Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Rick C. Hodgin

Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9]
121
General Discussion / Re: Exodus OS/3
« on: April 01, 2016, 05:47:16 pm »
There's something else that's factoring in to my future outlook for this OS/3 I'm targeting... and that's new technology coming out from Micron and Intel.  It promises to deliver 6TB (six terabytes) of non-volatile DRAM on a dual-cpu system.

What does this mean?  No more hard disks.   No more block storage devices except for loading and interchange between machines (USB disks, etc).  It means computers that instantly shut down, and come back on, with everything running exactly as it was before it was shut down, with the only things required to re-sync are live protocol devices, like internet connections, wifi, etc.

This is game changing technology and the OS of the future must target it appropriately.

3D XPoint non-volatile memory

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

122
General Discussion / Re: Exodus OS/3
« on: April 01, 2016, 04:16:02 pm »
I have spoken with Valerius on #osFree and discovered that "osFree" was supposed to be a similar sounding name, pronounced almost like "OS/3".

The osFree project and I have a lot of the same goals, but not all of them.  I'll keep working with the folk there to see what we can come up with.  In the mean-time, I'm continuing to develop my kernel toolset (assembler, and C compiler).

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

123
General Discussion / ES/2 open source OS/2 kernel
« on: April 01, 2016, 03:13:09 pm »
This thread is created to discuss the creation of the next-generation OS/2 operating system, one which removes some legacy baggage in the base OS/2 design, and extends the functionality of the kernel to include some features which have been introduced in the past 15 years, including an augment to the basic UI to include 3D graphics and a new driver model which uses nodes and node connections rather than manual settings as their primary form of setting things up (see an example of this node system here in Blender's 3D software node editor).

I am open to thoughts, suggestions on this migration.  Please know that it comes from examining the base OS/2 kernel design, along with its CPI and portions of its API.  There are simply some things which no longer seem completely relevant, and can be replaced with a few similar abilities for those people who have real needs in those areas.

Ultimately I would also like for Exodus OS/3 to be a full hypervisor, allowing for guest OSes (including OS/3 and the existing versions of OS/2) to run within the machine virtually.

All it takes is the lot of us working together and we can do this. :-)

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

124
General Discussion / Re: Open Source / 2
« on: April 01, 2016, 03:09:15 pm »
With Martin's guidance, I have been able to find everything necessary to handle the kernel development, and API replication, so that the system I'm creating is as compatible with OS/2 as I'll be able to make it.

OS/2 4.5 Toolkit Documents

In reviewing this material, I have come to realize that there is a large portion of the system design that really isn't relevant any longer in 2016 and beyond.  In addition, there are some disruptive technologies due out in the middle of this year (namely Intel's 3D XPoint memory, which is a non-volatile memory 1000x faster than NAND, 10x more dense than DRAM, and has the ability to change the way operating systems are designed, and operate).

As such, I will be migrating my efforts to what I'm going to call Exodus OS/3, which will be basically OS/2 with the DOS and Windows portions stripped out, and some new extensions added which allow use of 3D graphics devices to provide a type of node-based connection mechanism between drivers and applications, rather than through config file settings (see Blender 3D software and specifically Blender's node editor for what I'm thinking about -- it won't be quite like that, but similar in that you hook things up using the lines/noodles which go between (see a YouTube video example here), so imagine being able to route your digital sound to audio devices by simply plugging them in, or to be able to direct your printer driver to the network so it now exposes it as a device available on an OS/3 network, etc.).

I am also open to hearing input on what should be done.  Eventually I would like for Exodus OS/3 to support a virtual machine allowing for guest OSes as well, including a full version of OS/2 4.52 as it exists today.

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

125
General Discussion / Re: Open Source / 2
« on: April 01, 2016, 02:03:48 am »
With Martin's guidance, I have been able to find everything necessary to handle the kernel development, and API replication, so that the system I'm creating is as compatible with OS/2 as I'll be able to make it.

OS/2 4.5 Toolkit Documents

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

126
Microsoft and Linux together?  Nothing good can come from this partnership.  It's a frightening move.

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

127
General Discussion / Re: Open Source / 2
« on: March 17, 2016, 04:07:48 pm »
Hi

There are also some open source projects that I consider that should be taken notice when trying to produce OS/2 clone alternatives.
If I'm based on the OS/2 components architecture I think it is good to see the source code of this projects and check what can it be re-used.

- OS/2 Kernel:
* OS2Ldr - OS/2 Loader, there are some articles and samples on how to create an clone loader.

- CPI - Control Program Interface.
* OS2Linux - has some functions available
* OSFree - OSFree Project generated some of the forwarder's DLLs of this component.

- Presentation Manager
* OSFree - OSFree grabbed things from FreePM.

- SOM
* somFree - It was not created or ported to OS/2.
* NOM - Was a SOM replacement project created by Netlabs.

- Workplace Shell
* XWorkplace - Some WPS classes replacement and improvements.
* Several open source WPS Classes.

There are some other projects that are not open source, but has the source code available:
- OS/2 Kernel:
* QSInit - OS/2 Loader - Source code available - Free for Non commercial use.
* SCREEN01.SYS, PRINT01.SYS, KBDBASE.SYS, CLOCK01.SYS, RESOURCE.SYS - Source code is on the IBM DDK, but the source code can not be shared (only privately improved). Binaries can be freeware for any use.

But remember that some of this are only "half-baked" projects and was not completed.  This are the ones that came to my mind right now, there my be other out there.

Excellent.  Thank you, Martin.  I was able to locate a copy of the IBM DDK from 2004.  I've had a preliminary look and it is an amazing treasure trove of information.  It should provide a solid map to the API.

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

128
General Discussion / Re: Open Source / 2
« on: March 17, 2016, 04:05:03 pm »
I'm not a developer so I have limited skills on this area. My way of thinking about the continuity of OS/2 in the long term future is to try to grab little things from OS/2 and clone them as open source and test that it keep working on the OS/2 platform (trying not to break compatibility). I think that sometimes planning super big projects (without having high budgets) produce too much stress and people just dump out the idea because the lack of short term deliverable. So, I prefer when people do little things, even if the first version is not stable enough. But that little things can be added up to other things to produce a bigger things, and with time even bad open source code can be improved.

I wish you luck with your project and I'm here to help on whatever is on my hands.

I appreciate that.  I've had high hopes on the last two projects I've worked on that some developers would come and help out.  It didn't happen on the first project, but on the second I had two developers contribute source code:  http://www.visual-freepro.org/wiki/index.php/VXB#Contributions

That project is an XBASE tool called Visual FreePro, Jr. (VJr), that is designed to be a nearly 100% compatible open alternative to Visual FoxPro.  I'm to the point in development on it where I need to complete the compiler.  I had previously planned to work on it this year and complete it, but there just isn't interest in the project right now, and no help.  I had planned to complete VJr by mid-2017 and resume development on my OS then.  However, I've revised that plan to get my kernel up and running and then complete development of VJr inside my kernel to give it a nice developer base for making business apps.

The kernel has been a long-time goal for me.  I began it when I was about 25 years old.  I'm now 46 years old and am resuming full-time (after my normal day job that is) development on it.  I'll try to get my developer toolsets completed this year, and have the kernel able to boot and launch and run apps using the basic video drivers in the emulation environment.

I may not post much here once I get deep into development.  Compiler development is particularly tricky, but I won't be worrying about optimization in the first release, so that will make it somewhat easier.  And, because it is my own kernel design, I will have free reign over what gets added and where.

I'd like to expose a fully compatible API with OS/2's kernel, allowing it ultimately to be a literal drop-in replacement, but unless I get some documentation that won't be possible because I refuse to reverse-engineer the kernel design since it's illegal to do so.

I've written an email to Scott Garfinkle at IBM.  No reply yet.  We'll see if anything comes from there.

As for now, my plans are to create a very OS/2-like system, with many of the same features, but it will be a new kernel, and a new system, new drivers, etc., and atop that I will expose an identical API to the published API, along with some extensions, allowing for existing code that relies upon many OS/2 features to be recompiled and work in ES/2 and AS/2.

And, I'm hoping other developers will come on board later this year when the toolset is maturing, or at least next year when some real progress is being shown.  These are my plans, but I keep them within the constraint of James 4:15 (Lord willing).  :)

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

129
General Discussion / Re: Open Source / 2
« on: March 17, 2016, 01:04:12 pm »
Hi Rick,

I am pleased that you found your way here.  You will find some of the same people you met in the newsgroups and some new people as well.

Thanks, Ivan.  Martin Iturbide has been a big help as a guide.

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

130
General Discussion / Re: Open Source / 2
« on: March 16, 2016, 09:27:47 pm »
Hello all.  My name is Rick C. Hodgin.  I'm a software developer from Indianapolis, IN, USA.  I began working on my own kernel back in the mid-90s, and worked extensively on it from 1998-2002.  It boots, has full support for everything internally except paging (by design).  I got married in 2002 and my priorities changed.  However, I've always maintained plans to come back to it and complete it.

As of earlier this year I have resolved to do that with a full-throttle effort.  My family is on board with the project, and in the mean-time I've developed a host of other applications which will now benefit me greatly in moving forward.

I wanted to outline some of my plans for my kernel:

Originally I had planned to create my own custom beast.  I have a very solid mental image of what I want in a system design, and I will still in many ways target that end.  However, in reviewing operating systems a few weeks ago I came back across OS/2.  I had used OS/2 back in the 90s, but I was not aware of its amazing system design and robust capabilities until I came across some OS/2 videos (on OS/2 2.1 of all things).  As soon as I saw those features, namely the object-oriented design of the worksplace shell and the ability to close and resume tasks exactly where they were when the system went down, I resolved to incorporate those fundamental abilities into my OS.

As such, my previous kernel (called Exodus) has now had its goals revamped somewhat and will be called ExoduS/2, or ES/2 for short. I also plan to port the kernel to ARM-based CPUs, and will call it ArmoduS/2, or AS/2 for short.

My goals for development are vast.  I would like for other coders to come on board to help where they could once the system is to a particular level of development.  I believe together we could create a really amazing alternative to OS/2, which is very much OS/2-like in its operation, including supporting most of its API, the presentation manager, file system format, and more.

Here are my goals.  I will do my best to achieve them:

-----
Mar.01.2016 - Dec.31.2016
Complete low-level kernel development toolset, which includes a full edit-and-continue toolchain for real-time re-compilation and debugging while running in the kernel itself.

By Dec.31.2016 it should be booting in the new toolset, able to be debugged and developed in source-code form as we're going.

-----
Jan.01.2017 - Dec.31.2017
Support paging in the kernel, add necessary drivers, develop and complete the workplace shell clone, presentation manager clone, and port the kernel developer toolset to a full edit-and-continue developer suite occupying all of the kernel, driver, and user app spaces.

Work on the port of ES/2 to ArmoduS/2 should begin somewhere during this timeframe as well.

-----
Jan.01.2017 - Dec.31.2018
Port or re-write as many system utilities and applications as possible to the kernel design, expanding the kernel abilities as needed.

This brings us to sometime in 2018 to 2019 when the system should be in a stable and usable state, able to be expanded on by the full community effort as more and more apps are ported.

At this time I would like to the necessary support to allow other developers to port whatever toolsets they'd like to use to ES/2 and AS/2, and to be at the community's call for what large goals should be worked on next.

My primary goals are to get the kernel working, in an easy development state, stable, robust, and to be able to build everything atop that solid bedrock foundation.

-----
The current state of my kernel can be seen here in source code:
https://github.com/RickCHodgin/libsf/tree/master/exodus/source

And here in a video outlining my monochrome graphical debugger, called Debi (for DEBug Intel, I plan to create a version called Debra for DEBug ARm):
http://www.visual-freepro.org/videos/2014_02_13__exodus_debi_debugger.ogv

Note:
If you can't view the video, use VLC (http://www.videolan.org).

-----
Please note also that I am a devout Christian.  But, don't let that derail your support.  It just means I have much love for you inside. :-)  I'm good people, and while I am giving this offering back to the Lord using the skills, talents, and abilities He first gave me, I am also giving it to the people He's placed me around here in this world.

This type of giving, one-to-another, using the skills we've been blessed with, it's something that strengthens and binds us together as a common people group interested in our common, shared thing (in this case an OS/2 operating system).  That binding together helps us grow with affinity toward one another because of the shared foundation.  It builds a solid base from which all other things can proceed.  In my experience, it's very rewarding.

If you'd like, you can reach me at my name below all squished together with periods (like.a.here) at gmail.

Best regards,
Rick C. Hodgin

Pages: 1 ... 7 8 [9]