Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Rick C. Hodgin

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 16
1
Storage / Re: Finding an ideal filesystem for Network storage
« on: December 14, 2017, 12:08:40 am »
In terms of managing an OS/2 network of storage devices, what would be the most effective filesystem for speed and efficiency? I really like the way ZFS works on UNIX and UNIX-like systems (combining the volume manager with the actual filesystem). Most of my storage devices are on the small size (i.e. 6 hard drives of about 120-1000GB per disk drive) and I have ecomstation 2.2 on my main device. Since HPFS and JFS both use the B+ tree, what would anyone recommend to manage a network of six storage devices of : 120GB, 60GB, 300GB, 1TB sizes.

There are two aspects.  First, there should be an aggregating server setup which coordinates which volumes are online at any given time.  That is a manager and is queried by any server wishing to populate data onto the network drive, or any client machines retrieve information about the online devices.  And a single OS/2 instance could be both a server and a client.

That aggregating server maintains a virtual map of current online storage, which is then transmitted to each client machine requesting network drive access, with the aggregating server sending out push notifications whenever resources change.

In this way, each server registers its own public data with the aggregating server, which is all aggregated into a single central directory, with the individual resources being indicated that they are on physical servers, which each client then directly communicates with for services on those files on that machine.

This is for data I/O.  The file system then in use would be of any kind OS/2 supports, possibly with emulation to allow OS/2 attributes on a non-OS/2 file system.  But as a file system of choice, I would suggest JFS in moving forward.

I think any modern networking file system has to be both distributed and aggregated as indicated above.  The traffic to the aggregate server would be minimal, and it would constantly communicate with each online resource and signal when things are reliable, unreliable, offline, online, etc., to all client machines connected to it.  It could also perform mirroring and management from a single source, directing files to be moved from one machine to another, copied, all from a single console.

In this way, a single "network volume" is made visible with essentially unlimited storage, with the physical requests to each of the network resources going out to the specific machines to be filled.

My goal is efficient data retrieval  where data is preserved (in case one of the disks fails). How does HPFS handle the problem of disk failure and data corruption? My SATA disks are relatively old.  I'm really interested in the benefits of HPFS over some of the NT filesystems made by MS. Thanks for any responses.  :)

HPFS was originally created by Microsoft.  As I understand it, NTFS was basically a full-on fork of HPFS at a given time, examined, revised, and re-written for Microsoft's purposes thereafter.

UPDATE:  I have not seen this kind of network file system in operation before.  I was proposing what I think is the best way to handle a new creation, created from the ground up.

2
General Discussion / Re: ES/1 open source kernel
« on: December 13, 2017, 10:42:10 am »
32-bits is the color depth.  It uses R,G,B,X each 8-bits.
But only R, G and B are colours - it's still 24bits of colour depth summarised.

By using 10 bits you would get 30bits totally. But 32bits is very uncommon - I cannot think of any practical example.

32-bits is used everywhere.  It is far faster and simpler to code, and automatically maintains alignment in memory.  Some ATI VESA implementations only support 16-bit and 32-bit for data alignment.

Quote
The image you see is a text-based console window projected into graphics modes.  It only uses 16-colors.
Hard-coded or per virtual screen?

Hard-coded presently to emulate VGA BIOS color defaults, but easily extensible.

Since your comment about colors, I have had it in mind to provide calls which allow arbitrary rgba() colors as well.  They would work on graphics consoles by overriding the default mapped color attributes.  I am also adding support for disabled, and underlined text in graphics mode.  Disabled will dither.

3
Programming / Re: IBM Mouse Acceleration Algorithm
« on: December 12, 2017, 03:07:40 pm »
As I don't know which mouse driver is used I have no idea what you're looking for. I have here the second edition ISBN 1-55615-336-8. So Mouse 2.0 with Mouse Driver 8.0 should fit.

Is this it?  Microsoft Mouse Programmer's Reference

Can you thumb through it and see if there is a section on acceleration algorithms?  It was only $5.98 with shipping on Amazon so I went ahead and ordered it.  I don't know if it will have any useful information.  But, it's 350 pages.  Surely something good in there. :-)

I'm looking forward to looking a the DDK and a couple other suggestions.  I haven't had time yet, but hope to this evening.

4
Programming / Re: IBM Mouse Acceleration Algorithm
« on: December 12, 2017, 02:53:48 pm »
Please check the I/O section of IBM DDK. I can recommend the following book:
Microsoft Mouse Programmer's Reference (1989, Microsoft Press, ISBN 1-55615-191-8)
On Hobbes there should be the source code of the former shareware mouse driver RODENT.
The official "IBM Mouse" documentation would be the "IBM PERSONAL SYSTEM/2 MOUSE TECHNICAL REFERENCE OPTION"

Since you know these texts and documents, can you summarize and identify from either your memory or a quick re-examination of the place where it shows the acceleration algorithm?

I am well aware of how to write a mouse algorithm.  What I'm trying to mimic specifically is the acceleration profile, so that the native mouse driver in ES/1 "feels" like a normal mouse in OS/2, as I have observed the mouse experience in OS/2 is different from other operating systems.

I have Ray Duncan's Advanced OS/2 Programming manual by Microsoft Press, ISBN 1-55615-045-8.  It has been very helpful in giving me a baseline as the version of the kernel in existence in OS/2 1.x is simple, elegant, and straight-forward.

It has been my goal to get a good handle on the fundamental design, and then see from 1.x to 2.x to 3.x to 4.x where they were heading at each stage, and to see how they departed from Microsoft's guidance in 1.x to 2.x.

5
Programming / Re: IBM Mouse Acceleration Algorithm
« on: December 12, 2017, 11:09:11 am »
Hi

I have been away for awhile and when ArcaOS was released, I jumped back in.  So forgive me if you already know about these sources listed below.  Its good to be back.

Have you checked Hobbes?

http://hobbes.nmsu.edu/h-browse.php?dir=/pub/os2/system/drivers/mouse

http://hobbes.nmsu.edu/h-browse.php?dir=/pub/os2/dev

Hi David.  Welcome back. :-)  I will check it out.  Thank you.

6
Polls / Re: Compatibility with OS/2
« on: December 11, 2017, 04:24:43 pm »
I hope people, who WERE employees in the 90s, will come forward from wherever they are now
Some of them are connected with Arca Noae.

Interesting.  It is my hope some of them will come over, but I don't hold my breath.  Most people are offended by the fact that this is a project given over to God first, and then to people, and not being done for money.  I have a history of offering up good solutions to people only to have them rejected solely on that basis.  As such, I am accustomed to it.

When I discovered a bug in Panorama we are (with Alex G who's working on OS4 kernel) contacted Lewis Rosenthal, and he asked one of ex-IBM employees about possible effects of the bug (it was annoying bug with boot time crashes in OS4 and colored snow on the screen in eCS 2.x). Then someone (who? I don't know) fixed it.

Both ArcaOS and OS4 kernels works fine. Everything fine, after all. I would like to see both kernels in one installation. But, of course, nobody will deliver them or fix old software for free.

I would like others to come work on ES/2 once the kernel is sufficiently developed.  By having this kernel be from-scratch with our own tools to create and debug new code, and being wholly un-encumbered with any of man's legal licenses, it really empowers people to move forward with a great toolset and a great platform.  My goal is I would like to see ES/2 replace Windows, Linux, and Apple's OS.  I also plan (James 4:15) to create a portable ES/2 version for ARM-based devices, called AS/2.

I want to get ES/2 completed, write a few other apps, and then turn my attention toward replacing all of OS/2 and making a truly native ES/2 distribution that isn't just the kernel, but is a whole new OS.  I do not want to do this coding alone, but it has to start somewhere.  I also have goals in creating hardware which I would really like to address.  I would author equally open-source tools for that project as well, and do it in ES/2.

7
Programming / Re: IBM Mouse Acceleration Algorithm
« on: December 11, 2017, 02:23:24 pm »
Perhaps this will help. It's under the BSD license so you can look. http://hobbes.nmsu.edu/download/pub/os2/system/drivers/mouse/amouse-gui-src-20071101.zip

I was unable to locate any mouse-specific acceleration routines in that code.  I found some for the wheel, but not for general mouse movement.  I may be looking in the wrong place.  I did a grep for "accel" and searched through all the source code references.

If anybody can point out where the algorithms are in that code I would appreciate it.  If not, I may program an FPGA to simulate PS/2 mouse input, and then register on-screen pointer movement with fixed-movement inputs from the FPGA.  That would give me data points to plot the curves and figure out the acceleration.

Sounds like a lot of work for something as simple as mimicking mouse movement though. :-)

8
General Discussion / Re: ES/1 open source kernel
« on: December 11, 2017, 05:42:28 am »
...Unfortunately a colour in PNG files can only have 1, 2, 4 or 8 bits (or additionally 16 bits for grayscale).

The bit depth you indicate there are per color channel bit counts (such as 1, 2, 4 or 8 bits for the red channel, and another 1, 2, 4 or 8 bits for the green, and another set for the blue, resulting in 3-bit, 6-bit, 12-bit, or 24-bit colors by your own statement).

PNG also supports extended true color RGB images with a full 16 bits per color channel, resulting in a total encoding of 48-bit samples per pixel.  And there is one which includes an alpha channel RGBA with 32- or 64-bits per pixel.

www.libpng.org -- Chapter 8 -- PNG Basics -- 8.5.6 RGB

9
General Discussion / Re: ES/1 open source kernel
« on: December 11, 2017, 02:11:18 am »
I can create an app that renders something in colors.  Tell me what to write and I'll post the source code and instructions for how to compile it so you can run it live and see it rendering colors.

I know what I'll write.  The ES/1 logo and splash screen for booting.  Here is a sample from OS/2.

UPDATE:  Here's the initial design.

10
Polls / Re: Compatibility with OS/2
« on: December 10, 2017, 10:34:31 pm »
There are no employees in IBM who remember the 90s.
According to a report by Russian-speaking IBM employee from the forum sql.ru, "IBM today is a conglomerate of companies acquired in Silicon Valley and all around the globe".
So it's better to buy the latest OS version from Arca Noae and concentrate one's efforts on free software.
And, of course, they will not sell nor open anything to a random person (including you and me).

I hope people, who WERE employees in the 90s, will come forward from wherever they are now, and help continue development.  Some may have retired, and are looking for things to do. :-)

11
General Discussion / Re: ES/1 open source kernel
« on: December 10, 2017, 10:30:26 pm »
Here's a screenshot.  I'm using VESA video modes.  This one is 1600 x 1200 with 32-bit color.

It's unbelievable. Unfortunately a colour in PNG files can only have 1, 2, 4 or 8 bits (or additionally 16 bits for grayscale). Simply run a test to count the number of colours in the attached image file.

32-bits is the color depth.  It uses R,G,B,X each 8-bits.

32-bits uses 8:8:8:8 bits for R,G,B,X.
24-bits uses 8:8:8 bits for R,G,B.
16-bits uses 5:6:5 bits for R,G,B.

The image you see is a text-based console window projected into graphics modes.  It only uses 16-colors.

During development of my mouse pointer algorithms, I had some bugs at various times, and every color of the rainbow appeared. :-)

You can see the VESA algorithms I created here.  Search for "bpp" to find references to various drawing algorithms.

I can create an app that renders something in colors.  Tell me what to write and I'll post the source code and instructions for how to compile it so you can run it live and see it rendering colors.

12
Programming / Re: IBM Mouse Acceleration Algorithm
« on: December 10, 2017, 01:58:50 pm »
Perhaps this will help. It's under the BSD license so you can look. http://hobbes.nmsu.edu/download/pub/os2/system/drivers/mouse/amouse-gui-src-20071101.zip

I took a brief glance.  I'll try to look deeper when I get a chance.  Thank you, Dave.

13
General Discussion / Re: ES/1 open source kernel
« on: December 10, 2017, 05:26:17 am »
Here's a screenshot.  I'm using VESA video modes.  This one is 1600 x 1200 with 32-bit color.  You can see the mouse pointer rendered, and I caught the caret/cursor mid-blink so you can see it there near the mouse pointer.

ES/1 allows three types of built-in carets:  (1) boxed outline, (2) line [shown in the image], and (3) solid.  There is also a 4th type, which is a custom caret up to 16 x 32 in size.

The mouse pointers supported by default are:  (1) arrow, (2) inverse arrow [white with black outline], (3) cross, (4) I-Beam, and a custom type of up to 16 x 32 in size.

Carets and mouse pointers are all up to 254 shades of gray, so they can be smoother than what I have shown there.  You can see their default appearances here.

UPDATE:  The information at the bottom is debugging info:  mouse position, timer tick, caret position.  The caret flashes on and off and is only displayed on ticks, not tocks.  Here it's on a tick cycle.

14
Programming / Re: IBM Mouse Acceleration Algorithm
« on: December 10, 2017, 12:20:48 am »
I see charts like this.  They make sense to me.  But I'd like to replicate the OS/2 mouse feel.

15
Programming / IBM Mouse Acceleration Algorithm
« on: December 10, 2017, 12:05:27 am »
Does anybody know the IBM algorithm they used for their mouse acceleration?  I am unable to duplicate the feel (with limited attempting).

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 16