Author Topic: Good Bye Net Neutrality  (Read 787 times)

Martin Iturbide

  • OS2World NewsMaster
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 255
  • -Receive: 49
  • Posts: 1708
  • Your Friend Wil Declares...
    • View Profile
    • Martin's Personal Blog
Good Bye Net Neutrality
« on: November 26, 2017, 02:12:39 pm »
Hi.

Net Neutrality is dying on December in the US. My only friends that are in favor of this are the ones that works on ISP and Carriers companies, the rest just think ISP will take advantage and will try to rip us money in any way.

The ISP/Carriers says, "Don't worry, this will only hit the big ones like Amazon, Google, Netflix...". So they will be like Robin Hood, stealing from the rich (Amazon, Google, Netflix) to give it to poor (AT&T, Verizon, ComCast)... wait, that is not the poor !!!. And it is almost for sure if you "tax" Amazon, Google and Netflix they will find a way to make the consumer pay back (...like selling our data to Skynet to make it easy to kill all of us)

Just rest sure that OS2World will never pay the "fast line".

Today I'm reading about this Service(Free and paid options)/Device/Software (open source) called ZeroTier: https://www.zerotier.com/.

Quote
Taking The Profit Out Of Killing 'Net Neutrality' (From Slashdot.org)
Robert Cringely has a plan to ensure that internet providers will never profit from the end of net neutrality:

We are being depended upon to act like sheep -- Internet browsing sheep, if such exist -- and without a plan that's exactly what we'll be. The key to my plan is that this is a rare instance where consumers are not alone. There are just as many or more huge companies that would prefer to keep Net Neutrality as those that oppose it... Those companies in favor of Net Neutrality obviously include the big streamers like Amazon, Hulu, Netflix, YouTube and a bunch of others. They also includes nearly every big Internet concern including Google, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft. Those are some pretty big friends to have on your side -- our side...

So I suggest we all join ZeroTier (ZT), a thriving networking startup operating in Irvine, California. There are other companies like it but I just think ZeroTier is presently the best. ZeroTier is a very sophisticated Virtual Private Network (VPN) company that has created a Software Defined Network that goes beyond what normal VPNs are capable of. To your computer or almost any other networked device (even your smart phone), ZT looks like an Ethernet port, whether your device has Ethernet or not. Through that virtual Ethernet port you connect to a virtual IPv6 Local Area Network that's as big as the Internet itself, though the only users on this overlay network are ZT members.

The trick is to get all those big companies that are pro-Net Neutrality to join ZT. The most it will cost even Netflix is $750 per month, which is probably less than the company spends on salad bars in their Los Gatos HQ. Embracing ZT doesn't mean rejecting the regular Internet. Netflix can still be reached the old fashion way. I just want them to add a presence on ZT, too... What the ISPs won't like about this plan is that ZT traffic can't be read to determine what rules or pricing to apply. They could throttle it all down, but throttling that much traffic isn't really practical.

I don't complete understand it yet. I will keep  reading.

Regards
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 03:31:22 pm by Martin Iturbide »


Martin Iturbide
OS2World NewsMaster
... just share the dream.

Ian Manners

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 31
  • -Receive: 18
  • Posts: 249
  • I am the computer, it is me.
    • View Profile
    • OS/2 Site
Re: Good Bye Net Neutrality
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2017, 04:09:34 pm »
Hi Martin,

They way I view it is the owner of a network is at liberty to do as they wish with that network, they own it. If a customer does not like it they can change providers as happens in a true free market but I also realise that the USA seems to be comprised of several area based monopoly providers. Most odd for a country that call's itself the land of the free and example of a free market, when US network providers appear to have government help in making it difficult if not impossible for others to create new networks.

In Australia, we have what we call the big 4 (Telstra, Optus, Vocus and TPG), there were many more network providers but with the advent of the Australian government getting involved and creating something called the NBN (a new government owned wholesaler), all the little guys sold out and so we ended up where we where 27 years ago with 4 primary network infrastructure owners and a new government owned and controlled fibre provider.

Still, at least they have infrastructure all over the place so Australians still have choice, which prohibits companies from getting carried away with anti competitive practices but eventually I fear that we too will have a similar problem when there is once more only once primary wholesaler for network access. Sigh.

Maybe those in the US of A should tell the different tiers of their government to ignore the lobbyist's and allow network providers to operate in a true free market network without government interference, there would then be no need to consider ideas like Net Neutrality  :o)

Sometimes I think we humans are forever doomed to recreate the same problems over and over as we never learn from past mistakes.

Of cause, it's different in every country so that is one big plus, apart from the joint  government control, namely USA, UK, NZ, Canada, and Australia - which I will omit the name of the collaboration.
Cheers
Ian B Manners

Roderick Klein

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 8
  • Posts: 179
    • View Profile
Re: Good Bye Net Neutrality
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2017, 05:28:29 pm »
This whole discussion about free market is somewhat of a weird thing in the sense that internet has simply become such a extremely key item in our world these days. Many things as business owner or private individual in the Netherlands you can simply no longer do without having internet access.  If you get unemployed for example 99% of the stuff needed to ask for unemployment can only be done online.  The internet is everywhere and its just as vital as other types of infrastructure (railways, roads and airports).

While the internet is operated by many different parties it is clear it has become a vital part of daily. It has also become a vital tool for our democracy to operate. That said it also threatens it, but that is live.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_Netherlands
We have a large degree of network neutrality in the Netherlands but I wonder with the current right wing government how long its going to take before its lobbied away...

Lars

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 21
  • Posts: 166
    • View Profile
Re: Good Bye Net Neutrality
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2017, 08:07:29 pm »
Having the internet under your control is as having all newspaper and radio media under your control.
You can manipulate/fake/alter/interpret news the way you need. If you can do that on a large scale then you have influence on many people's opinion.

And that's the real threat. There are prominent examples from the past and also from the present.

Neil Waldhauer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 6
  • -Receive: 17
  • Posts: 304
    • View Profile
    • Blonde Guy
Re: Good Bye Net Neutrality
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2017, 04:04:22 pm »
Free markets are inherently unstable and devolve into monopolies.

A heavily regulated free market can temporarily achieve stability. Net neutrality is just such a regulation. I wouldn't be needed in a perfect world, but we don't live in a perfect world.
Expert consulting for ArcaOS, OS/2 and eComStation
http://www.blondeguy.com

Greg Pringle

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 2
  • -Receive: 2
  • Posts: 83
    • View Profile
Re: Good Bye Net Neutrality
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2017, 08:29:52 pm »
When I designed an internet protocol for communications in the 1970s I had to make it work on very bad dial up lines. Now I can still use the protocol with the new crappy internet we will have.

Dave Yeo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 8
  • -Receive: 91
  • Posts: 1177
    • View Profile
Re: Good Bye Net Neutrality
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2017, 03:02:58 am »
Free markets are inherently unstable and devolve into monopolies.

A heavily regulated free market can temporarily achieve stability. Net neutrality is just such a regulation. I wouldn't be needed in a perfect world, but we don't live in a perfect world.

The problem is all the people who act like the "free market" is a religion and if we just get the government out of the way, competition will fix everything.