Home | Gallery | Forum | Services | Webmail | Archive | Links | Contact Us | About Us
OS2 World.Com Forum
OS2 World.Com Online Discussion Forum.
Index / OS/2 - General / Setup & Installation
author message
Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Post a new topic Reply to this Topic Printable Version of this Topic Forward this Topic to your Friend Topic Commands (for administrator or moderators only)
Blonde Guy
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this memberhttp://www.blondeguy.com
posts: 46
since: 12 Apr, 2004
21. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
You know, I installed WinXP and eCS and I really didn't have any problems. eCS is on a logical, WinXP is on a primary, and boot manager is installed between them.

Here is the trick. There are only 4 primary paritions on a hard drive.

I don't think it matters if WinXP is first or eCS or boot manager. But remember that boot manager takes a primary, and WinXP takes a primary, and the extended partition takes a primary. My computer has a recovery partition that takes another primary, so all 4 primary partitions are all used up.

I think most of the installation problems happen to people who can't count to 4 properly.

I did learn to exit boot.ini on Windows, though, in case I accidently made Windows unbootable.

---
Expert Consulting for OS/2 and eComStation

Date: 09 Mar, 2007 on 04:27
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
22. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
Ok. Edm/2 (www.edm2.com) is Wiki. So, anybody can add or correct things in an article. He/she must be registered first.

---
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.
Date: 09 Mar, 2007 on 10:03
El Vato
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this memberhttp://www.metztli-it.com
posts: 113
since: 04 Oct, 2006
23. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 10 Mar, 2007 08:07 (1 times)

aasdelat (08 Mar, 2007 10:34):


Once you have your bootable diskette media ready, insert it into your floppy device and reboot your machine if necessary. Once the floppy media takes you into a command prompt, remove the MBR of your hard disk as follows:

FDISK /MBR

and your Master Boot Record is erased.



[...]So, I erased all partitions with "qtpared" from a bootable linux CD (I used guadalinex distribution, based on debian). This time I got no new complains from BM and since then, I only use BM to touch partitions.

...it is evident that the lesson learned here is that (usually) whatever (partition) WinXX touches turns to crap.

On the other hand, there are exceptions to the rule. I have installed OS/2 in laptops (IBM, Sony, Dell) where WinXX was preinstalled or, in the case of some newer IBM ThinkPads, there was an recovery image in a hidden partition.

Interestingly, in some of the above instances, it is not necessary to remove the WinXX partition; it suffices to merely resize it with an NTFS capable resizing utility and LVM-enabled BM will not complain. You got one of those odd rough instances. Good that you now only use your LVM BM to do further slices in your hard drive(s)! And better yet that you have an open perspective since you value the power of Linux to clean the leftover WinXX crap.
[...]


aasdelat (08 Mar, 2007 10:34):
I can do this on a NTFS file system using the WinXP bootable CD.

In some situations, like when WinXX comes preinstalled, you do not have that option. Additionally, when there is a recovery partition and the image there is expanded into a primary partition, the initial phase is (usually) done in FAT32; and it is not until the end of the WinXX installation that the recovery utility uses the WinXX system CONVERT command to turn the FAT32 into NTFS.

Consequently, even if one has the WinXX bootable media, the administrator password may not be known --yes, I know, there are admin password crackers out there. Notwithstanding, whenever possible simply formatting the WinXX partition as FAT32 will allow writing access from an Linux and/or OS/2 bootable media --at least until you are done setting up your multi-boot system in your machine.

Finally, there is some add on software for writing NTFS file systems from within Linux but at the moment it is not very friendly nor intuitive --another pro argument for initial FAT32 formatting for those who will install WinXX first.


aasdelat (08 Mar, 2007 10:34):
And that's all (by now). I still have to install OS/2 and linux, but with BM not complainig any more, this will be very easy.

A couple of pointers, if I may suggest. Red Hat Fedora 6 by default will not read/write your HPFS partitions. Debian and Novell's Linux OpenSuSE and/or SuSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) do not have Fedora's HPFS initial handicap.

By default each of the Linux operating systems above will suggest 3 partitions --and the SWAP partition; each partition will be done without regard for OS/2's BM interpretation of LVM and ...you will be in trouble if you allow it to happen. The Linux implementation of LVM is slightly different than that of OS/2's.

Accordingly, from your OS/2 LVM-enbled utility plan and implement the creation of at least 2 logical partitions: your root partition and your SWAP file; the latter (SWAP) should be at least equal to your installed amount of RAM. Performancewise, the SWAP should ideally be created in a second hard drive --if you have that option, of course.

Alternatively, you might create three(3) logical partitions: 100MB (/boot) partition, a root (/) partition, and your SWAP partition --all from the OS/2 LVM utility. Enable the boot partition as bootable if you implement this latter suggestion. Otherwise enable the root partiton as bootable.

Note that you may need to deallocate the drive letter of your Linux bootable partitions. As with the WinXX partitioning issues, deallocation of the Linux drive letters from within OS/2's LVM is not strictly necessary but keep that option ready in case of problems.

Pay particular attention to where you install the Linux GRUB booting utility. By default it will be installed on the MBR of your hard disk and (ugh!) if you have your OS/2 LVM-enabled BM there it will get beaten badly by the Penguin.

If you do not have sufficient experience with Linux but feel that you do not need the WinXX-like patronizing of any version of Ubuntu, you may want to use either OpenSuSE (unsupported) and/or SuSE Linux Enterprise Desktop ($50.00 support subscription per year).

The latter(s) provide an intuitive graphical user interface that will allow you flexibility not existing in Ubuntu; yet, that flexibility will not overwhelm you with copious technicalities like Debian.

Now for the (A)XGL stuff. Fedora 6 and (supported) SLED support it "out of the box."The other Linux Distros require some tweaking but... it is worth it -- I took this Java snapshot from within OS/2 peeking into SLED. As you can see WinXX is simply a guest application on Linux. It is evident that to halt predatory proprietary software, it is necessary to match each of its predatory and closed attributes with open standards free equivalents of superb quality !

[...]

Date: 09 Mar, 2007 on 20:23
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
24. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 15 Mar, 2007 14:04 (1 times)
Thank you for your valuable advices.
eCs is now installed. Now goes Linux.
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.
Date: 14 Mar, 2007 on 16:33
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
25. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
Please, can you help me with this issue?:
I've installed Linux (guadalinex, based on Ubuntu). I created with BM two logical drives in the extended partition: one of them is 20 Gb and the other one, 256 Mb. The first one is for the system (and was made bootable), and the other one, for swap.
The process completed and rebooted the machine to load linux from installed partition. But when I select Linux from BM it issues the following message: "Selected partition is not formatted, hit any key". I hit a key and return to BM selection menu. What can be the problem and the possible solution?.
Thank you very much.

---
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.
Date: 15 Mar, 2007 on 00:07
BigWarpGuy
Premium member
in staff

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this memberhttp://home.comcast.net/~tomleem
posts: 2298
since: 12 Jan, 2001
26. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message

aasdelat (14 Mar, 2007 16:33):
Thank you for your valuable advices.
eCs yet installed. Now goes Linux.

eCS yet installed? You should give eCS a try. There is a demo cd from the http://www.ecomstation.com . One can download it and create a cd from it and try it without having to install it. IMO eCS is cool.

---
BigWarpGuy
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
OS/2-eCS.org
Director of Communications
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
supporting the past OS/2 user and the future eCS user
http://www.os2ecs.org

Date: 15 Mar, 2007 on 13:33
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
27. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
Sorry, my english is not very good. I meant: eCs is now installed. I've corrected my post.

---
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.
Date: 15 Mar, 2007 on 14:05
El Vato
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this memberhttp://www.metztli-it.com
posts: 113
since: 04 Oct, 2006
28. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 15 Mar, 2007 16:19 (1 times)

aasdelat (15 Mar, 2007 00:07):
Please, can you help me with this issue?:
I've installed Linux (guadalinex, based on Ubuntu). I created with BM two logical drives in the extended partition: one of them is 20 Gb and the other one, 256 Mb. The first one is for the system (and was made bootable), and the other one, for swap.
The process completed and rebooted the machine to load linux from installed partition. But when I select Linux from BM it issues the following message: "Selected partition is not formatted, hit any key". I hit a key and return to BM selection menu. What can be the problem and the possible solution?.
Thank you very much.

Well, at the risk if being kicked out of the forum for providing Linux related content, here is my insight:

It appears that GRand Unified Boot (GRUB) loader was installed on the wrong partition, evidently.

You can check which logical partition number your current Linux installation is by counting the logical partitions from within your OS/2 LVM utility.

Open an OS/2 command prompt and type:

LVM

You will be taken into the Logical View (as discussed elsewhere).

Now press F5.

An you will be taken into the Physical view of your hard disk (again, as
discussed previously).

Press TAB to be changed onto your (physical) hard disk partitions in the lower half of the LVM utility Physical view screen. Please, do not mind Primary partition(s) for now; only observe that you may have 3 primary partitions --with the logical (or extended) set of slices representing the 4th partition (maximum for Intel architecture --I believe).

The first Logical partition is equivalent to Linux's       /dev/hda5
The second Logical partition is equivalent to Linux's   /dev/hda6
The third Logical partition is equivalent to Linux's       /dev/hda7
The fourth Logical partition is equivalent to Linux's    /dev/hda8
The fifth Logical partition is equivalent to Linux's       /dev/hda9
etc., etc..


IMPORTANT:

To GRUB, the first hard disk is hd (irrespective if it is IDE and/or SCSI) .

Let us assume that your Linux installation resides in /dev/hda9 for an IDE hard disk (and/or /dev/sda9 for an SCSI hard disk).

Then your two lines of GRUB's menu.lst configuration file that specify which partition to boot (your root partition where Linux is installed, of course) would read (your distribution name and kernel version will likely differ, of course):

title     Debian GNU/Linux, kernel 2.6.18-4-686
root     (hd0,8)
kernel   /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.18-4-686 root=/dev/hda9 ro


Notice the arguments (hd0,8); GRUB will start counting at index 0 of your
partitioning scheme --just like the arrays in C++ and Java. On the other hand, Linux will "see" the same element as /dev/hda9, i.e, will start counting from index 1, as is evident from the kernel parameter above.

Needless to say when there are problems, the human is supposed to satisfy those two conditions above. After all we insist on using these toys, do not we? Otherwise, your Linux will not boot. GuadaLinux, being based on Ubuntu may have the same issues experienced by OriAl elsewhere (<
http://www.os2world.com/cgi-bin/ultraboard/UltraBoard.cgi?action=Read&BID=61&TID=1712&P=1#ID1712 >),.


Now for a more specific example regarding you Linux distribution. I downloadedthe non-live image (~700MB) and proceeded to install it under OS/2's VirtualPC/2 but the dialogs were too low of the screen view and I could not see what those required.

According, I tried VmWare on my SuSE Linux Entreprise Desktop and allocated two(2) Gigs to the hard disk image whereas the installer required a minimum of three(3) Gigs. It went through notwithstanding. My impression of it??? It is Ubuntu with different colors and a Spanish target market.

Well, provided that you had enough hard disk space and the installation did not end abruptly. This is what is required to reinstall GRUB into its
appropriate partition.

Boot with your non-live bootable CD-media. Select from the menu recovery (Rescatar un sistema dañado) and follow the process that resembles and regular installation except that the upper left corner states rescue (Modo rescate).

From analysis in your OS/2's LVM utility, you found out which logical partition contains your Linux distro. Select the appropriate one. In my specific case, VmWare suggested a couple of SCSI hard drives for better virtual performance.

Hence I selected the Logical partition /dev/sda5 because /dev/sdb5 is another virtual SCSI for SWAP partition file.


I elected from the ensuing menu to reinstall GRUB (Reinstalando el cargador de arranque GRUB) since it gives a high level graphical interface.

You have the option of specifying the partition to reinstall GRUB in either of two ways: the GRUB zero-indexed manner and or the Linux one-indexed manner. Compare both ways and understand why the GRUB way is one less than the Linux
way.

Toggle the selections using the TAB key and select "continue" to reinstallyour GRUB. Complete the rest of the instructions and finally reboot. If everything goes well, you should be able to reboot into your Linux from your OS/2 LVM-enabled BM.

In my case, opening the file /boot/grub/menu.lst in an text editor, I can
show the relationships between what Linux partitioning utility "sees" and what GRUB "sees" --as judged by the file referenced above opened with the Unix/Linux vim text editor, i.e.:

vi -R /boot/grub/menu.lst

Although both entites above perceive different a given set of physical/logical objects, they both arrive at the same conclussion and cooperate to make the OS entities coexist as frictionless as possible and (consequently) boot (to life) appropriately.

...I wish I could say the same of the politicians that derive their power from us, the people; yet, instead of cooperation they engage in mutual destruction demanding of us an irrational servitude.

Henry Thoreau once remarked that when the machinery of governments becomes rusty and does not serve the people anymore, to simply "...let it go, let it go."

Date: 15 Mar, 2007 on 15:44
Terry
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 46
since: 09 Dec, 2004
29. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
This thread has expanded into so much more useful information than my initial question asked for, and this is to our community's credit.

I have yet to find all of these additional considerations to really be adequately addressed like this in other eCS/OS-2 outlets so thoroughly, with this much flexibility, and yet in such a concise manner.

P.S.: This is a good thing.

Date: 15 Mar, 2007 on 18:24
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
30. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 15 Mar, 2007 23:03 (3 times)

Notice the arguments (hd0,8); GRUB will start counting at index 0 of your
partitioning scheme --just like the arrays in C++ and Java. On the other hand, Linux will "see" the same element as /dev/hda9, i.e, will start counting from index 1, as is evident from the kernel parameter above.

Ok. I understand.


GuadaLinux, being based on Ubuntu may have the same issues experienced by OriAl elsewhere (<
http://www.os2world.com/cgi-bin/ultraboard/UltraBoard.cgi?action=Read&BID=61&TID=1712&P=1#ID1712 >),.

I read this thread and other two ones referenced by this one. I reach the conclusion that I have to install grub in the boot sector of /dev/hda6 (in linux notation, not in grub notation). I have linux installed on /dev/hda6 (the second logical volume in the extended partition).
I also read that if I treat to boot guadalinex (ubuntu) with BM, I can lose data. This means that I've lost data because I treated to boot the linux partition from BM (although I can see the folders in /dev/hda6 when I boot from guadalinex bootable cd -live version-).


Now for a more specific example regarding you Linux distribution...

You are a true genius doing so much to help me. I'm very grateful to you.


It is Ubuntu with different colors and a Spanish target market.

Yes, everybody says it.

Boot with your non-live bootable CD-media.

I'm very sorry, but I do not install this version because it is still beta. I install version 3.0.1 live. And this version does not have the recovery option at startup.
But I treated to install Grub from a termial when booted with the Linux cd (v3.0.1 live).
I followed the instructions given in the guadalinex web. The instructions are to type the following commands:
code:

sudo mkdir /mnt/test
sudo mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/test
sudo chroot /mnt/test
sudo grub-install /dev/hda
sudo umount /mnt/test
exit


But I did not dare to issue the "sudo grub-install /dev/hda" command, thinking that it can overwrite BM.
I issued instead the command "sudo grub-install /dev/hda6", but this leads to an error "sudo: unable to lookup guadalinex via gethostbyname()".
I asked this in the guadalinex forum, but they replied me that I must issue "sudo grub-install /dev/hda" and must lose BM.
I do no want to do this. That's why, I post my problem here again.
Thank you for your interest and patinet.
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.
Date: 15 Mar, 2007 on 22:59
El Vato
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this memberhttp://www.metztli-it.com
posts: 113
since: 04 Oct, 2006
31. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 16 Mar, 2007 07:25 (1 times)

aasdelat (15 Mar, 2007 23:03):

I also read that if I treat to boot guadalinex (ubuntu) with BM, I can lose data. This means that I've lost data because I treated to boot the linux partition from BM (although I can see the folders in /dev/hda6 when I boot from guadalinex bootable cd -live version-).


Then you just verified that the assumption is absolutely wrong. BM does not touch the partition that you specify that it boots.

After BM redirects the booting to occur in a given partition, it is up to the operating system at that partition to bootstrap itself by means of GRUB or whatever utility it uses to wake up.


Boot with your non-live bootable CD-media.
[quote]aasdelat (15 Mar, 2007 23:03):
I'm very sorry, but I do not install this version because it is still beta. I install version 3.0.1 live.

Well, now is an propicious time to step outside of the box of the status quo. A "live" CD, if you think about it, should not be able to modify your hard disks.

Download the non-bootable version of your specific Linux Distro and follow the steps outlined to recover. Relax, you are only installing the boot loader and not the "approved" stable packages since they are in your hard disk already.

An additional note. I installed Ubuntu in another test scenario in actual hardware sometime ago and it would not install GRUB in the logical partition that I directed it to do so. Notwithstanding, it "happily" installed on the master boot record of my hard disk. This handicap apparently has been passed on to your Linux distro.

Is this what you are actually typing

sudo mkdir /mnt/test
sudo mount /dev/hda6 /mnt/test
sudo chroot /mnt/test
sudo grub-install /dev/hda6
sudo umount /mnt/test
exit



aasdelat (15 Mar, 2007 23:03):
But I did not dare to issue the "sudo grub-install /dev/hda" command, thinking that it can overwrite BM.

...it will overwrite your BM, definitely.


aasdelat (15 Mar, 2007 23:03):
I issued instead the command "sudo grub-install /dev/hda6", but this leads to an error "sudo: unable to lookup guadalinex via gethostbyname()".

Major Linux distributions that I mentioned elsewhere do not have that handicap.


aasdelat (15 Mar, 2007 23:03):
I asked this in the guadalinex forum, but they replied me that I must issue "sudo grub-install /dev/hda" and must lose BM.

That inflexibility might be acceptable in the WinXX world from where those forum members probably come from, given the fact that Ubuntu is a fairly simple distro, but it is unacceptable in the world of Open Source Software (OSS).

Best of Luck.

Date: 16 Mar, 2007 on 07:22
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
32. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 16 Mar, 2007 21:21 (1 times)

Is this what you are actually typing

sudo mkdir /mnt/test
sudo mount /dev/hda6 /mnt/test
sudo chroot /mnt/test
sudo grub-install /dev/hda6
sudo umount /mnt/test
exit



Yes, it is.

On the other hand, I have downloded the non-bootable version of guadalinex (that's why I've taken so long to answer). But this version (v3.0.1 nolive) doesn't have an option to rescue the system. But, if I interrupt the installation, a menu appears where I can choose what phase of the installation do I want to execute. I choose the grub installation, but it returns an error. I also choose lilo installation, but it also returns an error.


Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.
Date: 16 Mar, 2007 on 17:47
obiwan
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 164
since: 30 Aug, 2006
33. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 17 Mar, 2007 19:24 (3 times)
I wasn't really following this thread, as I'm not that interested in WinXP issues. But I see now I've been quoted here so I ought to clarify, and we'll see if I can be of a little help now that we're talking about GRUB.


aasdelat (15 Mar, 2007 23:03):

I read this thread and other two ones referenced by this one. I reach the conclusion that I have to install grub in the boot sector of /dev/hda6 (in linux notation, not in grub notation). I have linux installed on /dev/hda6 (the second logical volume in the extended partition).

I also read that if I treat to boot guadalinex (ubuntu) with BM, I can lose data. This means that I've lost data because I treated to boot the linux partition from BM (although I can see the folders in /dev/hda6 when I boot from guadalinex bootable cd -live version-).


Thank you for reading those threads Antonio, I'm very glad you learned from them. I did say you can lose data, but I did not mean that you necessarily will lose data just because you try to boot to an unbootable partition. My experience I mentioned was using the old "pre-LVM" BM, and it actually executed whatever randomness was on my unbootable boot sector, and it screwed up my whole MBR making the system unbootable and wiping my partition table. That makes me warn that doing it is dangerous, but I would not assume then that any data is actually missing in your case. If you got a nice clean error message that it could not boot, and you see your partitions and data, it's a safe bet everything is fine. I wasn't so lucky.



But I treated to install Grub from a termial when booted with the Linux cd (v3.0.1 live).
I followed the instructions given in the guadalinex web. The instructions are to type the following commands:
code:

sudo mkdir /mnt/test
sudo mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/test
sudo chroot /mnt/test
sudo grub-install /dev/hda
sudo umount /mnt/test
exit


But I did not dare to issue the "sudo grub-install /dev/hda" command, thinking that it can overwrite BM.
I issued instead the command "sudo grub-install /dev/hda6", but this leads to an error "sudo: unable to lookup guadalinex via gethostbyname()".
I asked this in the guadalinex forum, but they replied me that I must issue "sudo grub-install /dev/hda" and must lose BM.
I do no want to do this. That's why, I post my problem here again.
Thank you for your interest and patinet.

Bravo for not executing grub-install /dev/hda, even when told to by helpers! You did the right thing. You should never overwrite your MBR with GRUB when you want to use BM. They gave you lame advice, because gethostbyname() has absolutely nothing to do with the target to which you are installing GRUB.

What is happening is sudo is doing a lookup on your hostname, which, booted to the CD, is guadalinux, but as you are in a "chroot" environment, it cannot find this host anywhere.

Removed unnecessary complicated fix as it was solved another way.

With those last commands:

code:

sudo grub-install /dev/hda6
exit
sudo umount /mnt/test

That's actually the correct order of the commands, because you have to exit the chroot before you can unmount it.

Another thought I have is that you don't seem to be using a Linux boot partition. Are you sure that is the case? If you have a /boot partition, that is where GRUB should be installed. Even if not it should be ok, but I'm not sure whether you can install GRUB while it is mounted. If that turns out to be a problem, you are going to need to boot to another Linux CD that has GRUB on it so you don't have to execute it from your hard drive. That would also avoid the messiness of gethostbyname(). It may even be worthwhile to just do it, avoiding the bother of the procedure I gave above.

Good luck, and do post how it goes, good or bad.

Date: 16 Mar, 2007 on 21:29
obiwan
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 164
since: 30 Aug, 2006
34. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
This problem confirms once again my thought that we need a native OS/2 LVM-compatible GRUB GUI tool.
Date: 16 Mar, 2007 on 21:48
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
35. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 16 Mar, 2007 23:00 (2 times)
Thank you, obiwan, but I got arround the sudo error by logging in as root, and issuing all the commands without the "sudo". But then, I get another error. Here is what I write and get in the terminal:


live@guadalinex:~$ su
Password:
root@guadalinex:/home/live# mkdir /mnt/test
root@guadalinex:/home/live# mount /dev/hda6 /mnt/test
root@guadalinex:/home/live# chroot /mnt/test
root@guadalinex:/# grub-install /dev/hda6
The file /boot/grub/stage1 not read correctly.
root@guadalinex:/#


Another thought I have is that you don't seem to be using a Linux boot partition. Are you sure that is the case? If you have a /boot partition, that is where GRUB should be installed.

How can I find if I'm using a Linux boot partition. I made it bootable in BM. Do you mean this?.

If that turns out to be a problem, you are going to need to boot to another Linux CD that has GRUB on it so you don't have to execute it from your hard drive.

But I'm booting fom a Linux CD that has GRUB on it. I do not execute it from hard drive.
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.
Date: 16 Mar, 2007 on 22:55
obiwan
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 164
since: 30 Aug, 2006
36. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
Ah, I like the 'su' solution much better. Good work Antonio.

A Linux boot partition is the location of the contents of the /boot directory.

See in Linux each partition has a mount point. So a directory can be just a directory on a filesystem, or it can be another filesystem.

From what I understand of your description, /dev/hda6 is the mount point for your root filesystem, or /. (Not to be confused with /root.)

When you run 'mount /dev/hda6 /mnt/test', you mount the /dev/hda6 filesystem to the mount point /mnt/test. /mnt/test used to be a directory on your CD boot image, but after this command, it now contains the filesystem on the /dev/hda6 partition, until you umount (or reboot).

Usually, a small partition is created for holding your Linux kernel and GRUB binaries, and mounted at /boot. If you don't, then your Linux kernel and GRUB binaries will just be in the /boot directory.

You know you have a Linux boot partition if you have another primary partition other than your OS/2 and BM partitions. You know you should have it if you have no other primary partition and your /boot directory is empty. If that is the case your best bet is to reinstall Linux. No kernel, no boot.

The error about stage1 is critical, it means it's not finding your GRUB binaries. Check if that file is there.

When you mount /dev/hda6 to /mnt/test you are mounting your root filesystem, and when you chroot to it you are effectively running everything from there, so yes you are running GRUB from the hard drive. I'm not sure if that's the problem though.

Date: 16 Mar, 2007 on 23:24
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
37. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message

Usually, a small partition is created for holding your Linux kernel and GRUB binaries, and mounted at /boot. If you don't, then your Linux kernel and GRUB binaries will just be in the /boot directory.

Does this mean that linux cannot boot from a logical drive in the extended partition?. Must it boot from a primary partition?. Although booted from BM?.
I do not have such primary partition.
Will the problem be solved if I install linux on a primary partition?.
Here are the screens from lvm (started in a os/2 session):



Logical Volume Management Tool - Logical View

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿

³ Logical Volume Type Status File System Size (MB)³

ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄŽ

³Linux Guadalinex Compatibility Bootable None 20002 ³

³Linux Swap Compatibility None 258 ³

³eCom Station C: Compatibility Bootable HPFS 25007 ³

³Windows D: Compatibility Bootable NTFS 30004 ³

³[ V1 ] *->E: Compatibility 0 ³

³Fat F: Compatibility None 1035 ³

³[ CDROM 1 ] *->S: Compatibility CDFS 620 ³

³[ CDROM 2 ] *->T: Compatibility CDFS 527 ³

³ ³

³ ³

ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿

³ Disk Partition Size (MB) Disk Name ³

ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄŽ

³Linux Guadalinex 20002 [ D1 ] ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

F1=help F3=exit F5=Physical View Enter=Options Tab=Window

And the following is after pressing F5 (Physical View):

Logical Volume Management Tool - Physical View

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿

³ Physical Disk Size (MB) Free Space: Total Largest ³

ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄŽ

³1 [ D1 ] 76316 0 0 ³

³2 [ D2 ] 96 96 96 ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

³ ³

ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿

³ Disk Partition Size (MB) Type Status Logical Volume ³

ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄŽ

³Windows 30004 Primary In use Windows ³

³[ BOOT MANAGER ] 7 Primary In use ³

³eCom Station 25007 Logical In use eCom Station ³

³Linux Guadalinex 20002 Logical In use Linux Guadalinex ³

³Linux Swap 258 Logical In use Linux Swap ³

ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

F1=help F3=exit F5=Logical View Enter=Options Tab=Window

Although Linux Guadalinex appears with "File System->None", linux is installed there, and with the program "disks-admin" from the bootable linux cd, it appears with ext3 file system, but State->inaccessible (but I can mount and access it).



The error about stage1 is critical, it means it's not finding your GRUB binaries. Check if that file is there.

Yes, it is in the hard disk in "/media/hda6/boot/grub/stage1", and it is also in the CD, and in the ramdisk image (this is the root partition when I boot from the CD), in "/boot/grub/stage1".

---
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.

Date: 17 Mar, 2007 on 09:53
obiwan
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 164
since: 30 Aug, 2006
38. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
GRUB and Linux don't care if it's a primary or logical partition. That's fine. Looks like the GRUB binaries are where they should be. Let's try this a different way. I prefer calling grub directly rather than using grub-install. Just to be sure what your partitions look like, please boot to the Linux CD and post the output of
code:
fdisk -l /dev/hda
Then I'll provide the grub commands to (hopefully) get this done.
Date: 17 Mar, 2007 on 19:36
aasdelat
Normal member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 36
since: 15 Jul, 2005
39. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
Here is the screen with the output:

root@guadalinex:/home/live# fdisk -l /dev/hda

Disco /dev/hda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 cabezas, 63 sectores/pista, 9729 cilindros
Unidades = cilindros de 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Disposit. Inicio Comienzo Fin Bloques Id Sistema
/dev/hda1 * 3826 3826 8032+ a OS/2 Boot Manager
/dev/hda2 1 3825 30724281 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/hda3 3827 9729 47415847+ f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/hda5 * 3827 7014 25607578+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/hda6 * 7015 9564 20482843+ 6 FAT16
/dev/hda7 * 9565 9597 265041 6 FAT16
/dev/hda8 * 9598 9729 1060258+ 6 FAT16

Las entradas de la tabla de particiones no están en el orden del disco
root@guadalinex:/home/live#


If you don't understand spanish words, here is the translation:
Disco = Disk
cabezas = heads
sectores/pista = sectors/track
cilindros = cylinders
Unidades = units
Disposit. = device
inicio = begin
fin = end
Bloques = blocks
Id = Id
Sistema = System

Las entradas de la tabla de particiones no están en el orden del disco = The entries in the partition table are not in the same order that they have in the disk.

---
Antonio Serrano.
Greetings from Málaga, Spain.

Date: 17 Mar, 2007 on 23:42
obiwan
Premium member
in user

View this member's profileSearch all posts from this memberSend an email to this member
posts: 164
since: 30 Aug, 2006
40. Re:Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Reply to this topic with quote Modify your message
last updated at 19 Mar, 2007 18:31 (4 times)
To get to the grub prompt, you should be able to just boot to the CD, use 'su' to become root, and then run grub.

code:

live@guadalinex:~$ su
Password:
root@guadalinex:/home/live# grub
Probing devices to guess BIOS drives. This may take a long time.

GNU GRUB version 0.97 (640K lower / 3072K upper memory)

[ Minimal BASH-like line editing is supported. For the first word, TAB
lists possible command completions. Anywhere else TAB lists the possible
completions of a device/filename. ]

grub>


It should not be necessary to mount and chroot /dev/hda6 unless grub isn't on the CD. Try it without it first. Here are the commands to enter at the grub prompt:

code:

grub> root (hd0,x)
grub> setup (hd0,x)
grub> quit

"Root" refers to GRUB's root, where it should find its binaries, in this case also the Unix root, but in other cases it could be the /boot partition.

Setup means where it should do the GRUB initialization, in this case the boot sector of a partition.

Hd0 refers to the first hard disk.

Replace 'x' with the correct number of the partition (bearing in mind GRUB counts starting with 0).

Removed some specifics to this case as they turned out to be erroneous.

Let's hope this does the trick.

Date: 19 Mar, 2007 on 05:26
Dual-Booting eCS 2.1R and WinXP
Post a new topic Reply to this Topic Printable Version of this Topic Forward this Topic to your Friend Topic Commands (for administrator or moderators only)
All times are CET+1. < Prev. | P. 1 2 3 | Next >
Go to:
 

Powered by UltraBoard 2000 Standard Edition,
Copyright © UltraScripts.com, Inc. 1999-2000.
Home | Gallery | Forums | Services | Webmail | Archive | Links | Contact Us | About Us
OS2 World.Com 2000-2004