling Airboot and (re)installing your LVM Boot Manager --analyze the subsequent system behaviour.


OriAl (04 Feb, 2007 02:07):
Putting the Matrox back in resolved both problems - Airboot worked as usual, and so did the mouse. So, what must I do enable my Expert Mouse and Airboot to co-exist with the ATI Radeon card? My poor friend was here for five hours today fighting with my system (which also will not accept additional memory on my ABit KX7-333 motherboard - I want to go from 512 Meg to 1.5 Gig, but nothing happens with additional memory added, or even with a 1 gig stick alone, and the motherboard manual says it should handle those amounts..)
Thanks,

You may want to verify that your memory has the appropriate specs for your motherboard and that it is from a reputable vendor, first of all. As an example, some 1995 motheboards would boot without initial issues with 4k refresh rate memory modules --but would not recognize ALL the memory that the manufacturer labeled. Is your motherboard BIOS up to date

If in doubt (about your memory) and want to verify it in an alternative manner, buy/download a bootable media/image of SuSE Linux 10.X ( OpenSuSE:< http://en.opensuse.org/Download >) and boot your system with the media accordingly. Proceed to perform a memory test from the ensuing menu

Were you to allow the SuSE media to continue by selecting "Installation" instead from the initial menu, it WILL NOT touch/modify any of your currently existing data IF you press the "Abort" button once you come to the "Installation Settings" screen; it has the tabs of "Overview" and "Expert" at the top.

Accordingly, you might want to get to that point to verify independently what the amount of RAM is detected by another powerful operating system. See the VPC/2 allocated amount under "System", for instance.

Most importantly, focus in a single aspect of your problems and analyze from different perspectives the outcome of a given procedure, making --if possible-- a single change at a time.

Best of luck !


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  The Warper
Date  :  05 Feb, 2007 on 23:34
If I remember, there was such a memory issue with some older kernel versions (> 512 MB). You may want to update your kernel, if this is your case.

As for the Kensington mouse, you should look for a file in the SNAP folder called PROBLEMS.TXT (or something like), where I remember there was some report (and possibly a solution?) for this very Kensington issue.

Hope this can help.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  cyberspittle cyberspittle@yahoo.com
Date  :  06 Feb, 2007 on 03:47
1st turn off any resources not used in the BIOS. If you are using an ethernet card (to DSL, etc), turn off serial ports, likewise, if you are are using USB for printing, turn off your parallel ports too. Etc.

Another option to go with (if yourealy must keep your motherboard) is a BIOS update. Mr. BIOS has them for older mobos. Best wishes for a speedy (warped) recovery.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  OriAl alanh77@comcast.net
Date  :  06 Feb, 2007 on 23:32
Thanks for all the ideas. I'm using a parallel printer, so I can't turn that off. I'm not using any serial ports at present, but I am using virtual serial ports via Vmodem from the SIO package - will that be affected if serial ports are disabled in BIOS? No USB at present.. My kernel is 14.103a, which shouldn't have a problem with memory above 512 Meg.

How do I turn off video irq?

I looked at a couple of other mouse drivers, but none mentioned Kensington in their docs, and I need to be able to program the upper buttons of the Expert Mouse, which the Kensington driver allows..

LVM boot manager - can that be installed at the end of my master drive, and how is that done?

On another note, I have Ubuntu Linux on my slave drive, as I want to look at it, but I haven't been able to boot to it. It's in Airboot's menu,.and there's a Grub boot partition on the slave, with the rest of the 20 gig for Ubuntu, but I can't get it to boot. I even set the Grub parrtition as Startable with DFSEE - no joy.

---
Alan

Nerve Center BBS tncbbs.no-ip.com FidoNet 1:261/1000


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  El Vato
Date  :  07 Feb, 2007 on 00:32

OriAl (06 Feb, 2007 23:32):
Thanks for all the ideas. I'm using a parallel printer, so I can't turn that off. I'm not using any serial ports at present, but I am using virtual serial ports via Vmodem from the SIO package - [...]

Suggestion, before you become more involved: modify your CONFIG.SYS as suggested by the SNAP faq; open a windowed OS/2 command prompt and type:

COPY CONFIG.SYS CONFIG.SYSBKUP

after the file is copied successfully, proceedt to modify your CONFIG.SYS. Again at the command prompt type:

E CONFIG.SYS

and just before the last line of your CONFIG.SYS insert the statement:

SET SDD_INTCURSOR_DISABLE=Y

Save your changes to your CONFIG.SYS and close your E editor. Reboot your machine to verify that it is bootable.

If your machine can boot and you can move your mouse pointer, proceed to shut down and reinstall your newer video card. Reboot and post your results, please.


OriAl (06 Feb, 2007 23:32):
[...]

I looked at a couple of other mouse drivers, but none mentioned Kensington in their docs, and I need to be able to program the upper buttons of the Expert Mouse, which the Kensington driver allows..


Did you scroll down the page (< http://www.os2site.com/sw/drivers/mouse/index.html >)to search for the Kesington Expert Mouse

...could this be it: < http://www.os2site.com/sw/drivers/mouse/kensington_422.zip >


OriAl (06 Feb, 2007 23:32):
LVM boot manager - can that be installed at the end of my master drive, and how is that done?

On another note, I have Ubuntu Linux on my slave drive, as I want to look at it, but I haven't been able to boot to it. It's in Airboot's menu,.and there's a Grub boot partition on the slave, with the rest of the 20 gig for Ubuntu, but I can't get it to boot. I even set the Grub parrtition as Startable with DFSEE - no joy.


It can be done --but first try the above. I am glad that you prefer the Coolness of the Penguin over WinXX.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  obiwan
Date  :  08 Feb, 2007 on 02:18

OriAl (06 Feb, 2007 23:32):
No USB at present..

Even if you do not use USB devices, the "USB legacy support" option in the BIOS (if present) can affect the way PS/2 mice are recognized. So experimenting with the option is worthwhile.


How do I turn off video irq?

It would be an option in the BIOS. Like USB legacy support, it may or may not be there.

A handy pci utility found on Hobbes can be used to inspect pci devices. The very end of its output gives a summary of IRQ's, and will tell you explicitly if any are being shared. It isn't necessarily a problem if they are, but it can be a source of unpredictability, and sometimes behavior consistent with what you described. So it is adviseable with OS/2 to assign only one device to any given IRQ.



LVM boot manager - can that be installed at the end of my master drive, and how is that done?

It might not be possible. I have had trouble trying to create bootable primary partitions at the end of a drive. You can try it by going to the Logical Volume Manager in the System Setup folder object. The boot manager must be the "Active" aka "Startable" partition.


On another note, I have Ubuntu Linux on my slave drive, as I want to look at it, but I haven't been able to boot to it. It's in Airboot's menu,.and there's a Grub boot partition on the slave, with the rest of the 20 gig for Ubuntu, but I can't get it to boot. I even set the Grub parrtition as Startable with DFSEE - no joy.

Installation of Grub and the LVM boot manager have been covered in these threads:

http://www.os2world.com/cgi-bin/ultraboard/UltraBoard.cgi?action=Read&BID=62&TID=1283
http://www.os2world.com/cgi-bin/ultraboard/UltraBoard.cgi?action=Read&BID=62&TID=1366

It would seem that Grub is not properly installed on that boot partition. The fact that it is a boot partition and there are Grub binaries does not make it bootable. Grub has to install itself in the boot sector of the partition, and of course its configuration, with the kernel parameters, must be right. If the Ubuntu installer does not make it easy to make that partition bootable (I have not seen it - but I probably should) you will have to read the Grub documentation to familiarize yourself with the way it identifies drives. Installing it on the boot sector is a matter of two commands at the grub prompt: root and setup. But you want to specify the drive numbers correctly, or you could mess up other drives' boot sectors or AirBoot.

Note also that if this drive was in a different controller position when Ubuntu was installed, it is likely that the grub.conf and /etc/fstab need correction.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  El Vato
Date  :  08 Feb, 2007 on 19:04

obiwan (08 Feb, 2007 02:1:

OriAl (06 Feb, 2007 23:32):
No USB at present..

[...]



LVM boot manager - can that be installed at the end of my master drive, and how is that done?

It might not be possible. I have had trouble trying to create bootable primary partitions at the end of a drive. You can try it by going to the Logical Volume Manager in the System Setup folder object. The boot manager must be the "Active" aka "Startable" partition.
[...]


Assuming that you are using the latest LVM support, i.e., the WsEB grade, and not the Merlin hack that I suggested elsewhere, you should be able to install LVM enabled Boot Manager at the end of your hard drive --provided that:

1) You observe the 4 primary partition limit on each hard drive &

2) That there is NO free space until the end of your hard drive.

By default, the LVM-enabled Boot Manager will install on the first free space that it encounters in your hard drive.
And by default, it will create a primary partition when you select the "Create" option from the menu in the LVM logical view interface.

Accordingly, in a virgin hard disk, you would boot from your bootable CDROM and/or bootable diskette set (with an additional one for LVM related stuff) and after pressing F3 (and inserting the diskette with LVM files if not using bootable CD), you would go into an OS/2 command prompt. There you would type:

LVM.EXE /SI:FS/SIZE:120

The LVM interface will pop up and the dialog will confirm that you should create an installable (for OS/2) partition of at least 120MB.

Alternatively, simply entering at the command prompt:

LVM.EXE

Will not prompt you for an (OS/2) installable partition and will simply take you into the LVM utility.

Please note that if you get a response about the LVM.EXE command not being found, you would need to change directory to your bootable OS/2 (a.k.a eCS) media appropriate location. Under WsEB it would be:

X:/os2image/disk_6

where, naturally, you replace X by your actual CDROM drive letter. If youd decide to boot your system with bootable floppy set, then copy from your system the following files to make an additional LVM diskette that you can use:

vcu.msg
vcu.exe
oso001.msg
lvm.dll
lvm.exe
lvm.msg
lvmh.msg

Assuming that you wanted to install LVM-enabled BM at the end of your hard disk, you would "fool" Boot Manager thus:

Press F5 to go into the physical partition layout interface, select (by highlighting it from the upper portion of the screen) your hard disk that you want to partition; it should be your virgin hard disk, of course. Press ENTER.

You will be taken to the raw hard drive, press enter to create a partition --primary or logical-- that covers your whole hard disk except the last 15 MB at the end of your hard disk. Leave those 15MB as free space, i.e. DO NOT specifically create a primary partition for the LVM-enabled BM.

After your partition is created, press F5 again to return to the Logical View. From the menu select "Install Boot Manager" and you are done --LVM-enabled BM will be (essentially) at the end of your hard disk. Subsequently you might delete the created "dummy" partition and re-create your desired partition configuration.

Note that I referenced a virgin hard drive. On the other hand, for a hard drive that has been partitioned with WinXX and Linux, you will run into problems; those vary depending on how "crapped" those hard drives have been left. Hence, the solution is to do ALL your partitioning from your LVM-enabled BM in order not to introduce inconsistencies.

If you have previous WinXX and Linux partitions, one solution is to back up the data in those (previous) partitions and NOTE in what order those partitons were layed out. Proceed to remove the partitions with the operating system that created them. You can use a Linux bootable CD to remove WinXX as well as Linux ones BECAUSE LVM-enabled BM will NOT be able to remove them. Often the LVM interface will remove them --but only apparently--- because after you reboot the foreign partitions will still be there. That can be verified by entering into the LVM utility once more.

Subsequently recreate those partitions with the LVM-enabled Boot Manager and restore your data.

Hope the info will help you be successful in your endeavor !

P.S. If by accident and/or on purpose you have allowed Linux to install GRUB into the master boot record you will have to use the Linux utility to remove it from there if you experience persistent and/or unexplained partition/bootable problems under OS/2 LVM.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  OriAl alanh77@comcast.net
Date  :  08 Feb, 2007 on 23:59
Until my friend has a chance to drop by again, it's no use to make any config.sys changes with regard to SNAP and the mouse, as I won't be able to test if the changes solve the issue with the trackball, as he does the hardware installations for me (I'm quadriplegic.)

OS2_422..zip is the last OS/2 Expert Mouse drivers released by Kensington, and they are the ones I'm using (they allow programming the second set of buttons.) Would Amouse allow programming of those buttons? If so, I could replace the Kensington driver with it.

My master drive is a 120 gig with two eCS boot partitions, one WinXP partition (10 gig), seven 2 gig HPFS partitions (relics of my original introduction to OS/2, when there was a 2 gig limit, plus I use several.old OS/2, Dos, and Win-OS/2 utilities that barf at larger partition sizes), ttwo 20 gig HPFS partiitions, and 40 gig free space (I really don't do that much with the machine - don't play games, don't download binaries or music.) Is there a way to install LVM boot manager at the beginning of the drive without destroying my first boot partition , perhaps jsing DFSEE?

My Ubuntu Linux is on the slave drive, and Airboot finds it, but Grub doesn't respond (undoubtedly due to the fact that the first time I tried to install Ubuntu, it stuck Grub on my ,master drive, though I told the installer to install on the slave, and it killed my eCS and Win on the master. I later installed i it on the second drive with the first one disconnected. Is there a way to edit Grub to tell it that it is on the slave?

Please realize that though I may sound like I know what I 'm doing, I really am not that knowledgeable. All help is greatly appreciated.

---
Alan

Nerve Center BBS tncbbs.no-ip.com FidoNet 1:261/1000


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  Gregg
Date  :  09 Feb, 2007 on 01:22
I just checked the amouse news group. The Kensington expert mouse works with it but buttons 3 & 4 are nonstandard so they do not work.

DFSee should be able to shrink the first partition to allow you to add boot manager.

I think I remember reading somewhere that the memory on video cards could conflict with the virtual address space if it was set too high. Try setting VIRTUALADDRESSLIMIT= to either 1536 or 1024 in config.sys and see if it helps.

Gregg


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  obiwan
Date  :  09 Feb, 2007 on 02:52

OriAl (08 Feb, 2007 23:59):
My master drive is a 120 gig with two eCS boot partitions, one WinXP partition (10 gig), seven 2 gig HPFS partitions (relics of my original introduction to OS/2, when there was a 2 gig limit, plus I use several.old OS/2, Dos, and Win-OS/2 utilities that barf at larger partition sizes), ttwo 20 gig HPFS partiitions, and 40 gig free space (I really don't do that much with the machine - don't play games, don't download binaries or music.) Is there a way to install LVM boot manager at the beginning of the drive without destroying my first boot partition , perhaps jsing DFSEE?

In my opinion, on a drive with this much history, if AirBoot is working for you, don't bother expending work to install LVM boot manager. I fail to see any advantage, it may or may not work, it will take time and effort, and attempting to resize partitions may end up breaking things.



My Ubuntu Linux is on the slave drive, and Airboot finds it, but Grub doesn't respond (undoubtedly due to the fact that the first time I tried to install Ubuntu, it stuck Grub on my ,master drive, though I told the installer to install on the slave, and it killed my eCS and Win on the master. I later installed i it on the second drive with the first one disconnected. Is there a way to edit Grub to tell it that it is on the slave?

Grub most certainly can be corrected. Like I say the trick is just getting the drive numbers correct.

I just perused the Ubuntu forums to see if this is addressed there, and am disappointed to learn that the installer always puts Grub on the primary master drive's MBR, making a setup like this troublesome.

I would need more details about your partition setup, and the text of your /boot/grub/menu.lst file and /etc/fstab to give you specific help here. To access it you are going to have to get to a shell prompt from the Ubuntu CD, which I don't yet know how to do. Perhaps later I can find some more Ubuntu-specific details to give you specific instructions on how to fix it.

In any case, I would humbly suggest moving the Grub issue to a separate thread, either a new one or one I cited earlier, as it involves a number of technical details unrelated to the mouse and video issues that would make this one less tidy and harder to follow.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  El Vato
Date  :  09 Feb, 2007 on 15:25

obiwan (09 Feb, 2007 02:52):

OriAl (08 Feb, 2007 23:59):
My master drive is a 120 gig with two eCS boot partitions, one WinXP partition (10 gig), seven 2 gig HPFS partitions (relics of my original introduction to OS/2, when there was a 2 gig limit, plus I use several.old OS/2, Dos, and Win-OS/2 utilities that barf at larger partition sizes), ttwo 20 gig HPFS partiitions, and 40 gig free space (I really don't do that much with the machine - don't play games, don't download binaries or music.) Is there a way to install LVM boot manager at the beginning of the drive without destroying my first boot partition , perhaps jsing DFSEE?

In my opinion, on a drive with this much history, if AirBoot is working for you, don't bother expending work to install LVM boot manager. I fail to see any advantage, it may or may not work, it will take time and effort, and attempting to resize partitions may end up breaking things.


AirBoot has some (unresolved ) quirks as is evident from the following thread of "experts" : < http://sysadminforum.com/t7299.html >

As a side note, having experienced an similar problem as the author of the original thread posted in the referenced link above, I resolved it by removing the /CACHE:XXXX option from the CONFIG.SYS FAT32 driver.

Hence, my original CONFIG.SYS line read:

IFS=F:\OS2\FAT32.IFS /CACHE:XXXX

and edited it to look like:

IFS=F:\OS2\FAT32.IFS

where, of course, the F: drive above is replaced by OriAl with his actual OS/2 specific boot drive(s). And the XXXX simply represent a default cache amount number.

As a matter of fact, these modifications should be tried by OriAl also. This change will attempt to resolve the issue about AirBoot complaining about the hard disk after the ATI card is reinstalled. I am assuming, naturally, that OriAl has the FAT32 support.

Most importantly, when OriAl's friend comes around to do the hardware upgrade, it is necessary to remember --PRIOR to the last OS/2 shutdown-- to set the "Detection Level" of his "Hardware manager" object to "Full hardware detection" on the next reboot.

Notwithstanding, if the above procedure (in combination with my original suggestion in my second post) does not work, the reinstallation of the LVM enabled Boot Manager might be necessary (as it was for one of the participants in the thread link referenced priorly).

What I described in my third post is an extreme and does not necessariy imply that most (if not all) of OriAl partitions would not be able to be added successfully to LVM-enabled Boot Manager in a normal way --i.e., without resorting to recreation/resizing of his hard disk.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  OriAl alanh77@comcast.net
Date  :  09 Feb, 2007 on 21:40
Just a quick reply - I don't have the FAT32 driver installed. Virtualaddresslimt is set at 2048, so I can try changing that.

Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  OriAl alanh77@comcast.net
Date  :  09 Feb, 2007 on 23:00
Update - I found the setting to disable Video Irq in bios, and did so, and bootup was fine. There's also an option to disable USB Irq - should I do that as well? I currently have no USB devices, but that will change.

I could free one or two more irqs by disabling serial ports in the bios. Currently, both are enabled, though I'm not using any serial devices at this time. I am using two virtual Vmodem ports. If I disable both ports in bios, and remove their settings from the sio.sys line in config.sys, will the Vmodem ports still function, or must at least one real serial port exist to have virtual ports?

Pci.exe reported that four devices shared irq 11. This was before I disabled video irq in bios.

Airboot web page (http://ecomstation.ru) says it has Linux Kernel support from Fat16 partition.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  El Vato
Date  :  10 Feb, 2007 on 16:07
...one of the reasons (main ) that manufacturers hide most of those settings is because of the potential for inaccurate configurations rendering the machines useless.

If you are trying to solve a video/mouse problem first --AND you do not have the video card in place-- why do you want to mess with those settings There is no standard way that manufacturers set their hardware/software.

Consequently, each individual case is different and an integrator often works by an inductive/deductive approach --not by randomly enabling/disabling BIOS machine settings without being able to test whether the outcome resulted in an improvement of the problem under consideration (video/mouse --in your case).

Suggestion: try the CONFIG.SYS modifications first, one at a time BEFORE you start messing at the hardware level.

Best regards.


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  OriAl alanh77@comcast.net
Date  :  10 Feb, 2007 on 20:54
I understand your point about trying hardware changes last. It certainly makes sense.

Do you want me to try the config.sys changes with the Matrox card in, as it currently is? Mouse works properly now, so am I looking to see if it doesn't work with a certain config.sys entry? Or is your suggestion that I try the config.sys changes one at a time next time my friend is here and tries to install the Radeon card? I'm not trying to be argumentative here, so please don't lose patience with me.

A note on the memory issue - I got a suggestion via email saying I should check if the bios has a setting that tells it to automatically recognize new memory amounts. I saw nothing like that, but I did see a setting for "Force ESCD (or ECSD) Update, and that was disabled. Should that be enabled when memory is added? Note that the problem we're having isn't related to the OS/2 kernel - when memory is added, or the two 256 Meg stick are replaced by the 1 Gig stick, we get nothing when we try to boot, only a black screen. To this limited-knowledge person, this sounds like a bios or motherboard issue - do you concur?

The Abit KX7-333 motherboard manual was no help - it tells max amounts of memory the board will support, and what memory speeds, but nothing else. Maybe I just need a new motherboard - I'm not a gamer, so I have no need to upgrade my Athlon XP 2600+ CPU or PC2700 memory, thus I have no need for the latest and greatest, or anything close.

---
Alan

Nerve Center BBS tncbbs.no-ip.com FidoNet 1:261/1000


Subject  :  Re:ATI Radeon and Kensington (and Airboot, also!)
Author  :  El Vato
Date  :  16 Feb, 2007 on 06:22

OriAl (10 Feb, 2007 20:54):
I understand your point about trying hardware changes last. It certainly makes sense.

Do you want me to try the config.sys changes with the Matrox card in, as it currently is? Mouse works properly now, so am I looking to see if it doesn't work with a certain config.sys entry? Or is your suggestion that I try the config.sys changes one at a time next time my friend is here and tries to install the Radeon card? [...]


My apologies, OriAl. Notwithstanding I believe that I have already explained how to proceed --from my perspective, of course-- in post number 7. If your editing of your CONFIG.SYS results in success, then your next procedure to solve the video/mouse problem depends on whether your video card installation does not mess your mouse anymore. Again, as explained in post #13:

Most importantly, when OriAl's friend comes around to do the hardware upgrade, it is necessary to remember --PRIOR to the last OS/2 shutdown-- to set the "Detection Level" of his "Hardware manager" object to "Full hardware detection" on the next reboot.


OriAl (10 Feb, 2007 20:54):
A note on the memory issue - I got a suggestion via email saying I should check if the bios has a setting that tells it to automatically recognize new memory amounts. I saw nothing like that, but I did see a setting for "Force ESCD (or ECSD) Update, and that was disabled. Should that be enabled when memory is added? Note that the problem we're having isn't related to the OS/2 kernel - when memory is added, or the two 256 Meg stick are replaced by the 1 Gig stick, we get nothing when we try to boot, only a black screen. To this limited-knowledge person, this sounds like a bios or motherboard issue - do you concur?

The Abit KX7-333 motherboard manual was no help - it tells max amounts of memory the board will support, and what memory speeds, but nothing else. Maybe I just need a new motherboard - I'm not a gamer, so I have no need to upgrade my Athlon XP 2600+ CPU or PC2700 memory, thus I have no need for the latest and greatest, or anything close.


Yes, I know that your newer OS/2 should not have the memory limitation of older kernels. Notwithstanding, consider the following carefully, especially if this is your first memory upgrade:

Even if your manual mentions a Max of memory, it does not necessarily mean that you can insert arbitrary amounts into each memory bank.

Some memory is to be added in pairs of sticks NOT exceeding an individual memory bank capacity in your motherboard.

Consequently, and I feel as if I am repeating things, the memory specifications/capacity noted in your manual should apply to the memory sticks you are trying to add.

If you do not observe the guidelines in your manual, it does not imply that it is of no help --it simply means that you are projecting your assumptions over the physical constraints of your motherboard.

Additionally, reread the manual. Each memory bank has a capacity that you should not exceed and you may need to add memory in pairs (of sticks). In other words, adding only one stick to a memory bank and/or adding one memory stick of say 500MB (for instance) paired with another 1GB into sister memory banks will simply not be acceptable to the hardware.

Best of luck !


Powered by UltraBoard 2000 <www.ub2k.com>