OS/2 Warp 3 Documentation

From OS2World.com Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

By IBM

“Reprint Courtesy of International Business Machines Corporation, © International Business Machines Corporation”

Contents

Version Notice 1/1

First Edition (October 1994)

The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you. This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time. It is possible that this publication may contain reference to, or information about, IBM products (machines and programs), programming, or services that are not announced in your country. Such references or information must not be construed to mean that IBM intends to announce such IBM products, programming, or services in your country. Requests for technical information about IBM products should be made to your IBM authorized reseller or IBM marketing representative.

Contributors 2/1

Authors c.
Linda S. Rogers
Lisa DeMeo
Karla Stagray
Contributing Authors c.
Su Hill
Val Enright
David Spicer
Marion Lindsey
Lana Meadows
Kathy Hancock
Editors c.
Elizabeth Jean
Tracey Marcelo
Roger Didio
Design c.
Brian Black
Jeff Lewis
National Language Support c.
Joseph Hunt
Mike Cress
Gene Ignatowski
Publications Manager c.
John D. Lloyd
Managing Editor c.
Dan Baker
Publishing Assistant Editor c.
Linda S. Rogers
Editorial Assistant c.
Victor Laird
Production Coordinator c.
Elyse Anchell
Tools Support c.
Gene Ignatowski
Rick Goldsmith
Usability Testing c.
Lynn VanDyke
Carol Righi
Alan Rose
John Tyler

Welcome 3/1+

Hello and welcome to OS/2. You're about to begin using your computer in an exciting new way-as a productivity aid that helps you get your work done quickly and easily. This book is for anyone who uses OS/2, whether you're just beginning, are familiar with computers, or have lots of technical expertise. It contains all the information you need to install and use OS/2 effectively, from the basics to "know-how" information to expert tips and technical details.

  • "Part 1: Installing OS/2" contains system preparation tasks and installation instructions.
  • "Part 2: Exploring OS/2" offers a self-paced, interactive guided tour of the Desktop.
  • "Part 3: Using OS/2" provides step-by-step instructions for using each object on the Desktop.
  • "Part 4: Troubleshooting" includes technical tips and techniques for resolving problems and keeping your system running smoothly.
  • "Part 5: Advanced Installation" is for technical users who want to customize their installation.
  • Appendix A describes techniques for using a mouse or a keyboard.

You'll find this book easy to use if you look for these simple conventions:

  • Boldface type indicates the name of an item you need to select.
  • Italics type indicates new terms, book titles, or variable information that must be replaced by an actual value.
  • Monospace type indicates an example (such as a fictitious path or file name) or text that is displayed on the screen.
  • uppercase type indicates a file name, command name, or acronym.

So why not get started right away? Here are some easy paths to follow, depending on what you want to accomplish:

  • To install OS/2, go to Part 1.
  • If you're new to OS/2 or just want to explore, go to Part 2.
  • To access the extensive online information, go to Part 2.
  • To learn how to use OS/2, go to Part 3.

About OS/2 Version 3 4/2+

OS/2* Version 3 is an advanced, 32-bit operating system that runs on 4MB systems and provides excellent response time to both 16-bit and 32-bit applications. OS/2 Version 3 is easier to install and to use and has better performance than previous versions of the OS/2 operating system.

Installation Improvements in OS/2 Version 3 5/3

OS/2 Version 3 includes an Easy Installation choice. You can choose Easy Installation to install OS/2 from diskette or CD-ROM. Easy Installation lets the system choose which options to install. After you select Easy Installation, you don't have to make any more installation decisions. In addition, OS/2 Version 3 has the following installation improvements:

  • It takes less time and fewer diskettes to complete an installation.
  • The system automatically installs the Dual Boot feature when you install over DOS.
  • You can install more than one printer during the initial installation.
  • Multimedia installation is a part of the OS/2 installation.

Performance 6/3

Performance improvements make OS/2 Version 3 faster at displaying objects on the Desktop, moving from one window to another, and displaying information in the Master Help Index and Glossary.

New Features 7/3

OS/2 Version 3 has the following new features that make the system easier to use:

  • The LaunchPad provides a quick and easy way to get to commands and objects that you use often.
  • The Using OS/2 tutorial is a vastly improved and expanded learning tool that provides basic, step-by-step information, including a Practice push button that takes you to the Desktop to try the task for yourself, as well as expert tips and special hints for Microsoft** Windows** users.
  • Comet Cursor is a trail that follows your mouse pointer to help you see it on portable computer screens.
  • The Pickup and Drop choices on the pop-up menu for an object let you use other Desktop functions while dragging and dropping objects.
  • The Desktop page of the Desktop Settings notebook lets you arrange your Desktop the way you like it and have the system restore that Desktop each time you restart your system.
  • The Archive page of Desktop Settings, together with the Recovery Choices screen, lets you save different versions of your system files and choose which version you want to use to restart your system.
  • Undo Arrange now accompanies the Arrange feature available from the pop-up menu for an object.
  • A redesigned Desktop now has new three-dimensional icons and animated icons.
  • Two color palettes are available - Solid Color Palette and Mixed Color Palette. The Solid Color Palette was designed for use with systems that have VGA display support. The Mixed Color Palette was designed for use with systems that have SVGA display support. The paint roller has been changed to a paint bucket as an additional enhancement.
  • An enhanced Scheme Palette with many new schemes to choose from.
  • Newly designed mouse pointer options include the ability to change the look and size of the mouse pointer.
  • The new Fastload option improves application loading time.
  • Enhanced PCMCIA support enables you to switch devices and automatically reconfigures your system while you continue to work.

Part 1- Installing OS/2 8/1

As You Begin 9/1+

This chapter contains preliminary information to get you ready to install OS/2*.

Complete all the procedures in this chapter. Then choose an installation method.

The OS/2 operating system can be installed over the following products:

  • OS/2 for Windows
  • OS/2 Version 1.3
  • DOS Versions 3.3 or later
  • Microsoft Windows Versions 3.1 or 3.11
  • Windows for Workgroups 3.1 or 3.11
Note: OS/2 does not enable the LAN connectivity function of Windows for Workgroups. For information on how to use the network function after installing OS/2, see the online book, Application Considerations.

If you do not need Windows function, you can install OS/2:

  • Without Windows
  • With an earlier version of Windows
However, you will not be able to run Windows programs.

Preparing Your System 10/2

Before installing OS/2, check the following:

  • If you are installing on a computer that has Windows on it, make sure you have the diskettes or the CD that was used to install Windows.
    Note:
    1. Some computer manufacturers preinstall Windows on your computer, and then provide a utility program so you can create your own Windows diskettes. If Windows was preinstalled on your computer, create the Windows diskettes before you begin installing OS/2
    2. If you used device drivers, fonts, or specific language information files different from those included on the Windows diskettes, or from those that were preinstalled on your computer, you might overwrite these files when installing OS/2. Reinstall those device drivers after installing OS/2.
  • Be sure the files on your hard disk are not compressed. If you are using a DOS compression program, such as Stacker**, AdStor, or DoubleSpace, decompress the disk on which DOS and Windows are installed. Refer to the manual that came with the compression program for instructions.

Note: If the compression program you are using does not specifically state that it works with OS/2, you will not be able to use the compression program after OS/2 is installed.

  • See updates to the Installation program in the README.INS file on the Installation Diskette. Follow these steps:
  1. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.
  2. Turn on the computer. If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system.
  3. When prompted to do so, remove the Installation Diskette and insert Diskette 1 into the drive; then press Enter.
  4. When the Welcome screen appears, press F3 to display a command prompt.
  5. Remove Diskette 1 from drive A and reinsert the Installation Diskette. Then do one of the following:
    • To view the README file online, type tedit readme.ins and press Enter. Press PF4 to quit the editor.
    • To print a copy of the README file, type copy readme.ins > LPT1 and press Enter. (LPT1 represents the port to which your printer is connected. If you are using another port, type the correct port.)
  • Make sure you have the minimum hardware and software required to install OS/2:
    • An Intel** 80386 SX (or higher) 32-bit microprocessor
    • At least 4MB of random access memory (RAM)
    • A hard disk with 35MB to 50MB of free space, plus an additional 10MB of hard disk space for multimedia support (for example, for a sound card)
    • A 1.44MB diskette drive
    • VGA video support
    • An IBM-compatible mouse
      Note: Both DOS and Windows provide programs that check and list your memory and installed hardware. To view this information, do one of the following:
      • If you have PC DOS 6.1 or later installed on your computer, type qconfig at the command line and press Enter.
      • If you have Windows installed on your computer, select Run from the File menu. Then type msd and press Enter.
  • Refer to Special Hardware Considerations if you are using any of the following equipment:
Gateway 2000**
A system with Phoenix**, AMI**, or Micronics** BIOS
ATI** Graphics Ultra** Pro display adapter
An EISA system with an Adaptec** 1742A controller card
IBM* PS/2 with ABIOS on the Reference Diskette
IBM PS/2 Model 76
IBM ThinkPad* with a Docking Station
A system with an Aox upgrade
Quantum** II Hard Card
Sony**, Panasonic**, Creative Labs, IBM ISA, Philips**, Mitsumi**, BSR, or Tandy non-SCSI CD-ROM drive
Unsupported CD-ROM or SCSI/CD-ROM combination
IBM M-Audio Capture and Playback Adapter
Sound Blaster**
ProAudio Spectrum** 16

Choosing Easy or Advanced Installation 11/2

Use Easy Installation to install OS/2 with preselected settings, based on your current hardware and software. The Easy Installation program installs the operating system in the same partition as your DOS and Windows (if you have DOS and Windows installed on your computer), uses the File Allocation Table (FAT) file system, and installs the following OS/2 features on your computer:

Documentation, including:

The OS/2 Tutorial
Command Reference
Windows in OS/2
Application Considerations
Performance Considerations
Printing in OS/2
Multimedia

All system fonts

Optional System Utilities, including:

Backup Hard Disk
Change File Attributes
Manage Partition
Restore Backed-Up Files
Sort Filter

Tools and Games, including:

Enhanced Editor
Seek and Scan
Chess
Solitaire
OS/2 DOS Support
Multimedia Software Support (if required capabilities are detected on your computer)
REXX
Optional Bit Maps
Advanced Power Management (if required capabilities are detected on your computer)
PCMCIA (if required capabilities are detected on your computer)

To use Easy Installation, go to Using Easy Installation.

Important

Use Advanced Installation only if you are an experienced computer user. This method lets you customize how OS/2 will be installed on your computer, including:

  • Installing OS/2 on a drive or partition other than C
  • Installing OS/2 in a logical drive
  • Using the HPFS file system
  • Selecting which of the OS/2 features you want to install
  • Installing OS/2 so it can be used with Boot Manager

To use Advanced Installation, go to Using Advanced Installation.

Using Easy Installation 12/1+

This chapter describes how to install OS/2 on your computer using the Easy Installation method. Easy Installation was designed to help you install OS/2 without having to answer technical questions about your computer and its attached hardware. Throughout the installation process, the program will search and detect the type of hardware and software you are using on your computer. Then, the Installation program will install a preselected set of the features of OS/2. If you would prefer to customize the installation of OS/2 on your computer, and if you are experienced at installing operating systems, you might want to use the Advanced Installation method. Refer to Using Advanced Installation for more information about that method. Easy Installation installs OS/2 using defaults (options that are preselected so you don't have to make decisions or selections). If you use this method, OS/2 will be installed as follows:

  • If DOS and Windows are in a primary, drive C partition, OS/2 will be installed in that partition.
  • The partition will not be reformatted.
  • The Dual Boot feature will be automatically set up for you, so you can start your computer from either DOS or OS/2.
  • If you are installing OS/2 Version 3 over a previous version of OS/2, your OS/2 Desktop will be preserved for you.

Preparing for the Installation 13/2

During Easy Installation, you will be asked to insert diskettes (or a compact disc (CD), if you are installing from a CD-ROM drive) and to remove diskettes. Follow the directions you see on the screen. Be prepared to:

  • Indicate the type of printer that is connected to your computer. If you do not know the type of printer you are using, refer to the documentation that came with your printer.
  • Insert the original diskettes or CD that came with Microsoft Windows. Be sure to have your Windows diskettes or CD handy before you install OS/2.

If you have any problems during the installation, press the F1 key to view the online help that is available whenever you see F1=Help at the bottom of a screen. If you have problems with any of your hardware or if you receive error messages during the installation, refer to Solving Installation Problems.

Installing the Operating System 14/2

To install OS/2 using the Easy Installation method, follow these steps:

  1. If your computer is on, close all running applications.
  2. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.
  3. Turn your computer on. If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart it.
  4. Remove the Installation Diskette from drive A and insert Diskette 1. Then press Enter. As files are loaded into memory, you will see messages asking you to wait, followed by a black screen. Then the screen appears.
  5. If you are installing OS/2 from diskettes, go to step 6. If you are installing from a CD, insert the OS/2 CD into the CD-ROM drive; then press Enter.
  6. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to highlight Easy Installation. Then press Enter.
  7. Follow the instructions on the screen. If you are installing from diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes as the installation progresses. If you are installing from a CD, you will not see any messages to remove diskettes.
    After Diskette 6, you will be asked to reinsert the Installation Diskette and then reinsert Diskette 1. Follow the instructions on the screen. After you remove Diskette 1 and press Enter, you will see the System Configuration screen.
  8. The System Configuration screen shows your country configuration and the hardware devices that the Installation program detected on your system. Check the choices on the screen to be sure they are correct. If any of the hardware listed on the screen is incorrect, use the mouse to click on the icon (the small picture) next to the device name. A screen will appear where you can indicate the correct information about your hardware device. If you are unsure about the hardware you are using, refer to the documentation that came with it. Follow the instructions on each screen. Click on Help if you need more information about any screen you see. If the information on the System Configuration screen is correct, click on OK.
    A special note about Super VGA displays: If your system has a Super VGA (SVGA) display, you will see a screen at the end of the Installation program where you can configure your computer for the SVGA display.
  9. When the Select System Default Printer window appears, use the arrow keys or your mouse to highlight the name of your printer in the list of printer names. Then indicate the port to which your printer is attached:
    • If your printer is connected to a parallel port (the connector on the PC end of the printer cable has pins), click on the LPT1, LPT2, or LPT3 button Then press Enter.
    • If your printer is connected to a serial port (the connector on the PC end of the printer cable has holes), click on the COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4 button. Then press Enter.
      If you do not have a printer attached to your computer, select Do not install default printer and press Enter or click on OK.
  10. If you received a Warning message at the beginning of the Installation program telling you that you did not have enough free disk space to install OS/2, but you decided to continue with the installation anyway, you will see the OS/2 Setup and Installation screen. Go to step 11.
    If you did not receive a Warning message at the beginning of the Installation program, go to step 12.
  11. The OS/2 Setup and Installation screen lets you select the software features you want to install. You will notice that some features have a check mark next to them, which means they are selected for installation.
    The amount of hard disk space required for each feature is shown to the right of the feature. Follow these steps:
    a. Click on options you do not want to install to deselect them. By deselecting features, you will save hard disk space.
    b. If a More button appears to the right of an option, click on the button to see additional items you can select or deselect.
    c. Click on Install when you are done making all your selections
  12. Follow the instructions that appear on each screen. You will be asked to remove and insert diskettes, including one or more Printer Driver diskettes.
  13. If you have a Super VGA (SVGA) display, you will see the Monitor Configuration/Selection Utility screen. Follow the instructions on the screen; click on Help if you need more information.
  14. When prompted to do so, insert the Display Driver diskettes that are part of the OS/2 installation.
  15. When a screen appears asking you to insert your Windows diskettes, do one of the following (if Windows was preinstalled on your computer when you bought it, you can skip this step and go to step 18):
    • If you installed Windows from diskettes, follow these steps:
    a. Remove the OS/2 diskette that is currently in drive A.
    b. Insert the requested Windows diskette and press Enter.
    c. Continue removing and inserting your Windows diskettes as requested.
    • If you installed Windows from a CD, follow these steps:
    a. Remove the OS/2 CD from the CD-ROM drive.
    b. Insert the Windows CD into the CD-ROM drive and press Enter.
    c. When prompted for the location of the Windows files on the CD, type the drive letter and directory name in the field provided.
    For example:
    e:\winsetup
    where e: is the letter of the CD-ROM drive, and where \winsetup is the directory that contains the Windows files.
  16. When prompted to do so, remove the Windows diskette or CD and press Enter.
  17. When the OS/2 Installation is complete, you will be prompted to shut down and restart your computer. Click on OK or press enter.
  18. When your computer restarts, the OS/2 Tutorial will appear on your screen.

View the Tutorial to learn about the features of OS/2 and how to use your Desktop. The tutorial also provides information to help you make the transition from DOS and Windows to OS/2. For more help on using the operating system, you can access the online help system. Press F1 anytime to get help, or if you see a Help push button at the bottom of a screen, you can click on it to get more information about that screen.

Switching between OS/2 and DOS with Dual Boot 15/2+

When you install OS/2 using the Easy Installation method, a Dual Boot feature is automatically set up for you as well. Dual Boot lets you switch back and forth between OS/2 and DOS (you might want to do this because some DOS programs do not run under OS/2).

Dual Boot also keeps track of which operating system should start when you turn on your computer. Each time you shut down and restart your computer, it will start (boot) in whichever operating system was last being used. For example, if you shut down your system while DOS is running, your system will start in DOS the next time you turn on your computer.

Starting the Dual Boot Feature 16/3

Use the Dual Boot function to switch from one operating system to another:

  • To switch from OS/2 to DOS:
    1. Open OS/2 System on your Desktop.
    2. Open Command Prompts.
    3. Open Dual Boot.
    4. When a message appears asking if you want your system to be reset, type Y and press Enter.

Note: If you want to run your DOS programs while OS/2 is running, you can use the DOS sessions that are part of OS/2 for most DOS programs. By using these sessions, you don't have to use Dual Boot, which shuts down your OS/2 session. To use a DOS session, open DOS Window or DOS Full Screen from the Command Prompts folder.

  • To switch from DOS to OS/2:
    1. At the DOS command prompt, type c:\os2\boot /os2
    2. Press Enter.

For more information about the BOOT command, refer to the Command Reference. The Command Reference is located in the Information folder on your OS/2 Desktop.

Installing DOS after Installing OS/2 17/3

If you installed OS/2 on drive C, formatted the drive with the FAT file system, and you did not already have DOS installed, your system will still have the Dual Boot capability. However, you must install DOS to use the Dual Boot feature. To add Dual Boot after installing OS/2, follow these steps:

  1. Open OS/2 System on your Desktop.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open Dual Boot. A Warning box appears reminding you that DOS was not installed and asking if you want to continue.
  4. Type Y and press Enter. You will see messages that your system is being prepared, and then a warning that you must shut down your system. Press Enter to close the window.
  5. Shut down your system:
    a. Position the mouse pointer on a blank space on your Desktop and press mouse button 2.
    b. Select Shut down... from the menu that appears.
    c. When a message appears telling you to turn off your computer, do so.
  6. Install DOS on your computer. Follow the instructions that came in your DOS package.
  7. At the DOS command line, type c:\os2\boot /os2 and press Enter to return to your OS/2 Desktop.

What to Do if Dual Boot Does Not Work 18/3

If the BOOT command is unsuccessful when you try to switch from DOS to OS/2, you might have programs running that take up too much of your computer's memory. If so, close the programs before you use the BOOT command. If the programs are loaded from your AUTOEXEC.BAT file, you must deactivate the programs before using the BOOT command.

Using Windows Programs 19/2+

When you install OS/2 on a computer that has Windows installed on it, all of your Windows functions are still available. If you installed OS/2 with the Easy Installation method, any Windows programs you had on your computer were automatically placed in folders on your OS/2 Desktop. You can also use the Windows Program Manager by opening a WIN-OS/2 command prompt from the Command Prompts folder in the OS/2 System folder. To use your Windows programs after installing OS/2, use the following procedures:

  • To run a Windows program from your OS/2 Desktop:
    1. Open WIN-OS/2* Groups, or Windows Programs or Additional Windows Progams (whichever contains the program object you want to open).
    2. Open the program you want to use.
  • To run a Windows program from the Windows Program Manager:
    1. Open OS/2 System on your Desktop.
    2. Open Command Prompts.
    3. Open WIN-OS/2 Full Screen or WIN-OS/2 Window.
    4. Open the program you want to use.

Installing Windows after Installing OS/2 20/3

If you installed OS/2 on a computer that did not have Microsoft Windows on it already, you can install Windows later if you have a partition formatted with the FAT file system. Follow these steps:

  1. Start your computer with DOS. Do one of the following:
    • Open Dual Boot in the Command Prompts folder.
    • Select DOS from the Boot Manager menu.
    Note: If you have not installed DOS, refer to the procedure in Installing DOS after Installing OS/2.
  2. When a message appears asking if you want your system to be reset, type Y and press Enter.
  3. Install Windows in a FAT-formatted partition or logical drive.
  4. Shut down your computer, and then restart it with OS/2.
  5. Open System Setup in the OS/2 System folder.
  6. Open Selective Install
  7. When the System Configuration screen appears, select OK.
  8. On the OS/2 Setup and Installation screen, select WIN-OS/2 Support. Then select Install
  9. When the Advanced Options window appears, select OK to continue.
  10. When prompted to do so, insert and remove the numbered OS/2 installation diskettes.
  11. When prompted to do so, insert and remove the numbered Windows diskettes.
  12. When prompted to do so, shut down and restart your computer so the changes can take effect.

What to Do if You Have Problems during Installation 21/2

The installation of OS/2 is generally a straightforward process and, in most cases, you will not encounter any problems. However, if you do have problems either during the installation process or immediately afterwards, refer to Solving Installation Problems. Problems you might encounter include:

  • A blank screen after installation.
  • An error message with a number and, sometimes, text.
  • A hardware device that does not work. (This problem can occur if you are using hardware that is not supported by OS/2.)

If these or other problems occur, refer to Solving Installation Problems.

Part 2 - Exploring OS/2 22/1

Exploring the Desktop 23/1+

In this chapter you will learn about and explore computer terms you should know, the OS/2 tutorial (Using OS/2), the icons (small pictures) that are displayed on your Desktop, and the online information that is available. There will be times when you are sent from this book to your computer so that you can explore the Desktop. Be sure to have your computer on with the Desktop or the tutorial displayed.

Understanding Terminology 24/2

Before you begin your exploration of the Desktop, it's important to recognize the terminology used in this book and in other OS/2 information. The following terms are used in addition to click and double-click to describe mouse actions.

Select
Point to an item and click mouse button 1. Instructions explain which item to point to.
Open
Point to an item and double-click mouse button 1. Instructions explain which item to point to.

For more information about click and double-click, review the "Using the Mouse" section of Using OS/2.

Using the Tutorial 25/2

Begin your exploration by going through the OS/2 tutorial (Using OS/2). The Using OS/2 tutorial was created to teach you the basics of OS/2 step-by-step, and to provide advanced hints and topics for experienced DOS, OS/2, or Microsoft Windows users. Try It! If the tutorial is not displayed on the Desktop, you can find it on the LaunchPad. Use either of the following procedures to display the tutorial:

  • If you don't know how to use a mouse:
    1. Press and release the Alt and Tab keys at the same time until you highlight the LaunchPad, and then press Enter to open the LaunchPad.
    2. Use the Left or Right Arrow key to highlight the Using OS/2 (its the icon with the question mark on it), and then press Enter.
  • If you know how to use a mouse: c.
    1. Double-click on the LaunchPad icon if it is not already open on the Desktop.
    2. Click on Using OS/2 (its the icon with the question mark on it), located in the Front Panel, to display the tutorial on the Desktop.

Return to this book when the tutorial is displayed. Look at the tutorial now. The information box at the bottom of the window describes how to start the tutorial. To the right of the box are push buttons that you can click on with your mouse. When the text or graphic on a button is black, the button is active and available for use. When it is grey, the button is not active and cannot be used. Try It!

  • If you don't know how to use a mouse, press the Spacebar on your keyboard to start the "Using the Mouse" instructions in the tutorial. These instructions explain mouse terminology and teach you how to use a mouse.
  • If you know how to use a mouse, press Enter or click on (select) the > button to begin the tutorial.

Return to this book when you have completed this procedure. After you have viewed "Using the Mouse" or if you bypassed that section, the tutorial begins with the Introduction panel. Move the mouse pointer around the window and read the text in the information box to learn about the features in the tutorial. The area on the left side of the tutorial window is the selection area. The selection area contains twelve push buttons that you click on to select. The tutorial topics are displayed on the first seven push buttons. Click on a push button to display the tutorial contents list. Double-click on the topic text to go directly to that topic, or click on the > button to continue through the topics. The eighth push button is the tutorial index, which provides a list of all tutorial topics. The topics are organized in groups that relate to the main topic push buttons. Corresponding subtopics are listed below. When you double-click on a topic in the index, you go directly to that topic. This can be helpful if you want to review a topic that you have already tried but are unable to remember where it is listed.

The remaining four push buttons are available when you are within certain tutorial topics. They provide the following information:

Practice
Lets you to try a task for yourself. When you select Practice, the tutorial window moves to reveal the Desktop. The window provides instruction for a task you can perform on the Desktop. You will navigate through folders and objects to perform the task as you would from the Desktop.
OS/2
Provides tips for using OS/2. The OS/2 tips are displayed automatically in the information box for each tutorial topic.
Windows
Provides tips for the Microsoft Windows user. The Windows tips compare OS/2 tasks to similar tasks in Windows.
Expert
Provides advanced tips for the more experienced OS/2 user.

You can move throughout the tutorial at your own pace and review the topics in any order.

Using the Desktop and Its Objects 26/2+

The icons that you see on the Desktop are called objects. Some of these objects are folders. Folders are objects that contain other objects and folders. Think of the Desktop as one big folder or the main folder that contains everything you need to use OS/2. If you are familiar with DOS and Microsoft Windows you can think of the Desktop folder as a directory and the folders it contains as subdirectories. Other types of objects are data files, program files, or device files.

Note: Throughout this book, the Desktop is also referred to as the Workplace Shell.

When you look at the Desktop, you will see the following objects:

  • The OS/2 System folder contains objects you can use to set up OS/2 the way you want it. You can use these objects to change your mouse for left-handed use or to speed up the click rate, as well as to change the colors and look of the Desktop.
  • The Information folder contains online information, including Using OS/2 (the online tutorial), and the Master Help Index, and online books, including Command Reference, Glossary, Printing in OS/2, Application Considerations, Windows Programs in OS/2, Performance Considerations,Using Multimedia, and REXX Information. See Using the Information.
  • The Templates folder contains object models (templates) for the different types of objects in OS/2. These templates make it easy for you to create new objects for files, folders, programs, and other objects. See Using Templates.
  • The LaunchPad contains the objects you use most often. You can also add other objects to the LaunchPad. For more information about using the LaunchPad, refer to "Using the LaunchPad" later in this chapter.

During installation, if OS/2 recognizes that your computer has an audio card, multimedia support is automatically installed and your Desktop also will include the following:

  • The Multimedia folder contains the multimedia applications that are supported by your computer. You can find out more about these Multimedia objects in the online Multimedia book, located in the Information folder.
  • During installation, if OS/2 finds Windows programs already installed on your computer, your Desktop also will include these icons.
  • The Windows Programs folder contains program objects for the Windows programs you had installed before you installed OS/2.
  • The WIN-OS/2 Groups folder contains program objects for the Windows Groups programs that were created under the Windows Program Manager.

To find out more about these Windows program objects, refer to the online book Windows Programs in OS/2.

Using Pop-up Menus 27/3

Now that you know a little bit about the objects on the Desktop, you should also know that each object has its own menu known as a pop-up menu. Pop-up menus contain items that relate specifically to an object as well as items that are common to all objects. Some of the standard pop-up menu items include:

Open
Opens an object or folder and displays its contents, starts a program, or displays a data file. Selecting Open is the same as double-clicking on an object. Some items have an arrow to the right of Open that lets you choose how you want your icons to be displayed. You have three choices:
Icon View Displays the icons randomly within the folder.
Tree View Displays the objects in a hierarchy.
Details View Displays the properties of the objects (for example, the date and time the object was created, the full name of the object, and any other special attributes associated with the object).
Settings Opens the Settings notebook for the object. The Settings notebook looks like a book with tabs and enables you to view and change the current settings for the object.
Help Displays general help information about the object. Select the arrow to the right of Help to display a list of the types of help available for the object.
Help Index Displays an alphabetic list of available help topics for the active program.
General Help Displays help information about the active window. This is the same information you would see if you were to select Help from the pop-up menu or press the F1 key while the open window is active.
Using Help Explains all the ways you can get help for objects on the Desktop.
Keys Help Explains the different groups of keys you can use with OS/2.
     When you select a specific group, additional help is displayed with a list
     of the keys provided for the group.
Create another Lets you create another object from the pop-up menu and works
the same as if you were to drag a template from the Templates folder.
Copy Makes a duplicate of the selected object and its contents.
Move Lets you move an object to a new location anywhere on the Desktop.
Create shadow Creates a duplicate of an object but differs from a copy in that
it automatically exchanges data between the shadow and the original object.
When you make changes in the shadow object, the original object is updated with
the same data.
Pickup and Drop Enables you to move an object and perform other tasks before
you drop the object in its new location.  Drop will not be displayed on the
pop-up menu until you have selected Pickup.
Window Displays additional menu items that enable you to manage the size and
location of the window and close the open window.
Find Helps you locate any object in the system.
Arrange and Undo Arrange Organizes the objects on the Desktop or the open
active window in horizontal rows across the top of the screen.  Undo Arrange
places the objects in the location where they were before you selected Arrange.
 Undo Arrange will not be displayed on the pop-up menu until you have selected
Arrange.
Try It!
The Desktop has its own pop-up menu, and each object has its own pop-up menu.
To display the pop-up menu for the Desktop, try the following: c.
  1. Move the mouse pointer to an empty area on the Desktop.
  2. Press mouse button 2 to display the Desktop pop-up menu.
     Look at the menu items on the pop-up menu.  The Desktop pop-up menu
     contains items that no other pop-up menu has - Lockup now, Shut down, and
     System Setup.
To display the pop-up menu for an object, try the following.  In this example,
you will display the pop-up menu for the OS/2 System object. c.
  1. Move the mouse pointer to OS/2 System.
  2. Press mouse button 2 to display the pop-up menu for the object.
     Notice that some of the items on the pop-up menu for the object are
     different from those you saw on the Desktop pop-up. Each object has menu
     items that are exclusive to that object.

For more information about pop-up menus, select the menus topic in the Master Help Index, and then select any of the topics of interest to you.

Using Settings Notebooks 28/3

Each object has its own Settings notebook. The Settings notebook enables you to customize settings for each object. Just as the pop-up menus for an object have exclusive and common menu items, the Settings notebooks have exclusive settings pages. Some of the standard settings pages are as follows:

View
Use the View page to select how icons and their text are displayed.
Include
Use the Include page to include objects that you want in your folder and exclude objects you don't want in your folder.
Sort
Use the Sort page to determine the menu items listed when you select the arrow to the right of Sort in the pop-up menu. You determine how you want the objects in folders sorted by selecting the items from the pop-up menu.
Background
Use the Background page to select an image or color to display in the background of any open folder, including the Desktop. You can select a different image or color for each and every folder on the Desktop.
Menu
Use the menu page to customize your pop-up menu items. You can add, delete, or change the items on the pop-up menu or the cascaded menu that is displayed when you select the arrow to the right of a menu item.
File
Use the File page to view the file name and path of a file object. You can also define the object as a work area object. A work-area folder lets you put together objects that are related to a specific task. For more information about the Files page, select files topic from the Master Help Index and then select File information about objects. For more information about work-area folders, select the folders topic from the Master Help Index and then select Creating a work-area folder.
Window
Use the Window page to customize the window behavior for each object on the Desktop. Window behavior includes how and where you want your object to be minimized, how you want the window to open, and which button (hide or minimize) you want to appear on the window. every time you double-click on it.
General
Use the General page to change the name or the icon displayed for the folder currently selected or open.

There are additional settings pages available, but the pages listed above are some of the most common. You can get help for settings pages by selecting the Help push button, which is available on every page. Try It!

Use the following procedure as a guide to displaying the Settings notebook for an object:

  1. Move the mouse pointer to OS/2 System.
  2. Press mouse button 2 to display the pop-up menu for the object.
  3. Select Settings to display the Settings notebook for the object.
     Notice that each page is identified by a tab on the right side of the
     notebook.
  4. Select the Window tab to display the Window page.
     Look at the bottom of the page.  You will see Window - Page 1 of 2, which
     lets you know that there is more than one page associated with the Window
     tab.
  5. Click on the right arrow at the bottom of the page to display page 2 for
     the Window tab.
     Some of the tabs in the notebooks can have up to 3 or 4 pages with which
     they are associated.  Simply select the right arrow to move forward
     through the pages and the left arrow to move backward through the pages.
     You can also use the arrows instead of the tabs to page through the
     notebooks.
  6. Double-click on the title-bar icon to close the notebook.

When you make changes to the Settings notebook, the changes take effect immediately after you close the notebook.

Finding Information 29/2+

OS/2 provides plenty of information online, in the form of help information and books, that you can use as you are working.

Getting Help 30/3+

Help information is available for every object on the Desktop, every menu item on pop-up and pull-down menus, and every place you see a Help push button. Try It! If you want to learn how to use the online help functions, be sure the Using OS/2 tutorial is displayed. Then use the following procedure:

  1. Select the About Help push button.
  2. Review the panels about OS/2 Help.
  3. Read the instructions on the right side of the window and in the
     information box.
  4. Select the Practice push button to try it out.

Return to this book when you are finished.

F1 Help 31/4

F1 help provides information about objects, pop-up menu items, entry fields, and push buttons. You use the F1 help by selecting or highlighting an item and pressing the F1 key on your keyboard. Try It! To get F1 help for each item on a pop-up menu, try the following:

  1. Click on the down arrow icon in the upper-left corner of the tutorial
     window. The title-bar icon menu for the OS/2 tutorial is displayed.
  2. Press the Down Arrow key on your keyboard and watch the focus box move
     from menu item to menu item.  Try this several times and stop at the Close
     menu item.
  3. Now press the F1 key on your keyboard.
     A helpful explanation about why you might want to use this menu item is
     displayed.
  4. Double-click on the title-bar icon in the upper-left corner of the help
     window, next to Help for Close, to close the help window.
Return to this book when you are finished.

Help Push Button 32/4

Another way to get help is to use the Help push button available on most of the object pop-up menus and notebook pages. These Help push buttons let you work with the object while you learn how to use it. Try It! To learn how to use the Help push buttons, try the following:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Solid Color Palette.
  4. Click on the Edit Color push button.
  5. When the Edit Color window is displayed, move it to the left side of the
     screen to make room for the help panel.
  6. Click on the Help push button.
  7. Read the information provided in the help window.  Notice the highlighted
     words within the help text.  These words indicate that additional
     information is available.
     You can use the Edit Color window while the Help information is displayed.
  8. When you are finished reading the help information, you can close the help
     window by double-clicking on the title-bar icon in the upper-left corner
     of the help window.
Another way to get help is by using an online book called the Master Help
Index.  For more information refer to "Mastering the Master Help Index" in Part
3 of this book.

Viewing Information Online 33/3+

When you installed OS/2, online information and books were added to the Information folder. These books and information describe information about printing in OS/2, using Windows programs in OS/2, program and performance considerations, using OS/2 multimedia programs, a book that identifies trademarks used in the online information, a glossary of terms and the Master Help Index, which is your main online help resource. The following books are in the Information folder.

Master Help Index 34/4

The Master Help Index provides help for practically everything you want to know about using OS/2. It is set up like a dictionary that has tabs. These tabs can help you find topics quickly. After you select a tab, use the scroll bar to page down to the topic you are looking for. You will sometimes find that after you select a topic, a secondary list of topics is displayed. This list of topics is related to the topic you selected. Try It!

To learn about the Master Help Index:

  1. Select the About Help push button.
  2. Select the Using the Master Help Index topic.
  3. Read the instructions on the right side of the window and in the information box.
  4. Select the Practice push button to try it out.

Hint:

You can use the keys on your keyboard to move to sections in the index. Simply press the key that corresponds to the first letter of the topic, and the entries that start with that letter will be displayed.

For more information refer to "Mastering the Master Help Index" in Part 3 of this book.

Command Reference 35/4

If you are familiar with using a command line or you want to learn how to use one, you will find the online Command Reference to be very helpful. This book contains descriptions of all the commands you can use at an OS/2 command prompt.

You might already be familiar with some of the commands because some are actually identical to those you have used with DOS. Some of the commands are new and some contain additional parameters specific for use with OS/2. For more information about command lines, see "Using Command Prompts" in Part 3 of this book. Try It!

To learn how to use the Command Reference, review the "Using the Command Reference" topic located in the About Help section of the tutorial. When you are finished, close the tutorial and try the following steps:

  1. Open the Information folder.
  2. Open the Command Reference.
  3. Select the + sign next to OS/2 Commands By Name to display all the OS/2 commands.
  4. Open the command for which you want information.

Note: You might see + signs next to some of the commands in the list. The + signs indicate that additional information pertaining to these commands is available. Click on the + sign to view the additional topics.

Glossary 36/4

The Glossary provides definitions for terms used in the OS/2 information. The Glossary looks like a dictionary and can be used in the same way the Master Help Index is used. You can use the tutorial to find out more about the Glossary.

REXX Information 37/4

This book provides information to acquaint you with the REXX language and programming concepts.

Windows Programs in OS/2 38/4

This book provides information about using OS/2 and Windows programs together under OS/2.

Application Considerations 39/4

This book provides information about the settings or tasks you need to perform to enable certain programs to run under OS/2.

Performance Considerations 40/4

This book provides information about how to improve the performance of your system, memory management, model-specific computer problems, and COM ports.

Printing in OS/2 41/4

This book provides information for everything you want to know about printing in OS/2-from installing a printer to solving printer problems.

Multimedia 42/4

This book provides information pertaining to the multimedia programs available with OS/2.

Trademarks 43/4

This book provides trademark information for trademarks mentioned in the online books and online help information.

Using the LaunchPad 44/2+

The LaunchPad holds the objects and push buttons that you use most often. Some of the most commonly used objects are already on the LaunchPad.

Using LaunchPad Push Buttons 45/3+

The push buttons at the left side of the LaunchPad let you secure your computer while you are away, shut down your computer when you are done working for the day, locate things on the Desktop, and display a list of all the windows you have open on the Desktop. The following describes the push buttons on the LaunchPad.

Lockup Push Button 46/4

You can use Lockup to lock up your computer keyboard and display at any time. By locking up your computer, you can keep others from using your computer while you are away. Try It! To lock up your computer, you must first decide on a password. Your password can be from 1 to 15 characters long. Think of a password now, write it down, and put it in a safe place. Then try the following:

  1. Select the Lockup push button on the left side of the LaunchPad.
  2. Read the text in the window and type your password in the Password field next to the blinking cursor.
  3. Press the Enter key on your keyboard and the cursor will start blinking in the Password (for verification) field.
  4. Type the same password again to verify that you entered the password correctly.
  5. Select the OK push button.
  6. Select the Lockup push button on the LaunchPad. The OS/2 Logo screen is displayed and a Help push button is available at the bottom right side of the screen.
  7. Type your password, and then press Enter. You will return to the Desktop.

Note: After you have specified your password, your screen will automatically lock up within three minutes if there is no action being performed on the Desktop. Realize that it is very important to be sure to:

 REMEMBER YOUR PASSWORD!

After you have decided upon a password and entered it into the Password window, you will not see the password window again unless you decide at some later time that you want to change your password. Now, whenever you select Lockup on the LaunchPad, your computer will be automatically locked up. To change your password, or any of the other settings associated with the Lockup push button, you must use the settings menu choice in the Desktop pop-up menu. Try It! To see the Lockup settings available and to change your password, try the following:

  1. Using mouse button 2, click on an open area on the Desktop. The Desktop pop-up menu is displayed.
  2. Select Settings to display the Settings notebook for the Desktop.
  3. Select the Lockup tab.
    Notice that the Lockup tab has three pages associated with it. The bottom right corner of the page is labeled Lockup - Page 1 of 3. The page currently displayed is the Timeout page. Use this page to change the current settings for how much time you want to pass before the computer automatically locks up. Timeout is set for 3 minutes by default. The second page enables you to decide what graphics or colors you want to be displayed while your computer is locked up. The Lockup screen is set to display the OS/2 Logo screen by default. The screen is displayed in the Preview area of the page. Page 3 is the page you use to change your current password.
  4. Move the mouse pointer to the right arrow and select it until the Password Page in the notebook is displayed.
  5. Type your new password in the Password field and then again in the Password (for verification) field. If you need help, select the Help push button.
  6. Select OK.

Remember to lock up your computer when you are away to prevent someone from using it.

Find Push Button 47/2+

The Find push button helps you locate objects in the system. If you can't remember where to find your favorite game, you can use the Find option to help you locate it. Try It! To learn how to use Find, try the following:

  1. Select Find on the LaunchPad. The Find Objects window is displayed.
  2. Select the Help push button at the bottom of the window.
  3. Read the information about how to use Find. Be sure to read through to the end of the help information, where you can find a list of the fields available on the Find Objects window. You can double-click on the highlighted items to display additional information about how to use these fields. Be sure to select the Previous push button at the bottom of the help window to return to the original help information for Find.
  4. Double-click on the title-bar icon in the help window when you are finished using the help information. This will close the help window.

Window List Push Button 48/3

You can use the Window List push button to help you locate open objects, reopen minimized windows, or close open windows. Try It! To learn about the Window List, try the following:

  1. Select the Window List push button.
     A list of open active windows is displayed.  The Desktop is the first
     window in the list.  The list also includes the LaunchPad and any other
     active objects or folders you might have already opened.
  2. Select the title-bar icon located in the upper-left corner of the window.
  3. Select the arrow to the right of Help.
  4. Select General Help.
  5. Read the information in the help window to learn more about the Window
     List and how to use it.

Shut Down Push Button 49/3

After you have given OS/2 its daily workout, you must take care and remember to shut down your computer. Shut down is the cool-down exercise for this powerful operating system. When you shut down your computer, information about which windows are open and where they are located on the Desktop is saved in the storage buffer on your hard disk. When you select Shut down, you will see a window asking if you are ready to shut down. Simply select the OK push button and you will be on your way to performing a successful shutdown. Remember to use the Shut down option when you are finished working for the day. Note: Be sure to check all programs for unsaved information (such as data files you might be editing) before you start the shutdown procedure. Note: Never turn off the power on your computer until you have completed a shutdown.

Using Objects on the LaunchPad 50/3+

The objects on the right side of the LaunchPad are shadows of objects that already exist elsewhere in OS/2. A shadow object is linked to the original object but it can reside in a different location on the Desktop. The purpose of a shadow object is to allow you to use an object from the Desktop whether or not it is located on drive C. When you make a change to the shadow, the change also occurs in the original. By creating a shadow of the original object instead of creating a copy, you can save space on your hard disk and still use the functions of the object. The following are the objects on the LaunchPad:

Drive A Object 51/4

The Drive A object gives you access to the information provided on a diskette you insert into the diskette drive slot on your computer. When you select the drawer button for the Drive A object, you will see that it contains the Drive C object (if Drive C is the drive where you installed OS/2). This object gives you access to the contents of Drive C in your computer. For more information about accessing drives, see "Using Drives" in Part 3 of this book.

OS/2 Window Object 52/4

The OS/2 Window object gives you access to an OS/2 command prompt in a window on the Desktop. You can use the OS/2 command prompt in much the same way as a DOS command prompt - by typing a command at the command prompt. When you select the drawer button for the OS/2 Window object, you will see that it contains the DOS Window object. The DOS Window object provides you access to a DOS command prompt in a window on the Desktop. Here you can use the DOS commands with which you are already familiar. For more information about using a command prompt, refer to the online Command Reference, or the "Using Command Prompts" in Part 3 of this book.

Using OS/2 Object 53/4

The Using OS/2 object gives you instant access to the OS/2 tutorial. Use the tutorial to learn something new, to refresh your memory about how to do something, or to experience hands-on practice using OS/2.

Shredder Object 54/4

The Shredder provides a quick way for you to delete files, objects, or folders that you no longer have a use for. For more information about the Shredder, see the online Master Help Index.

Printer Object 55/4

The printer object is added to the LaunchPad only if a printer was set up when you installed OS/2. You might not have a printer object on your LaunchPad. If you want to know how to set up a printer, use the information provided in the online Printing in OS/2 book located in the Information folder.

Adding Objects to the LaunchPad 56/3

You can easily add any object you want to the LaunchPad by simply dragging the object to the right side of the LaunchPad. The LaunchPad will expand to include the object on the panel. Try It! When adding an object to the LaunchPad, use the following example as a guide. In this example, the System Clock is added to the LaunchPad:

  1. Open the OS/2 System folder.
  2. Open the System Setup folder.
  3. Move the mouse pointer over the System Clock object.
  4. Press and hold mouse button 2 and move the object in between two objects on the LaunchPad until you see a single, solid black bar. This black bar indicates where the object will be added to the LaunchPad.

For more information about the LaunchPad, refer to the Master Help Index, the Using OS/2 tutorial, and the help information provided with the LaunchPad.

Part 3 - Using OS/2 57/1

Customizing Your System 58/1+

The System Setup object contains objects that help you customize your system. To open System Setup:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.

or:

  1. Point to an empty area on the Desktop.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select System Setup.

Color Palette 59/2+

The Color Palette is used to customize the colors on your screen. You can change the color of the following parts of the Workplace Shell*:

  • Desktop
  • Titles of the objects on the Desktop and in folders
  • Different parts of the windows, such as push buttons, scroll bars, and the background.

There are two colors palettes, one is a Solid Color Palette for low resolution displays and one is a Mixed Color Palette for high resolution displays. The Solid Color Palette contains 16 solid colors and the Mixed Color palette contains 256 mixed colors. Use the OS/2 Tutorial for an interactive demonstration of how to use the Color Palettes. The following steps can be used for both the Solid and the Mixed Color Palettes.

Changing Screen Colors 60/3

To globally change the color of an item (for example, change the color of the background in every window):

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Color Palette.
  4. Make sure that the item you want to change is visible.
  5. Point to a color on the color palette.
  6. Press and hold Alt.
  7. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  8. Drag the color to the item you want to change. The mouse pointer changes to a paint bucket.
  9. Release mouse button 2.
  10. Release Alt. The color of all instances of the item changes to the new color.
  11. Point to the title-bar icon.
  12. Double-click.

To change the color of a specific item (for example, change the color of the vertical scroll bar in this window only):

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Color Palette.
  4. Make sure that the item you want to change is visible.
  5. Point to a color on the color palette.
  6. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  7. Drag the color to the item you want to change.
  8. Release mouse button 2. The color of the item changes to the new color.
  9. Point to the title-bar icon.
  10. Double-click.

Changing the Color of Object Titles 61/3

To change the color of the titles of objects:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Color Palette.
  4. Make sure an object title is visible in the folder. (You cannot change an individual title color. Changing one title color changes every title color in the folder.)
  5. Point to a color on the Color Palette.
  6. Press and hold Ctrl.
  7. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  8. Drag the color to a title in the folder.
  9. Release mouse button 2.
  10. Release Ctrl. The color of every title in the folder changes to the new color.

Changing the Colors on the Color Palette 62/3

You can change the colors available on the Color Palette:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Color Palette.
  4. Select the color on the Color Palette that you want to change.
  5. Select Edit color. A window appears in which you can make adjustments to or change the color. For more information about the choices available in this window, select the Help push button.
  6. When the correct color appears in the box on the color bar in the window, point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click. The Color Palette window is displayed with the new color.

Country 63/2

When you installed OS/2, you determined settings like date, time, numbers, and currency of a specific country. The Country settings notebook lets you change these settings. You can select a specific country and have all the formats changed automatically, or you can make individual format selections. To change country formats:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Select Country.
    Tip Using the Selective Install object in the System Setup folder, you can
    reconfigure the operating system to support another national language
    without having to reinstall the entire operating system (see Selective
    Install).

For country-dependent information, refer to the COUNTRY statement in the online Command Reference.

Device Driver Install 64/2

Many devices that you attach to a computer, such as a CD-ROM drive, mouse, display, and printer come with a device driver diskette. The device driver diskette (sometimes called a device support diskette) contains the code needed by the computer to recognize and operate the device. The Device Driver Install object is used to install any device driver except those for printers and plotters. To install a device driver for a printer or plotter, see Installing a Printer. To install a device driver (other than one for a printer or plotter):

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Device Driver Install.
  4. Insert the device driver diskette.
  5. Select Install.
  6. Select the device driver to install from the list.
  7. Select OK.

For additional information, refer to the documentation that came with the device. Note: Do not use the Device Driver Install object to install device drivers found on the OS/2 Installation diskettes.

Font Palette 65/2+

The Font Palette allows you to:

  • Change the typeface of any text in the Workplace Shell interface
  • Change sample typefaces currently available on the Font Palette
  • Add new fonts to your system
  • Delete existing fonts from your system

A font is a collection of characters and symbols of a particular size and style used to produce text on displays and printers. When you install OS/2, the IBM Core Fonts are automatically installed, unless you specify otherwise. The IBM Core Fonts can be used by your display and IBM LaserPrinter, HP** LaserJet**, and PostScript** printers. The IBM Core Fonts consist of a set of 13 Adobe** Type 1 fonts that work with the Adobe Type Manager** (ATM). The table that follows lists the IBM Core Fonts.

IBM Core Fonts
FAMILY NAME TYPEFACE
Times New Roman** Times New Roman
Times New Roman Bold
Times New Roman Bold Italic
Times New Roman Italic
Helvetica** Helvetica
Helvetica Bold
Helvetica Bold Italic
Helvetica Italic
Courier Courier
Courier Bold
Courier Bold Italic
Courier Italic
Symbol Set Symbol Set

The Adobe Type Manager is an integral part of the OS/2 operating system and works with existing OS/2 and Windows application programs to produce the sharpest possible fonts on the screen and on the printed page. Because it incorporates PostScript outline font technology, the ATM program eliminates jagged fonts so that your screen can display high-quality typefaces of any size or style. The ATM program also enables even inexpensive printers to print PostScript language fonts that are crisp and smooth. Note: If you want to use the fonts for both OS/2 and Windows applications, you must install the font files using both the Font Palette and the ATM Control Panel.

Changing Fonts 66/3

The Font Palette window displays sample typefaces of eight of the fonts installed on your system. You can use these samples to change any text in the Workplace Shell interface. To change the typeface of text:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Font Palette.
  4. Point to the sample typeface you want to use.
  5. Press and hold mouse button 2. The mouse pointer changes to a pencil.
  6. Drag the sample typeface to the object whose text font you want to change.
    If you drag a sample typeface to an object on the Desktop, the text of all the objects on the Desktop changes to that typeface. If you drag a sample typeface to an open object, such as a folder, the typeface will change only for the objects within the folder.
  7. Release mouse button 2.

Selecting Sample Typefaces for the Font Palette 67/3

To change which sample typefaces appear on the Font Palette:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Font Palette.
  4. Select the sample typeface you want to change.
  5. Select Edit font.  The Edit Font window appears.
  6. Select the down arrow for the Name field.
  7. Select a new typeface from the list.
  8. Select the Style and Size if desired.
  9. Select the appropriate Emphasis if desired.
 10. Point to the title-bar icon.
 11. Double-click.

Adding Fonts to Your System 68/3

There are thousands of additional font styles in the Adobe Type 1 font-file format that are available for use with the OS/2 operating system. These fonts require two files for each typeface. These files have an AFM and PFB file-name extension. The Font Palette converts the AFM file to an OFM file when it installs the new font. Note: If the set of fonts you want to install is supplied on multiple diskettes, you might need to copy the files into a temporary directory, because the font installation process requires that both files for a given typeface be available at the same time. To add more fonts to your system:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Font Palette.
  4. Select Edit font.  The Edit Font window appears.
  5. Select Add.
  6. Follow the instructions on the Add Font window; then select Add.
  7. Select the names of the font files that you want to install on your
     system.
  8. Select Add.
  9. Point to the title-bar icon.
 10. Double-click.

See Selecting Sample Typefaces for the Font Palette if you want to add one of the new typefaces to the Font Palette samples.

Removing Fonts from Your System 69/3

To remove a font from your system:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Font Palette.
  4. Select Edit font.  The Edit Font window appears.
  5. Select Delete.
  6. Select the names of the font files that you want to delete from your
     system.
  7. Select Delete.
  8. When the files have been deleted, point to the title-bar icon.
  9. Double-click.

Note: Removing a font deletes the corresponding files from your hard disk unless they are needed by the Windows Adobe Type Manager. For more information about the Windows Adobe Type Manager, see the online Windows Programs in OS/2 book located in the Information folder.

Keyboard 70/2

The Keyboard object is used to adjust the blink rate of the cursor, change the speed at which a key repeats when held down, and customize the keyboard to make it easier to use for those with special needs. To customize the keyboard:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Keyboard.
  4. Select the tab for the setting you want to change.
  5. Point to the title-bar icon.
  6. Double-click.

Note: If the keyboard speed is set in Windows, when that WIN-OS/2 session is started, the keyboard speed for the entire system is reset and remains reset even after that WIN-OS/2 session is closed.

Select the Special Needs tab to change the settings to meet your special requirements. For example, you can make keys "sticky" so that you can press and release a series of keys (for example, Ctrl+Alt+Del) sequentially but have the keys operate as if the keys were pressed and released at the same time.

To enable sticky keys:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Keyboard.
  4. Select Special Needs.
  5. Select the Settings activation On radio button.
  6. For each key you want to act as a sticky key, press Shift three times;
     then press the key you want to stay stuck down.
  7. Repeat the previous step for each key that you want to operate as a sticky
     key.
  8. Point to the title-bar icon.
  9. Double-click.

To deactivate sticky keys, press and release each sticky key once.

Add Programs 71/2

Some programs do not place a program object in a folder or on the Desktop during their installation. Without the object, you cannot use the Workplace Shell to start the program. To correct this situation, you can use the Add Programs object. Add Programs uses a database to identify possible programs, set the correct DOS settings, and select an appropriate program object for the newly added OS/2, DOS, and Windows programs. You can create your own database to be used with Add Programs. For more information, see the OS/2 Tutorial, the help information provided with Add Programs or the Master Help Index. To add programs to the Desktop:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Add Programs.  The Add Programs to the Desktop window appears.
  4. Select Add new programs
  5. Select Ok.  A message is displayed when the process is complete.
  6. Select Ok.

The Add Programs program creates a DOS Programs folder, a Windows Programs folder, and a Windows Groups folder. Some Windows groups contain DOS programs. After you add them to the Desktop, these DOS program objects are placed in the WIN-OS/2 Groups folder and also in a DOS folder if you added DOS programs.

    Tip If your computer had a previous version of the OS/2 operating system,
    you might see a folder on your Desktop with the same name as one of your
    old groups.  This folder contains program objects that represent your old
    programs; however, Add Programs also puts these programs and program
    objects in new folders (DOS Programs or Windows Programs folders).
    Use the program objects in these new folders rather than the old group name
    folders because the preselected settings will work best for the performance
    of your program.

Mouse 72/2

The Mouse object is used to change the behavior of your mouse. You can:

  • Control the speed of the mouse pointer
  • Change the look of the pointer
  • Change the length, size and color of the pointer tail
  • Change the mouse for left-hand use
  • Customize the Alt, Shift, and Ctrl key combinations
  • Change the length and look of the mouse pointer tail

Note: You can change the speed of your mouse for your Windows sessions using the Windows Control Panel. Use the OS/2 Tutorial for an interactive demonstration of how to customize mouse settings.

To change the mouse settings:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Mouse.

Use the Timings page to change the speed at which actions occur when you use the mouse. Use the Setup page to customize the mouse for left-hand use or right-hand use. If you change the setting, the button settings on the Mappings page are automatically updated; however, you also can use the Mappings page to customize them individually. Use the Comet Cursor page to change the length and look of the mouse pointer's tail.

Tip Using the Selective Install object in the System Setup folder, you can reconfigure the operating system to support another pointing device without having to reinstall the entire operating system (see Selective Install).

Scheme Palette 73/2+

The Scheme Palette contains many different predefined color schemes. Each scheme has a preset color for the following:

  • Desktop
  • Titles of the objects on the Desktop and in folders
  • Different parts of the windows such as push buttons, scroll bars, and the background.

You can use these schemes as they are, or you can change their colors. In addition, you can also use the Scheme Palette to change the width of the borders around the windows, and the font used.

Changing Color Schemes 74/3

To use a predefined scheme to change the colors of one folder or window:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Scheme Palette.
  4. Make sure that the folder or window you want to change is visible.
  5. Point to a scheme on the palette.
  6. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  7. Drag the color scheme to the window.
  8. Release mouse button 2. The window colors change to the new scheme.

Globally Changing Color Schemes 75/3

To use one of the predefined schemes to change the colors for all the folders that do not have their colors individually set:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Scheme Palette.
  4. Point to a scheme on the palette.
  5. Press and hold Alt.
  6. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  7. Drag the color scheme to the Desktop.
  8. Release mouse button 2.
  9. Release Alt. The colors change to the new scheme.

Changing the Colors on the Scheme Palette 76/3

To change the colors within a scheme on the Scheme Palette:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Scheme Palette.
  4. Select the scheme on the Scheme Palette that you want to change.
  5. Select Edit Scheme.
  6. Select the part of the window (in the Window area field) whose color you want to change.
  7. Select Edit Color. A window appears in which you can make adjustments to or change the color. (For more information about the choices available in this window, select the Help push button.)
  8. Adjust the color until the correct color appears in the box on the color bar in the window.
  9. Point to the title-bar icon.
  10. Double-click. The selected window part changes to the new color on the Scheme Palette.
  11. When all the color changes have been made, point to the title-bar icon.
  12. Double-click.

Tip You can point to an area on the sample palette and click mouse button 2 to select the part of the window to be changed, instead of using the Window area field to select it. This reduces the amount of scrolling needed to find the correct window part.

Changing the Fonts in a Scheme 77/3

To change the font of text within the scheme:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Scheme Palette.
  4. Select the scheme on the Scheme Palette that you want to change.
  5. Select Edit Scheme.
  6. Select the part of the window (in the Window area field) whose font you
     want to change.
  7. Select Edit Font.
  8. Select the name, style, size, and emphasis that you want to use.
  9. Point to the title-bar icon.
 10. Double-click.  The font of the selected window part changes on the Scheme
     Palette.  For more information about fonts, see Font Palette.
    Tip To display a colorful picture (bit map) on the background of your
    folder windows or the Desktop folder:
      1. Display the pop-up menu for a folder.
      2. Select Settings.
      3. Select the Background tab.
      4. Select the Image radio button in the Background type field.
      5. Select the arrow to the right of the Image File field.
      6. Select a file with a .BMP file-name extension.
    The image appears in the background of your folder.

Sound 78/2

The Sound object is used by an application to generate a warning beep. The beep can be turned off. You can indicate whether a beep should be heard when a warning message is displayed or an invalid key is pressed. To customize the sound settings:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Sound.

Note: If you install OS/2 Multimedia additional sound options are available.

For more information, see the online Multimedia book.

Spooler 79/2+

The Spooler stores jobs that are waiting for an available printer or port. OS/2 includes a spooler for printouts you request in OS/2, DOS, and Windows sessions (an instance of a command prompt or started program). When you print, the system creates a spool file which is held in place in the SPOOL directory. The SPOOL directory is created by the system during installation. You can use the Spooler object to change the location of the spooler path and to disable or enable the spooler.

Enabling the Spooler 80/3

To enable the spooler:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Spooler.
  4. Point to the title-bar icon.
  5. Click mouse button 2.
  6. Select Disable spooler
  7. Point to the title-bar icon.
  8. Double-click. (Spooling takes effect immediately.  You do not need to
     restart your system.)

Changing the Spooler Path 81/3

Use this procedure if you print often, or if you print large jobs and need a separate storage area, such as a large disk, for spool files. Be sure to wait until all your jobs finish printing, or delete any pending jobs.

To change the spooler path:

  1. Select all the printer objects.
  2. Select Hold from the pop-up menu of each printer object.
  3. Open OS/2 System.
  4. Open System Setup.
  5. Open Spooler. By default, the Spooler Settings notebook appears.
  6. Select Spool path.
  7. In the Spool path field, type the new path.
  8. Point to the title-bar icon.
  9. Double-click.

Changing the Print Priority 82/3

You can set the print priority higher or lower to adjust the speed at which spooled print jobs are printed.

To set the print priority:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Spooler. By default, the Spooler Settings notebook appears.
  4. Select the Print priority page.
  5. Move the slider arm to select priority.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Disabling the Spooler 83/3

You might want to disable the spooler to print jobs that have a high-security risk. Disabling the spooler prevents others from viewing your print jobs in a printer-object window. However, you cannot disable spooling to a network printer on a network server.

To disable the spooler:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Spooler.
  4. Point to the title-bar icon.
  5. Click mouse button 2.
  6. Select Enable spooler.
  7. Restart your system.

When the Spooler is disabled, your print jobs go directly to a printer. However, a printout might contain material from different jobs mixed together.

System 84/2+

The System object is used to change system defaults. You can select how you want a window that is already open to be displayed and where you want windows that you have minimized to be displayed. This notebook is also used to specify confirmation messages and to turn off the product information window. For more information about each tab, select the help push button provided on each page.

Confirming Delete Actions 85/3

To specify if you want a confirmation message displayed each time you delete an object or a folder:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Confirmations tab.
  5. Place a check mark next to each item you want a confirmation message for.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Directing Keyboard and Mouse Activity 86/3

To enable or disable the direction of any keyboard and mouse activity during the startup of any Presentation Manager program.

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Input tab.
  5. Place a check mark next to Enable type ahead or Disable type ahead. (The default is Enable type ahead.)
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Resolving Title Conflicts 87/3

To specify how the system is to respond to title conflicts if you create, copy, or move an object into a folder that already has an object with the same name:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Title tab.
  5. Select the choice that best describe how you want the system to respond when a title conflict appears.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Changing System Defaults 88/3

To change the system defaults for a window:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Window tab.
  5. Select the choices that best describe how you want the windows to behave.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Printing a Screen 89/3

To be able to print the information in an open window:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Print Screen tab.
  5. Select Enable.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

To print the open window:

  1. Select the open window.
  2. Press Print Screen.

Displaying Logos 90/3

To specify if you want a logo to be displayed and how long to display it:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Logo tab.
  5. Select the choices that best describes how you want the system to handle product information and logos.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Changing Screen Resolution 91/3

To change the screen resolution for an XGA display adapter:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Screen tab.
  5. Select the resolution you want to use.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Note: The Screen tab will not appear if you are using the VGA, 8514, or SVGA driver.

Tip After changing screen resolutions from a higher resolution to a lower resolution, some applications might open windows that are partially off the screen. If this occurs:

  1. Press Alt+Spacebar.
  2. Select Move.
  3. Use the mouse or the arrow keys to move the window.
  4. Click mouse button 1 or press Enter.

or:

  1. Point to an empty area on the Desktop.
  2. Click mouse buttons 1 and 2 at the same time.
  3. Point to the name of the program.
  4. Click mouse button 2.
  5. Select Tile or Cascade. The window will now appear on the screen.

System Clock 92/2

The System Clock object is used to set the system date and time or to set an alarm. You can display the clock in either analog or digital mode.

To set the system clock:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Select System Clock.
  4. Display the pop-up menu for System Clock.
  5. Select Settings.
  6. Select the tab for the setting you want to change.
  7. Select View; change to the View page if necessary. (To view a different View page, use an arrow at the lower-right corner of the window.)
  8. Point to the title-bar icon.
  9. Double-click.

WIN-OS/2 Setup 93/2

The WIN-OS/2 Setup object is used to select a public or private clipboard or dynamic data exchange (DDE). The clipboard and DDE are features that allow data exchange between programs. You also can use this object to preselect WIN-OS/2 settings for all Windows programs before you start them. Use the Fast load setting to automatically start a WIN-OS/2 session when you start OS/2. If you change a setting, the change affects only subsequent Windows programs that are started. Programs that are currently running are not affected.

If you are using Windows programs that can share information using the clipboard or Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) feature, then you can change the way these features work in all WIN-OS/2 sessions.

Note: Be sure you check with the instructions that came with your program to determine if these features are supported.

The clipboard is an area that temporarily holds data. Data is placed in the clipboard by selecting cut or copy from a menu. You can cut (move) or copy data from one document and paste it into another document, even if the other document is in a different program. For example, you can place a spreadsheet from one program into a document from another program.

The DDE feature enables the exchange of data between programs. Any change made to information in one file is applied to the same information in an associated file. In the example above, if changes are made to the original spreadsheet, corresponding changes are made to the spreadsheet in the document. If changes are made to the spreadsheet in the document, corresponding changes are made to the original spreadsheet.

The clipboard and DDE can be set to Public or Private. When DDE is set to Public, information can be shared with OS/2 and WIN-OS/2 sessions. Information cannot be shared with DOS sessions. When the clipboard or DDE is set to Private, sharing data between sessions is restricted. This means that only information for those programs running in that single session can be shared.

When OS/2 is installed, the clipboard and DDE are set to Public. Windows programs that have the clipboard or DDE feature are set up during installation of the OS/2 operating system to use a Public setting for all WIN-OS/2 sessions. You can use the WIN-OS/2 Setup object to set these features to private. You can further customize the way you use these features by using the Settings notebook of the program object.

Note: Changing the clipboard and DDE features to Private will not affect the performance of your Windows programs.

To change the clipboard or DDE feature to Private:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open WIN-OS/2 Setup.
  4. Select Data Exchange.
  5. Select Private for Dynamic Data Exchange or Clipboard.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Note: If you change the settings for the clipboard or DDE while a program is running in a WIN-OS/2 session, the settings for the program will take effect immediately.

For related information about the clipboard, DDE, WIN-OS/2, and Windows Programs, see the Windows Programs in OS/2 located in the online Information folder or the Master Help Index.

Power 94/2+

The Power object manages and tracks power consumption in battery-powered computers that support the Advanced Power Management (APM) standard. The APM standard defines the way the hardware and software work together to reduce power consumption and help extend battery life. If your computer supports the APM standard, the Power object might be automatically installed during the OS/2 installation process. If it was not installed, you can install it by using Selective Install and selecting Advanced Power Management. For information about Selective Install, see Selective Install.

Note: This power management feature is not available if your computer does not have APM BIOS or a device driver that emulates APM BIOS.

OS/2 APM support relies on the power status information returned from the BIOS on your computer. You might notice incorrect battery life or status within the Power icon on your computer. If this occurs, rely on the LEDs on your computer for accurate power status information.

Turning the APM setting to Off also turns off the BIOS power management. If you want to turn off APM, but not the BIOS power management, place REM before the APM device driver statement in your CONFIG.SYS file, and then restart your system to invoke the change.

For example:

REM DEVICE=C:\OS2\APM.SYS

Power Object 95/3

To open the Power object:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Power.

To display the Power pop-up menu:

  1. Point to the Power object.
  2. Click mouse button 1 or 2.

Power Settings 96/3

To set power management support:

  1. Display the Power object pop-up menu.
  2. Select Settings. The Power - Settings notebook appears.
  3. Select Power.
  4. Set Power management to On or Off. If set to On, power consumption will be reduced and power status will be tracked. If set to Off, the suspend mode, power status, and battery status features are disabled.
  5. Set Confirm on power state changes if you want to confirm requests to go to suspend mode. (See Suspend Mode.)

To set the default status view of the status window:

  1. Display the Power object pop-up menu.
  2. Select Settings. The Power - Settings notebook appears.
  3. Select View.
  4. Select Full status or Battery only for Default status view.
  5. Set Refresh (of the status window) to On or Off.
  6. If you set Refresh to On, select the number of minutes (from 1 to 30) for Refresh rate. The system will automatically update the status window at the intervals you specified.

You can also update the status window by selecting Refresh Now from the Power object pop-up menu.

Power Status 97/3

To display the power status:

  1. Display the Power object pop-up menu.
  2. Select the arrow to the right of Open.
  3. Select Full status or Battery status. A full-status Power window or a power-gauge Power window is displayed, depending on your selection.

Note: You cannot change the size of the Power window.

A full-status Power window displays the following information:

  • Battery life. This information is displayed as a power gauge that shows the power level of the battery compared to the capacity of the battery. When the power gauge indicator is completely shaded, the battery is at full power. The shaded area of the gauge moves up or down as the battery power level increases or decreases. When the power gauge indicator is dimmed, there is no battery in the computer or the computer cannot provide battery information.
  • Power source for the computer. If the system cannot determine the power source, no power source information is displayed.
  • Battery state, which is the charge state of the battery. Battery state information is displayed as follows:
High        Battery charge is OK; continue using your computer.
Low         Recharge the battery or switch to another power source
            such as another battery or AC power.
Critical    Battery charge is depleted.  Recharge the battery or
            switch to another power source immediately to avoid a
            system failure or data loss.
Charging    System is restoring the battery charge.
Unknown     System cannot determine the battery state or there is no
            battery in your computer.

Suspend Mode 98/3

To set the suspend mode:

  1. Display the Power object pop-up menu.
  2. Select Suspend.

When suspend mode is activated, battery power is conserved by dimming the display and turning off devices that are not in use. If Confirm on power status changes is set in the Power - Settings notebook, a message is displayed that asks you if you want to continue before switching to suspend mode.

Note: Different computers have different procedures for exiting suspend mode and resuming operation. Refer to the documentation that came with your computer for information about its suspend mode features.

After you exit suspend mode, you will notice a startup delay before you can resume operation of your system. This delay might be a few seconds, depending on your system.

Selective Install 99/2+

The Selective Install object is used to add features that you did not include when you originally installed the operating system. You also can use the Selective Install object to change the mouse, display adapter, or country information for your system.

Note: You will need the OS/2 installation diskettes for each of the procedures that follow.

Adding Options after Installation 100/3

To add options after installation:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Selective Install.
  4. Select from the System Configuration window any of the choices that you want to change or add.
  5. Select OK.
  6. Place a check mark to the left of any feature you want to add. (For more information about a feature, press F1.) If a More push button is displayed to the right of a feature, select it to see additional choices.

Adding Online Documentation after Installation 101/3

To add online documentation after installation:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Selective Install.
  4. Select OK when the System Configuration window is displayed.
  5. Select the check box to the left of Documentation.
  6. Select More to the right of Documentation.
  7. Select the check box to the left of any documentation units to deselect the ones you do not want to add.
  8. Select OK.
  9. Select Install.
  10. Follow the instructions on the screen.

Changing Display Adapter Support 102/3

To change the display adapter support after installation:

1. Open OS/2 System.
2. Open System Setup.
3. Open Selective Install.
4. Select Primary Display or Secondary Display from the System Configuration
   window.
5. Select the display adapter that you want from the list provided.
6. Select OK.
7. Follow the instructions on the screen.

Adding PCMCIA Support after Installation 103/3

To add PCMCIA** support after installation:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Selective Install.
  4. Select OK when the System Configuration window is displayed.
  5. Select the check box to the left of PCMCIA Support to display the Select
     PCMCIA system window.
  6. Select the appropriate system (this should either be a direct match with
     your target install system or a known compatible system).
  7. Select OK.
  8. Select Install.
  9. Follow the instructions on the screen.

PCMCIA 104/2+

OS/2 provides software support for Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) hardware. PCMCIA is the standard for PC card adapters associated with portable computers. A PC card is a small form-factor adapter about the size and shape of a credit card. You can use PC cards with laptops, notebooks, tablets, and other portable computer systems that are equipped with a PCMCIA slot.

Installing PCMCIA 105/3

PCMCIA can be automatically installed during OS/2 installation or it can be installed through Selective Install after OS/2 installation. To install PCMCIA support after installation, see Adding PCMCIA Support after Installation.

PCMCIA Components 106/3

PCMCIA consists of the following services and client device drivers (CDDs):

  • Card services - Provide an industry-standard interface layer between the Client device driver (CDD) and hardware-specific socket services.
  • Socket services - Provide an industry-standard interface layer across hardware platforms for specific chip-set support.
  • Resource Client - A special-purpose CDD that provides Card Services, detailing the resources in use and available at start up.
  • Modem Card Manager - A generic CDD that provides a Card Manager level of support for PCMCIA modem cards.

Plug and Play for PCMCIA 107/3+

Plug and Play for PCMCIA is an OS/2 application that displays PC card information, socket status, assigned resources, and card type. There are two basic types of PC cards:

  • Memory cards, which contain specific types of memory devices
  • Input/output (I/O) cards, which contain devices such as modems and disks

Both card types are assigned system resources, which are used to communicate with the card's devices.

Plug and Play for PCMCIA also allows you to start applications automatically when their objects (icons) are registered to a PC card type.

To open the Plug and Play for PCMCIA object:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Plug and Play for PCMCIA.

Socket and Card Information 108/4

The Plug and Play for PCMCIA window displays the following information:

No.           Socket number.
Card Type     Card-type icon and text.
Card Status   Card-status icon and text.

Card Types 109/4

o  Booted
o  Communication - for the following card types:
          3270          5250
          Ethernet      LAN
          SDLC          Token Ring
o  Hard Disk
o  I/O - for multi-function, parallel, and SCSI card types.
o  Memory
o  Modem, Serial

Card Status 110/4

o  Empty
o  Inserted
o  Ready
o  Not Ready
o  Inserted for Memory

Memory Card - Details View 111/4

To receive additional information about an inserted memory card:

  1. Select the memory card.
  2. Press Enter.

The Memory Card - Details View appears with the following information:

Card information
Vendor name and card description data retrieved from card.
Write protect
Yes or no.
Battery
Good, low, or dead.
Region
Region of card memory for memory devices such as SRAM.

I/O Card - Details View 112/4

To receive additional information about an inserted I/O-type card:

  1. Select the appropriate card.
  2. Press Enter.

The I/O Card - Details View appears with the following information:

Card information     Vendor name and card description data retrieved from card.
Assigned resources   System resources used by this PC card:
     IRQ    Interrupt request level.
     I/O    Input/output ports.

Options 113/3+

The Options menu bar choice has two selections, Customize and Register Object. The Customize option allows you to turn a beep on and off, display the Plug and Play for PCMCIA window when a PC card is used, and keep Plug and Play for PCMCIA visible when other applications are running in the foreground. The Register Object option allows you to register objects to be launched (started or opened) when a specific type of PC card is used. (It is not necessary to have a card inserted when registering objects.) If more than one object is registered to the same card type or the manual option is selected, the Object Launcher window is displayed where you can select which registered object to launch.

Note: Objects can be launched only after Plug and Play for PCMCIA is opened.

Customize 114/4

To use the Customize window:

  1. Select Options.
  2. Select Customize.
  3. To display the Plug and Play for PCMCIA window whenever a PC card is
     inserted, removed, ready, or not ready, select the appropriate check box
     under Display window.
  4. To hear a beep whenever a PC card is inserted, removed, ready, or not
     ready, select the appropriate check box under Beep.
  5. To keep the Plug and Play for PCMCIA icon or window in the foreground
     (visible) when running another application, select Yes.
  6. To return to the original default settings, select Defaults.
Note:  Plug and Play for PCMCIA must be open for your selections to become
active.

Register Object 115/4

To register an object:

  1. Select Options.
  2. Select Register Object.
  3. Click on the down arrow to the right of the Select a card type field to
     display a list of available card types.
  4. Select the desired card type.
  5. Drag a copy of each object that you want to register to this card type to
     the Object List field.  The name of the object appears in the list.  (If
     you have registered more than one object for this card type, see also
     Object Launcher.)
  6. Select Automatically or Manually to indicate how you would like the object
     to be launched.  (If you have selected Manually, see also Object
     Launcher.)
  7. Select any of the choices under When card is to indicate when you would
     like to launch the object.
     Note:  The Ready and Not ready choices work only with I/O card types.
  8. To return to the original default settings, select Defaults.

To deregister an object:

  1. Select the object to be removed from the Object List.
  2. Select Remove.
     Note:  Selecting Remove does not affect the original object.

Object Launcher 116/3

The Object Launcher is displayed when Plug and Play for PCMCIA is open and one or both of the following occurs:

  o  More than one object is registered for the inserted PC card type.
  o  Manually is selected under Launch Choices.

To launch an object:

  1. Select the object to launch.
  2. Select Launch.

Selective Uninstall 117/2

The Selective Uninstall program allows you to remove operating system files, programs, and device drivers from your hard disk. You might want to uninstall files to free hard disk space for other programs. Warning: Do not remove operating system files, programs, or device drivers from your hard disk unless you have backed up the operating system (as it was originally installed). Use the BACKUP.EXE program from the utility diskettes you created with "Create Utility Diskettes" program to back up your system. After system files, programs, or device drivers are removed, they are unavailable for future use. You can recover files, programs, or device drivers that you delete (as they were originally installed) only by using the RESTORE.EXE file from the Utility Diskettes you created.

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Locate the Selective Uninstall object inside the System Setup folder.
  4. Open Selective Uninstall.  The Selective Uninstall window appears.

For information about Selective Uninstall, press F1. Or, place the mouse pointer on the Help push button and click once. To close the Help window, press Esc.

  1. To make a selection, press the Tab key until your choice is highlighted;
     then press the Spacebar. A check mark (/) appears in the box next to your
     choice.  Or, place the mouse pointer on the check box beside a choice and
     click once.
  2. The More push button next to some choices indicates that a secondary
     window containing more choices associated with your selection is
     available. After you select a choice, the More push button is highlighted.
     Select More to display a list of items you can choose to remove.
     Warning: When you select More, all items in the associated choices l   ist
     are checked. Make sure you remove the check marks from those items that
     you do not want to delete from your hard disk.
     For information about the items in the window, press F1.  Or, place the
     mouse pointer on the Help push button and click once.
  3. Follow the instructions on the screen to remove operating system features
     from your hard disk.
    Adobe Type Manager
    Your hard disk contains the Adobe Type Manager program.  The program runs
    in the WIN-OS/2 environment.  Adobe Type Manager uses PostScript[**]
    outline font technology to produce the sharpest possible type on the screen
    and on the printed page.
    If you intend to use Adobe Type Manager, do not choose to uninstall Fonts.
    For more information about using Adobe Type Manager, see the online Windows
    Programs in OS/2 located in the Information folder on the desktop.

Create Utility Diskettes 118/2

The OS/2 operating system comes installed on your hard disk. Your computer has a program that creates diskettes called Utility Diskettes. Create these diskettes to help you correct problems if you cannot start your computer from the hard disk. The Utility Diskettes also allow you to start the procedure that backs up the operating system to diskettes. Backup diskettes allow you to restore OS/2 to your hard disk in the event of a computer problem. To complete this procedure, you will need three blank, high-density (2MB) diskettes for a 1.44MB drive, or one extended-density (4MB) diskette for a 2.88MB drive.

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Create Utility Diskettes. The Create Utility Diskettes window
     appears.
     For information about Create Utility Diskettes, press F1.  Or, place the
     mouse pointer on the Help push button and click once.  To close the Help
     window, press Esc.
  4. Select the drive where the Utility Diskettes will be created.  If you
     select drive A, insert a blank diskette into drive A.
  5. Type C.  Or, place the mouse pointer on the Create push button and click
     once.  Follow the instructions on the screen to prepare Utility Diskettes.
     Label the first diskette you create Utility Diskette 1, the second
     diskette Utility Diskette 2, and the third diskette Utility Diskette 3.
     Store the diskettes in a safe place.

Starting Objects Automatically 119/1+

The Startup folder contains objects that you want to automatically start every time the system starts. This chapter describes how to use the Startup folder to start objects. It also describes how to customize your system startup by placing variables in your CONFIG.SYS file.

Starting Programs Automatically 120/2+

You can start programs automatically at system startup using a Startup folder, a STARTUP.CMD file, or both. Use the OS/2 Tutorial for an interactive demonstration of how to use the Startup folder.

Startup Folder 121/3

You can place objects of frequently used programs and batch files in a Startup folder so that every time you start your computer, the programs and batch files will start. The objects in the Startup folder are started when the Desktop folder is opened at system startup. You cannot specify the order in which the objects in the folder are started. You should place a shadow of the program objects in the Startup folder instead of the original object. This ensures that any changes made to the original object are applied to the object in the Startup folder. To create a shadow of an object and place it in the Startup folder:

  1. Point to the object.
  2. Press and hold Ctrl+Shift.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the object to the Startup folder.
  5. Release mouse button 2.
  6. Release the Ctrl and Shift keys.

STARTUP.CMD File 122/3

A STARTUP.CMD file is similar to the Startup folder in that it is used to automatically start programs and batch files at system startup. If a STARTUP.CMD file is present, it will be run prior to the starting of the Desktop. For more information about creating and running a STARTUP.CMD file, refer to the online Command Reference.

Preventing Automatic Startup 123/2

Programs located in the Startup folder or programs running at the time the computer was shut down will automatically start when the computer is restarted. To prevent these programs from starting:

  1. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the computer.
  2. When you see the Desktop animation (similar to an exploding box), press
     and hold Ctrl+Shift+F1.
  3. Hold the keys for approximately 15 seconds, or until the Desktop appears.
     (If the hard disk light stops flashing during this time, your computer
     might be suspended.  Release the keys quickly, and then resume holding the
     keys until the Desktop objects appear.)

Customizing Your CONFIG.SYS for Startup 124/2

You can customize the way your Workplace Shell starts by changing the system variables at either a command prompt or in the CONFIG.SYS file. Precede each of the variables with the SET command. The system variables for the Workplace Shell are:

AUTOSTART            Determines the parts of the Workplace Shell that are
                     automatically started.  Eliminating any of the options
                     from the statement restricts the user from accessing
                     portions of the Shell.  For example:
                     SET AUTOSTART=FOLDERS, PROGRAMS, TASKLIST, CONNECTIONS
     FOLDERS           Allows a user to open additional folders after startup.
     PROGRAMS          Allows a user to open additional programs after startup.
     TASKLIST          Allows a user to open the Window List.
     CONNECTIONS       Recreates the network connections established during the
                       last log on.
     LAUNCHPAD         Creates a new LaunchPad on the Desktop.
OS2_SHELL            Sets the command processor for OS/2 sessions.  For
                     example:
                     SET OS2_SHELL=C:\OS2\CMD.EXE
RESTARTOBJECTS       Sets the objects that will be automatically started by the
                     Workplace Shell.  For example:
                     SET RESTARTOBJECTS=STARTUPFOLDERSONLY
     YES Starts all the objects that were running at the time of shutdown and
     all objects in the Startup folder.  This is the default.
     NO Does not start any of the applications that were running at the time of
     shutdown and does not start the objects in the Startup folder.
     STARTUPFOLDERSONLY Starts only those objects in the Startup folder.
     REBOOTONLY Starts objects only when the Workplace Shell is started by
     pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del or turning on the computer.
RUNWORKPLACE         Sets the interface that is started by the OS/2 operating
                     system. PMSHELL.EXE is the program for the Workplace Shell
                     interface.  For example:
                     SET RUNWORKPLACE=C:\OS2\PMSHELL.EXE
SYSTEM_INI           Determines the INI file to be used by the Workplace Shell
                     for system information about such items as default colors
                     and printer drivers. For example:
                     SET SYSTEM_INI=C:\OS2\OS2SYS.INI
USER_INI             Determines the INI file to be used by the Workplace Shell
                     for system information about such items as program
                     defaults, display options, and file options.  For example:
                     SET USER_INI=C:\OS2\OS2.INI
For more information about customizing the user interface, refer to the online
Command Reference.
The DISKCACHE statement in the CONFIG.SYS file is set up so that it
automatically runs the CHKDSK program upon startup if the system shuts down
improperly.  The CHKDSK program analyzes and fixes disk problems caused by the
improper shutdown.
If you add hard disk drives or partitions after the installation of the OS/2
operating system, you should edit the CONFIG.SYS file and update the AC:x
parameter to reflect the new additions. AC: starts the auto-check feature on
the specified drives when the system shuts down improperly.  The value x
represents the letters of the disks or partitions on the system that you want
to check.

For example, if you want to check disks C and D and your existing DISKCACHE statement is:

DISKCACHE=64,LW

Add the AC: parameter to the statement as follows:

DISKCACHE=64,LW,AC:CD

For more information about the DISKCACHE statement, refer to the online Command Reference.

Using Disk Drives 125/1+

This chapter describes how to use the Drives folder to access and use the different types of storage media installed in your computer. When opened, the Drives folder provides a view of all drive objects in the system. For example, the following drive types could be accessed from the Drives folder:

  o  Diskette
  o  Hard disk
  o  CD-ROM
  o  Tape backup
  o  Optical disc
  o  PCMCIA

To view the Drive objects:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Drives.

Note: Drive objects cannot be copied.

About Hard Disks and Diskettes 126/2

There are two kinds of disks:

Hard disk   A non-removable disk that is built into a hard-disk drive.  Hard
            disks come in a variety of capacities and can hold large amounts of
            information.  (Capacity is the maximum amount of information that a
            diskette or disk can hold.)
            Information can be stored on and erased from the disk over and over
            again.  The computer can write to and read information from the
            hard disk much faster than it can from a diskette.
Diskette    A removable disk that can be inserted in and removed from a
            diskette drive.  Diskettes come in a variety of capacities.
            Diskettes cannot hold as much information as a hard disk.
            Information can be stored on and erased from the diskette over and
            over again.  The computer cannot write to or read information from
            a diskette as fast as it can from a hard disk.  There are two sizes
            of diskettes, 5.25" and 3.5":
  o  5.25-inch diskettes are thin, flexible, and somewhat fragile.  A 5.25-inch
     diskette has a write-protect notch located on the right side. You can
     place a write-protect tab over the notch to protect the information stored
     on the diskette.
     To store information on or erase information from the diskette, you must
     remove the write-protect tab from the diskette.
  o  3.5-inch diskettes are protected by a hard plastic cover that makes them
     more durable.  A 3.5-inch diskette can be write protected by sliding a
     built-in tab to reveal the write-protect opening.
     To store information on or erase information from the diskette, you must
     slide the tab over the write-protect opening on the diskette.
            Note:  If a diskette does not have a write-protect notch or tab,
            the diskette is permanently write protected.  Many software
            manufacturers use permanently write-protected diskettes to prevent
            the information on the diskettes from being accidentally changed or
            deleted.
The capacity of a diskette and a hard disk is measured in bytes. A diskette
must be formatted at a capacity less than or equal to the capacity of the
diskette drive in order for the diskette and the drive to be compatible.  So
even though a diskette is the correct size physically, its capacity might not
be compatible with the diskette drive in the computer.
For example, a 3.5-inch diskette drive designed to work with 2.88MB diskettes
can use 1.44MB diskettes, but a 1.44MB diskette drive cannot use a 2.88MB
diskette.  The following terms are used to describe the capacity of disks and
the size of files:
Byte        Amount of space it takes to store a character.
Kilobyte    1024 bytes and is abbreviated as KB.
Megabyte    1024KB (approximately a million bytes) and is abbreviated as MB.
Gigabyte    1024MB (approximately a billion bytes) and is abbreviated as GB.
The following terms are equivalent:
1MB = 1024KB = 1048576 bytes
Each diskette drive and hard disk drive in a computer has a letter assigned to
it.  This letter is the name that both you and the computer use to identify the
drive.  For example, on many computers the diskette drive is called drive A and
the hard disk drive is called drive C.

Accessing Hard Disks and Diskettes 127/2+

You can use the Drives folder to access the information on your hard disk and diskette drives. This allows you to view disk information, display the files on the disks, and copy and move files. The files can be viewed as objects so they can easily be copied and moved with the mouse.

Tip For specific instructions on using the Drive A object, see Drive A.

Viewing Disk Information 128/3

To view the size of a disk:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Drives.
  3. Open the drive object you want information about.

Displaying Objects 129/3

The drive objects are used to display the contents of the drives on your computer. The contents of the drive can be displayed in three different views:

Icon view     Displays the contents of the disk as icons.  This is the default
              if the disk does not have folders (directories).
Tree view     Displays the contents of the disk in a tree.  This is the default
              if the disk has folders (directories).  A plus (+) sign to the
              left of a folder indicates that additional folders exist inside
              the folder.  By selecting the plus sign, you can see the other
              folders in the folder.  Pointing to a folder and double-clicking
              displays the contents of the folder in an icon view.
              Note:  When an additional folder is opened from a folder that is
              in tree view, if the default for the additional folder is also
              tree view, it is overridden and displayed in an icon view.  There
              is no need to open it again in tree view because it is already
              shown in the parent folder's tree view.
Details view  Displays the contents of the disk in a table with the following
              additional information:
  o  Icon
  o  Title
  o  Real name
  o  Size
  o  Last write date and time
  o  Last access date and time
  o  Creation date and time
  o  Flags
To display the contents of a drive as icons:
  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Drives.
  3. Point to the object that you want to display.
  4. Click mouse button 2.
  5. Select the arrow to the right of Open.
  6. Select Icon view.
To display the contents of a drive in a tree view:
  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Drives.
  3. Point to the object that you want to display.
  4. Click mouse button 2.
  5. Select the arrow to the right of Open.
  6. Select Tree view.
  7. If a plus (+) sign appears to the left of a folder, select it to expand
     the contents.
  8. To display the contents of a folder, point to the folder; then
     double-click.
To display details about the contents of a drive:
  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Drives.
  3. Point to the object that you want to display.
  4. Click mouse button 2.
  5. Select the arrow to the right of Open.
  6. Select Details view.
  7. Select the scroll bars at the bottom and side of the window to scroll the
     information.

Copying Objects 130/3

Note: If you want to copy the object to a folder object or another drive object, the target object must be visible before you start the copy.

To copy an object from a drive to another location:
  1. Open the drive containing the object you want to copy.
  2. Point to the object you want to copy.
  3. Press and hold Ctrl.
  4. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  5. Drag the object to a folder, the Desktop, or another drive object.
  6. Release mouse button 2.
  7. Release Ctrl.

To copy an object from another location to a drive:

  1. Point to the object you want to copy.
  2. Press and hold Ctrl.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the object to the drive object.
  5. Release mouse button 2.
  6. Release Ctrl.

Moving Objects 131/3

There are times when you need to move an object (copy the object to a different location and delete it from the original location). Note: If you want to move the object to a folder object or another drive object, the target object must be visible before you start the move.

To move an object from a drive to another location:

  1. Open the drive containing the object you want to move.
  2. Point to the object you want to move.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the object to a folder, the Desktop, or another drive object.
  5. Release mouse button 2.

To move an object from another location to a drive:

  1. Point to the object you want to move.
  2. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  3. Drag the mouse to the drive object.
  4. Release mouse button 2.

Deleting Objects from a Drive 132/3

You can delete (erase) unwanted objects from a drive. To delete an object from a drive:

  1. Open the drive.
  2. Point to the object you want to delete.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the object to the Shredder.
  5. Release mouse button 2.

Formatting a Disk 133/2

You can format a disk. When a disk is formatted, it is checked for defects and prepared to accept data. During this process, all existing data is erased from the disk. Use the OS/2 Tutorial for an interactive demonstration of how to format a diskette. Note: Before you format a disk, make sure that it does not contain any information that is important.

To format a disk:
  1. Point to the disk you want to format.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Format disk.
  4. When the Format Disk window appears, type a Volume Label (name for the
     disk).
  5. Select the type of file system (FAT or HPFS) you want to use on the disk.
     (For more information about these file systems, see the Master Help
     Index).
  6. Select Format.
  7. When the format is complete, select OK.

Checking a Disk 134/2

You can check a disk for:

  o  Defects, which are errors in the file allocation table or directory on the
     disk.  If you select Write corrections to disk, any problems found will be
     fixed.
  o  Current usage, which is the amount of the disk used for directories, user
     files, and extended attributes.  It also indicates the amount of space
     that is reserved on the disk.
  o  File system type, which is the type of file system on the disk.
  o  Total disk space, which is the capacity of the disk in bytes.
  o  Total amount of disk space available, which is the amount of free space
     left on the disk.

Note: You cannot check a disk that is currently being used or is locked by another process (for example, the disk that OS/2 is running on).

To check a disk:
  1. Point to the drive that you want to check.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Check disk.
  4. Select Write corrections to disk.
  5. Select Check.  When the check is done, the Check Disk &dash. Results
     window is displayed.
  6. Select Cancel to remove the window.

Drive A 135/2+

The Drive A object provides quick access to the diskette drive in your computer referred to as A. You can use the Drive A object to:

  • Display the objects on a diskette
  • Display information about the objects on the diskette
  • Copy objects on a diskette to another location
  • Copy objects from another location to a diskette
  • Move objects on a diskette to another location
  • Move objects from another location to a diskette
  • Delete objects from a diskette
  • Format a diskette
  • Check a diskette for defects and fix it

Note: The Drive A object cannot be copied.

This chapter discusses only the Drive A object. For information about other drive objects and a discussion about disks and diskettes, see Using Disk Drives.

Displaying the Objects on a Diskette 136/3

To display the objects on a diskette:

  1. Place a diskette into diskette drive A.
  2. Open Drive A.

The Drive A window appears showing the contents of the diskette. The actual layout of the window that appears depends upon the contents of the diskette.

Tree view   Displays the objects on the diskette in a directory (tree)
            structure with folders representing the directories.  This view
            comes up when the objects on the diskette are placed in
            directories.
            To view the contents of a directory, point to a folder and
            double-click.
Icon view   Displays the objects on the diskette as pictures (icons).  This
            view comes up when all the objects on the diskette are in the root
            directory.

Displaying Information about the Objects on a Diskette 137/2

The tree and icon views give limited information about the objects on a diskette. However, the details view gives the following information about the objects on the diskette:

Title of the object   Name that appears below the icon that represents the
                      object.
Real name of object   Actual name of the object.
Size                  Amount of space in bytes that the object occupies.
Last write date       Date that the information in the object was last changed.
Last write time       Time of day that the information in the object was last
                      changed.
Last access date      Date that the information in the object was last viewed.
Last access time      Time of day that the information in the object was last
                      viewed.
Creation date         Date that the object was first created.
Creation time         Time that the object was first created.
Flags                 Characteristics of the file that allow it to be used in a
                      certain way.

To display detailed information about the objects on a diskette:

  1. Place a diskette into drive A.
  2. Open Drive A.
  3. Point to the title-bar icon.
  4. Click mouse button 2.
  5. Select the arrow to the right of Open.
  6. Select Details view.

Copying Objects to or from a Diskette 138/2

There are times when you need to copy an object (duplicate the object and place it in a different location). Note: If you want to copy the object to a folder object or another drive object, the target object must be visible before you start the copy. To copy an object from a diskette in Drive A to another location:

  1. Place a diskette into drive A.
  2. Open Drive A.
  3. Point to the object you want to copy.
  4. Press and hold Ctrl.
  5. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  6. Drag the object to a folder, the Desktop, or another drive object.
  7. Release mouse button 2.
  8. Release Ctrl.
To copy an object from another location to a diskette in Drive A:
  1. Place the diskette you want to copy the object to into drive A.
  2. Point to the object you want to copy.
  3. Press and hold Ctrl.
  4. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  5. Drag the mouse to the Drive A object.
  6. Release mouse button 2.
  7. Release Ctrl.

Moving Objects to or from a Diskette 139/2

There are times when you need to move an object (copy the object to a different location and delete it from the original location). Note: If you want to move the object to a folder object or another drive object, the target object must be visible before you start the move. To move an object from the diskette in Drive A to another location:

  1. Place a diskette into drive A.
  2. Open Drive A.
  3. Point to the object you want to move.
  4. Press and hold Shift.
  5. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  6. Drag the object to a folder, the Desktop, or another drive object.
  7. Release mouse button 2.
  8. Release Shift.

Note: When moving an object from a diskette, the Shift key must be used with mouse button 2. To move an object from another location to the diskette in Drive A:

  1. Place the diskette you want to move the object to into drive A.
  2. Point to the object you want to move.
  3. Press and hold Shift.
  4. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  5. Drag the object to the Drive A object.
  6. Release mouse button 2.
  7. Release Shift.

Note: When moving an object to a diskette, the Shift key must be used with mouse button 2.

Deleting Objects from a Diskette 140/2

You can delete (erase) unwanted objects from a diskette. To delete an object from a diskette:

  1. Place the diskette you want to delete the object from into drive A.
  2. Open Drive A.
  3. Point to the object you want to delete.
  4. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  5. Drag the object to the Shredder.
  6. Release mouse button 2.

Formatting a Diskette 141/2

You can format a diskette using the Drive A object. When a diskette is formatted, it is checked for defects and prepared to accept data. During this process, all existing data is erased from the diskette. To format a diskette:

  1. Place the diskette you want to format into drive A.
  2. Point to Drive A.
  3. Click mouse button 2.
  4. Select Format disk.
  5. When the Format Disk window appears, type a Volume Label (name for the
     disk or diskette).
  6. Select Format.
  7. When the format is complete, select OK.

Checking a Diskette 142/2

You can check a diskette for:

  • Defects, which are errors in the file allocation table or directory on the diskette. If you select Write corrections to disk, any problems found will be fixed.
  • Current usage, which is the amount of the diskette used for directories, user files, and extended attributes. It also indicates the amount of space that is reserved on the diskette.
  • File system type, which is the type of file system on the diskette. (All diskettes are formatted for the FAT file system.)
  • Total disk space, which is the capacity of the diskette in bytes.
  • Total amount of disk space available, which is the amount of free space left on the diskette.

To check a diskette:

  1. Place the diskette to be checked into drive A.
  2. Point to Drive A.
  3. Click mouse button 2.
  4. Select Check disk.
  5. Select Write corrections to disk.
  6. Select Check.
  7. After a few seconds, the Check Disk - Results window is displayed. Select Cancel to remove the window.

Using Command Prompts 143/1+

The Command Prompts folder contains objects that open DOS, OS/2, and WIN-OS/2 sessions. A session is one instance of a command prompt or started program. Each session is separate from all other sessions that might be running on the computer. To open the Command Prompts object:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.

OS/2 Command Prompts 144/2

The OS/2 Full-Screen and OS/2 Window objects are used to access an OS/2 command prompt. At these command prompts, you can start programs and enter OS/2 commands. For a description of OS/2 commands that can be used at these prompts, see the OS/2 Command Reference in the Information folder. To start an OS/2 command prompt session:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open OS/2 Full Screen, OS/2 Window, or both.

When you close a session, the session and its related windows are automatically closed. Make sure that you save all important data in the session before you close it.

To close an OS/2 command prompt session:
  1. Type Exit.
  2. Press Enter.

You can switch (temporarily leave without closing) from an OS/2 command prompt session to another running program. When you switch sessions, your command prompt session is saved and then restored when you switch back.

To temporarily leave an OS/2 command prompt session:
  1. Press Ctrl+Esc.
  2. Point to a title on the Window List.
  3. Double-click.
or:
  1. Press Alt+Esc to switch to another open object.

DOS Command Prompts 145/2

The DOS Full-Screen and DOS Window objects are used to access a DOS command prompt. At these command prompts, you can start programs and enter DOS commands. For a description of DOS commands that can be used at these prompts, see the OS/2 Command Reference in the Information folder. To start a DOS command prompt session:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open DOS Full Screen, DOS Window, or both.

When you close a session, the session and its related windows are automatically closed. Make sure that you save all important data in the session before you close it.

To close a DOS command prompt session:
  1. Type Exit.
  2. Press Enter.

You can switch from a DOS command prompt session to another running program. When you switch sessions, your command prompt session is saved and then restored when you switch back.

To temporarily leave a DOS command prompt session:
  1. Press Ctrl+Esc.
  2. Point to a title on the Window List.
  3. Double-click.
or:
  1. Press Alt+Esc to display the Desktop.

DOS from Drive A 146/2+

The DOS from Drive A object is used to start a specific version (3.0 or later) of DOS from a diskette. By using a specific version of DOS, you can use programs that will not run under the DOS provided with OS/2. Before you can start a specific DOS version from a diskette, you must create the diskette used to start the DOS version. This diskette is commonly known as a DOS Startup diskette or DOS bootable diskette.

Creating a DOS Startup Diskette 147/3

Note: If you already have a DOS Startup diskette, go to step 6 to make sure the diskette is set up to work correctly with the DOS from Drive A object.

To create a DOS Startup diskette:
  1. Boot your system with a version of DOS.  You can use a:
       o  DOS installation diskette
       o  Hard disk that DOS has been installed on
       o  Diskette that DOS has been installed on
  2. Type FORMAT A: /S
  3. Place a blank diskette into drive A.
  4. Press Enter.  This transfers the system files to the diskette.
  5. When the format is complete, remove the diskette.
  6. Start OS/2 by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del.
  7. Select OS/2 System.
  8. Select Drives.
  9. Select Drive C.
 10. Open the OS/2 folder; then open the MDOS folder.
 11. Place the formatted diskette containing the system files into drive A.
 12. Copy the following data-file objects from Drive C to the Drive A object:
       o  FSFILTER.SYS
       o  FSACCESS.EXE You can copy as many additional DOS files to the
         diskette as you want.
 13. Open the Templates folder.
 14. Copy a Data File object to the Desktop.
 15. Point to the data-file object and double-click.  The OS/2 System Editor
     starts.
 16. Type the following information into the data file:
     DEVICE=FSFILTER.SYS
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\MDOS\HIMEM.SYS
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\MDOS\EMM386.SYS
     DOS=HIGH,UMB
     DEVICEHIGH=C:\OS2\MDOS\ANSI.SYS
     FILES=20
     BUFFERS=20
 17. Point to the title-bar icon of the OS/2 System Editor; then double-click.
 18. Select Save as; then type A:\CONFIG.SYS and press Enter.
 19. Point to the data-file object again and double-click.
 20. Type the following information into the data file:
     ECHO OFF
     PROMPT $P$G
     SET COMSPEC=A:\COMMAND.COM
     C:\OS2\MDOS\MOUSE.COM
     PATH A:\
 21. Point to the title-bar icon of the OS/2 System Editor; then double-click.
 22. Select Save as; then type A:\AUTOEXEC.BAT and press Enter.

Starting DOS from Drive A 148/3

To start a DOS from Drive A session:

  1. Insert the DOS Startup diskette in drive A.
  2. Open OS/2 System.
  3. Open Command Prompts.
  4. Open DOS from Drive A.
To close a DOS from Drive A session:
  1. Press Ctrl+Esc.
  2. Point to DOS from Drive A in the Window List.
  3. Click mouse button 2.
  4. Click on Close.
You can switch from a DOS from Drive A session to another running program.
When you switch sessions, your command prompt session is saved and then
restored when you switch back.
To temporarily leave a DOS from Drive A session:
  1. Press Ctrl+Esc.
  2. Point to a title on the Window List.
  3. Double-click.
or:
  1. Press Alt+Esc to display the Desktop.

WIN-OS/2 Full Screen 149/2

The WIN-OS/2 Full-Screen object is used to run multiple Windows programs in a full-screen session. For more information about WIN-OS/2, see the online WIN-OS/2 Book located in the Information folder. To start a WIN-OS/2 Full-Screen session:

  1. open the object.
To close a WIN-OS/2 full-screen session:
  1. Point to the title-bar icon.
  2. Double-click.
To switch to the OS/2 Desktop:
  1. Point to the OS/2 Desktop object in the lower left corner of the screen.
  2. Double-click.

Starting Multiple Sessions 150/2

You can have multiple sessions of any object open. To open more than one session of an object:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Copy one of the objects (for example, DOS Window) by holding down the Ctrl
     key and mouse button 2 and dragging the object to the same or another
     folder.  Then release the mouse button and the Ctrl key.
  4. Open the object to start the session.
  5. Repeat the steps to create and open another session.
Or, if you need multiple copies of objects often, you can alter the settings of
the object so that it creates another session every time you open it.  Do the
following:
  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Point to the object.
  4. Click mouse button 2.
  5. Select Settings.
  6. Select the Window tab.
  7. Select the Create new window radio button.
  8. Close the notebook by double-clicking mouse button 1 on the title-bar
     icon.  Now, each time you select the object a new session starts.

Starting and Exiting BASICA and QBASIC 151/2

To start the BASICA or QBASIC programs: Note: BASICA will only run on IBM computers.

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open OS/2 Full Screen, OS/2 Window, DOS Full Screen, or DOS Window.
  4. Type BASICA or QBASIC at the command prompt; then press Enter.
To exit the BASICA program:
  1. Type SYSTEM.
  2. Press Enter.
To exit the QBASIC program:
  1. Select File.
  2. Select Exit.
  3. Select Enter.

Cleaning Up Your Desktop 152/1+

The Minimized Window Viewer is where open objects are stored when they are minimized. This keeps your desktop organized but still allows you to have multiple objects open and running. To open the Minimized Window Viewer:

  1. Point to Minimized Window Viewer.
  2. Double-click.

Displaying an Object in the Minimized Window Viewer 153/2

The objects in the Minimized Window Viewer are still open, but they are running in the background (cannot accept user input). To display an object found in the Minimized Window Viewer:

  1. Open the Minimized Window Viewer.
  2. Point to the object.
  3. Double-click.
or:
  1. Point to an empty area on the desktop.
  2. Click mouse buttons 1 and 2 at the same time.
  3. Point to the title of the object you want to display.
  4. Double-click.
Note:  There may be more titles in the Window List than objects in the
Minimized Window Viewer, because hidden windows are also displayed in the
Window List.

Minimizing an Object to the Desktop 154/2

Some frequently used objects might be easier to re-access if they are minimized to the desktop instead of the Minimized Window Viewer. To make an object minimize to the desktop:

  1. Point to the object you want to minimize to the desktop.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Settings.
  4. Select the Window tab.
  5. Select Minimize button.  (If the choice is present.)
  6. Select Minimize window to desktop.
  7. Point to the title-bar icon.
  8. Double-click.

Minimizing an Object to the Minimized Window Viewer 155/2

Most objects by default are set up to minimize to the Minimized Window Viewer. However, some objects are not. To make an object minimize to the Minimized Window Viewer:

  1. Point to the object you want to minimize to the Minimized Window Viewer.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Settings.
  4. Select the Window tab.
  5. Select Minimize button.  (If the choice is present.)
  6. Select Minimize window to viewer.
  7. Point to the title-bar icon.
  8. Double-click.

Using the Shredder 156/1+

The Shredder object provides a quick and easy way to delete objects. It is located on the LaunchPad . To delete an object:

  1. Point to the object.
  2. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  3. Drag the object to the Shredder.
  4. Release mouse button 2.
  5. Respond to confirmation messages (if applicable).

Customizing the Delete Confirmations 157/2

You can change the settings of your desktop to specify when confirmation messages appear, if any, when you delete an object. The following confirmation choices are available:

Confirm on folder delete  Displays a confirmation message whenever a folder
                          object is deleted using the Shredder object or a
                          pop-up menu.
Confirm on delete         Displays a confirmation message whenever an object is
                          deleted using the Shredder object or a pop-up menu.
    Important Disabling the confirmation messages increases your chances of
    accidentally deleting an object.
To change the settings:
  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the Confirmations tab.
  5. Make sure a check mark appears in each choice that you want to enable.  To
     add or remove a check mark, select the choice.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.

Preparing Your System to Recover Deleted Objects 158/2

Chances are that at some point you will accidentally delete an object that you need. You can recover a deleted object if the DELDIR environment variable is enabled in your CONFIG.SYS file prior to deleting the object. To enable DELDIR:

  1. Edit your C:\CONFIG.SYS file and remove the REM statement from the
     beginning of the DELDIR statement.
       a. Open OS/2 System.
       b. Open Drives.
       c. Open Drive C.  (If the OS/2 operating system is installed on a
          different drive, open that drive instead.)
       d. After the Drive C object opens, a tree view of its contents is
          displayed.  Open the Drive C entry in the tree.
       e. Open the C:\CONFIG.SYS file.
       f. Select Edit.
       g. Select Find.
       h. Type DELDIR (all caps) in the Find field.
       i. Select Find.  (If the DELDIR statement is not found, see the online
          Command Reference for instructions on how to add it.)
       j. Select the beginning of the DELDIR line.
       k. Delete REM from the beginning of the line using the Del key.
       l. Point to the title-bar icon.
       m. Double-click.
       n. Select Save.
       o. Select Type.
       p. Select Set.
  2. Shut down your system; then restart it.  Changes made to the CONFIG.SYS
     object are not initiated until the system is restarted.
The DELDIR statement specifies the size of the directory used to hold deleted
objects.  When the directory is full, the oldest files in the directory are
removed in order to make room for the new objects.
If you delete an object, recover it as soon as possible afterwards, or it might
be too late.  For more information about DELDIR, see the online Command
Reference.
Note:  To be able to recover objects deleted in a DOS session, repeat the
preceding procedure on the AUTOEXEC.BAT file.

Recovering Deleted Objects 159/2

You can recover a deleted or erased object using the UNDELETE command. Note: The DELDIR environment variable must be enabled prior to the deletion of the object. For more information about DELDIR, see Preparing Your System to Recover Deleted Objects.

To recover a deleted object:
  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open a DOS or OS/2 window.
  4. Type UNDELETE /L and press Enter to see a list of file names associated
     with the recently deleted objects.
  5. Write down the complete path and file name.  Include the drive letter,
     directory names, and the file name.  For example:
     C:\OS2\SAMPLE.TXT
  6. Type UNDELETE followed by the complete path and file name.  For example:
     UNDELETE C:\OS2\SAMPLE.TXT
  7. Press Enter.
The file associated with the deleted object has now been successfully
recovered.  For more information about UNDELETE, see the online Command
Reference.
To place the object back on the desktop:
  1. Open Drives.
  2. Open the drive that contains the recovered file (object).
  3. Find the object on the drive.
  4. Point to the object.
  5. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  6. Drag the object to the desktop.
  7. Release mouse button 2.

Using Templates 160/1+

A template is an object that you can use as a model to create additional objects. When you drag a template, you create another of the original object, as though you were peeling one of the objects off a stack. The new object has the same settings and contents as the templates in the stack.

Creating an Object from the Templates Folder 161/2+

You can create new objects by using the objects in the Templates folder. To open the Templates folder:

  1. Point to the Templates object on the Desktop.
  2. Double-click.

Creating a Folder Object 162/3

To use the Folder template to create a new folder:

  1. Open Templates.
  2. Point to the Folder template.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag a copy of the Folder template to the Desktop or to another folder.
  5. Release mouse button 2.  An empty folder is created.
  6. Rename the folder (for example, "My new folder").  For information about
     renaming, see the OS/2 Tutorial.
You can drag any objects you want (for example, program objects and data-file
objects) to the new folder.
    Tip The operating system will add new templates when you install programs
    that support them.  The MMPM/2 application supports templates for digital
    audio, MIDI, and digital video files.

Creating a Data-File Object 163/3

To use the Data File template to create a data-file object:

  1. Open Templates.
  2. Move the mouse pointer to the Data-File template.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the Data-File template to any folder (including the Desktop folder).
     A new data-file object is created.
  5. Open the data-file object to begin editing the file with the System
     Editor.
  6. When you are ready to save the file, select File; then select Save.
     Respond to the system prompts (for example, in the Save notification
     window, indicate if you want a file type such as plain text).
  7. Double-click mouse button 1 on the title-bar icon to close the window.
  8. Rename the object currently titled "Data File".  Refer to the OS/2
     Tutorial.
Note:  If you use Save as on the File menu instead of Save, another object is
created with the new name. "Data File" remains an empty file.
If you open a data-file object that is not associated with any other program,
it automatically opens in the OS/2 System Editor.  If you prefer, you can
associate the data-file object with one or more program objects (for more
information, see the Master Help Index).  For more information about using the
OS/2 System Editor, select Help on the menu.

Creating a Program Object 164/3

A program object starts a program or a session. If you install a new OS/2, DOS, or Windows program, you might need to run the Add Programs program in the System Setup folder to create a program object. This is the recommended method of creating a program object. You also can create a program object using the Templates folder.

  1. Open Templates.
  2. Move the mouse pointer to the Program template.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the Program template to a folder or to the Desktop.
  5. Customize the program object using the Settings notebook.  For example,
     select the session type, name the program object, or set up the
     associations.

Creating a Template of an Object 165/2

You can create a template of an object when you have an existing object (such as a form letter with a company letterhead) and you need another one. For example, you could make the form letter a template and then customize it for different customers. The new object will have the same settings (such as associations) and contents as the original. To create a template of an object:

  1. Display the pop-up menu for the object by pointing at the object and then
     clicking mouse button 2.
  2. Select Settings.
  3. Select the General tab.
  4. Select the Template check box.
  5. Close the Settings notebook.
The object is now displayed as a template.
Drag a copy of the object from the template whenever you need a new copy.
Customize the new object to your preference.  For example, you can change the
name of the object and add a new icon (see the OS/2 Tutorial or the Master Help
Index).
If you want to move a stack of templates, rather than create an object from the
top template, press the Shift key while dragging the stack.

Creating Another Object 166/2

All objects that have a Create another choice in their pop-up menu have a cascaded menu that lists their templates. When you create a template of your own, it is added to the cascaded menu. The result of Create another is identical to creating an object from a template.

If you select Create another from the pop-up menu of an object, a new object

with the same default settings and data is created. If you select the arrow to the right of Create another, a cascaded menu is displayed. This menu contains a listing of all the template objects you created. You can select one of the choices to create another object from that template. For example, suppose you created a template and named it "Company letterhead." This template is listed as a choice on the cascaded menu. Whenever you need to create a similar letter, select Company letterhead. The new data-file object contains whatever was in the original "Company letterhead" and the same settings (such as associations). To create another object using a pop-up menu:

  1. Display the pop-up menu for the object by pointing at the object and then
     clicking mouse button 2.
  2. Select Create another if you want to use one of your templates, or select
     the arrow to the right of Create another and select a template choice.
Note:  The new object appears in the active folder; for example, if the object
is on the Desktop, the duplicate appears on the Desktop.

Setting Up Printers 167/1+

If you installed a printer when you installed OS/2, a printer object is on your Desktop. The printer object is used to print jobs (data files) and check their progress. If you want to add a printer object, see Installing a Printer. Note: The explanations and instructions in this chapter apply to printers and plotters. Each printer object represents a certain arrangement of hardware, software, and configurations, which simplifies the printing process. Printer objects can represent local printers and network printers. Local printers are connected to individual computers or individual workstations on a network. Network printers are connected to local area network (LAN) servers and can be used by workstations connected to the network. For more detailed information about printer and printing, see the OS/2 Tutorial and the online Printing in OS/2 book located in the Information folder.

Installing a Printer 168/2+

Even if you did not select a printer during the OS/2 installation, you still can add a printer to the system. There are several different procedures to choose from. From the following list, choose the procedure that best describes your situation, then follow the instructions to add the printer.

  o  Create a printer object but use a printer driver that is currently
     installed on the system.  See Creating a Printer Object.
  o  Create a printer object and install a new printer driver to use with it.
     See Creating a Printer Object and Installing a Printer Driver.
  o  Install a new printer driver but use an existing printer object. See
     Installing a Printer Driver Only.
  o  Change the printer driver being used with an existing printer object.  See
     Changing Printer Drivers.
  o  Install a Windows printer driver for use with WIN-OS/2. See Installing a
     Printer Driver for a WIN-OS/2 Session.
  o  Install an OEM (Other Equipment Manufacturer) printer driver for use with
     Windows. See Installing a Printer Driver from Another Manufacturer for a
     WIN-OS/2 Session.
Note:  When you create an OS/2 printer object, you might be prompted to create
an equivalent Windows printer object.  If you choose to create the Windows
printer object, you also are prompted to install a Windows printer driver.

Creating a Printer Object 169/3

This procedure involves adding a printer object and selecting a printer driver. Use this procedure if you have existing printer drivers installed on your system and you want this new printer object to use one of them. To create a printer object to use with an existing printer driver:

  1. Open Templates.
  2. Point to the Printer template.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the template to a folder or the Desktop.
  5. Release mouse button 2.  The Create a Printer window is displayed.
  6. Type a name for the printer in the Name field.
  7. Select the port to which the printer is connected.
  8. Select the printer driver that corresponds to your printer model.
  9. Select Create.
 10. Respond to the "Do you want to install an equivalent WIN-OS/2 printer
     configuration" question; then follow the instructions on the screen to
     complete the installation.
A new printer object is on your Desktop.  If you want to customize the settings
for this new printer object, see Setting Printer Properties.

Creating a Printer Object and Installing a Printer Driver 170/3

This procedure involves creating a printer object and installing a printer driver. Use this procedure if you want to create a printer object and install a new printer driver.

  1. Open Templates.
  2. Point to the Printer template.
  3. Press and hold mouse button 2.
  4. Drag the template to a folder or the Desktop.
  5. Release mouse button 2.
  6. Type a name for the printer in the Name field.
  7. Select the port to which the printer is connected.
  8. Select Install new printer driver.
  9. Use the instructions in the following list to install your printer driver:
       o  If your printer driver came with the OS/2 operating system, follow
          the instructions for Printer Driver Shipped with OS/2.
       o  If your printer driver did not come with the OS/2 operating system,
          follow the instructions for Other Printer Driver.
Printer Driver Shipped with OS/2
  1. Select one or more printer drivers in the list.
  2. Select Install.
  3. Ensure that the information in the Directory field is correct.
  4. Select OK.
  5. Select create to create the printer object.
Other Printer Driver
  1. Select Other OS/2 printer driver
  2. Insert the diskette containing the printer drivers in drive A or type the
     appropriate drive designation and path in the Directory field.
  3. Select Refresh.  Wait until the window fills with printer drivers.
  4. Select one or more drivers.  If the driver you need is not listed, insert
     another diskette or change the information in the Directory field and
     select Refresh again.
  5. Select Install.
  6. Select Create to create the printer object.
A new printer object is on your Desktop.  If you want to customize the settings
for this new printer object, see Setting Printer Properties.
    Tip Many printers have multiple printer drivers available.  For example,
    Hewlett Packard has several drivers for their LaserJet IIID printer. To
    ensure that you get the correct driver with the printer model you select,
    scroll the Printer Driver field to the right until you can see the name of
    the printer driver.

Installing a Printer Driver Only 171/3

Sometimes you have an existing printer object, but you do not have the correct printer driver on your system. This might happen if you add a different printer to your system. To install a new driver for an existing printer object:

  1. Point to the printer object.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Settings.
  4. Select the Printer driver tab.
  5. Point to one of the printer driver objects.
  6. Click mouse button 2.
  7. Select Install.
  8. Use the instructions in the following list to install your printer driver:
       o  If your printer driver came with the OS/2 operating system, follow
          the instructions for Printer Driver Shipped with OS/2.
       o  If your printer driver did not come with the OS/2 operating system,
          follow the instructions for Other Printer Driver.
Printer Driver Shipped with OS/2
  1. Select one or more printer drivers in the list.
  2. Select Install.
  3. Ensure that the information in the Directory field is correct.
  4. Select OK.
Other Printer Driver
  1. Select Other OS/2 printer driver.
  2. Insert the diskette containing the printer drivers in drive A or type the
     appropriate drive designation and path in the Directory field.
  3. Select Refresh.
  4. Select one or more drivers.  If the driver you need is not listed, insert
     another diskette or change the information in the Directory field and
     select Refresh again.
  5. Select Install.
A new printer driver is installed.  If you want to customize the settings for
this new printer driver, see Setting Printer Properties.
    Tip Many printers have multiple printer drivers available.  For example,
    Hewlett Packard has several drivers for their LaserJet IIID printer. To
    ensure that you get the correct driver with the printer model you select,
    scroll the Printer Driver field to the right until you can see the printer
    driver name.

Changing Printer Drivers 172/3

You might already have both the printer object and the printer driver installed on your system, but you need to connect them. This might happen if you like to use different printer drivers with a printer object. To change to a different printer driver:

  1. Point to the printer object.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Settings.
  4. Select the Printer driver tab.
  5. Select the printer driver.
  6. Point to the title-bar icon.
  7. Double-click.
The printer object is now set up to use a different printer driver. See Setting
Printer Properties for information about setting the properties to match the
capabilities of the new printer driver.

Installing a Printer Driver for a WIN-OS/2 Session 173/3

Windows programs print directly to the OS/2 spooler. Therefore, multiple print jobs can be spooled from one WIN-OS/2 session or multiple WIN-OS/2 sessions. To install a printer driver in Windows:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open WIN-OS/2 Full Screen.
  4. Open WIN-OS/2 Main.
  5. Open Control Panel.
  6. Open Printers.
  7. Select Add and then select a printer driver in the list.
  8. Select Install.
  9. Insert the diskette containing the printer drivers in drive A or type the
     appropriate drive designation and path in the Install Driver pop-up
     window.
 10. Select OK.
 11. Select Connect.
 12. Select LPT1.OS2, LPT2.OS2, or LPT3.OS2.
     Note:  You can select a COMx port, but no spooling to the OS/2 Print
     object will occur.  However, you will still be able to use the Print
     Manager in Windows.
 13. Select OK.
 14. Select the printer that you want to assign as the default.
 15. Select the Set as Default Printer pushbutton.
 16. Select Close.

Installing a Printer Driver from Another Manufacturer for a WIN-OS/2 Session 174/3

OS/2 has a wide variety of printer drivers available for use with Windows. However, there might be times when you want to use a driver supplied by another printer manufacturer. To add a Windows printer driver supplied by another printer manufacturer:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open WIN-OS/2 Full Screen
  4. Open WIN-OS/2 Main
  5. Open Control Panel.
  6. Open Printers.
  7. Select Add.
  8. Select Unlisted Printer from the beginning of the list of printers.
  9. Select Install.
 10. Insert the diskette containing the printer drivers in drive A or type the
     appropriate drive designation and path in the Install Driver pop-up
     window.
 11. Select OK.
 12. Select Connect.
 13. Select LPT1.OS2, LPT2.OS2, or LPT3.OS2.
 14. Select OK.
 15. Select the printer that you want to assign as the default.
 16. Select the Set as Default Printer pushbutton.
 17. Select Close.
    Tip If you also want to create an OS/2 printer object for use with the same
    driver, follow the instructions for Creating a Printer Object and make the
    following selections:
      o  Select the same port you selected for your printer, using the Windows
         Control Panel.
      o  Select the OS/2 printer driver, IBMNULL, as the default driver.
         (IBMNULL is installed during system installation.)

Setting Printer Properties 175/2

A printer driver has settings called printer properties. Printer properties describe the way your printer is physically set up. Examples of printer properties are:

  o  Type of paper feed (tractor or bin)
  o  Number and location of paper trays
  o  Forms defined for your printer
  o  Forms loaded in the paper feed or trays of your printer
  o  Font cartridges loaded on the printer
  o  Installed soft fonts
  o  Additional features installed, such as extended symbol sets and patterns
  o  Resolution
  o  Orientation
  o  Compression
Examples of plotter properties are:
  o  Number of carousels
  o  Active carousel
  o  Color type of each pen in a carousel
The number and kind of properties available depend upon the type of printer or
plotter you have.
To set the printer properties:
  1. Point to the printer object.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Settings.
  4. Select the Printer driver tab.
  5. Point to a printer driver.
  6. Click mouse button 2.
  7. Select Settings.
  8. Change the properties to match your printer setup.
  9. Point to the title-bar icon.
 10. Double-click.
Your printer object is now set up to print a job.  For information about how to
print a job, see the online Printing in OS/2 book located in the Information
Folder.

Using Productivity Tools and Games 176/1+

The Productivity folder provides programs that assist you in editing text and icons, searching for files or text and displaying system utilization., Each productivity program has a set of help menus to assist you with using the program. The Games folder provides you with games for your entertainment.

The Productivity Folder 177/2+

To open a Productivity program:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Productivity.
  3. Open the program you want to use.

For information about using a program in the Productivity folder, press F1 after the program is opened.

Clipboard Viewer 178/3

Clipboard Viewer is a program that enables you to view the contents of the OS/2 clipboard. The system clipboard is used to share information between programs in the same session or in different sessions (for information about sessions, see Using Command Prompts). It temporarily holds data being passed from one program to another. You can copy or cut information to the clipboard from a program in one session and then paste the information from the clipboard to a program in a different session. For more information about the clipboard, refer to the online book Windows Programs in OS/2

Enhanced Editor 179/3

Enhanced Editor is an editor you can use to create and edit text files. It also enables you to work on multiple files at the same time. You can start the Enhanced Editor by opening its object or by typing EPM at the OS/2 command prompt and pressing Enter. The Enhanced Editor has a number of features and functions. These features and functions are thoroughly explained in the Quick Reference help file located under the Help menu bar choice of the Enhanced Editor.

Icon Editor    180/3

Icon Editor is a tool that enables you to create, edit, and convert image files.

These files include icons, bit maps, and pointers.  An icon is a graphical

representation of an object or a minimized program. A bit map is a special type of image made up of a series of dots. (The OS/2 logo is an example of a bit map.) A pointer is a small symbol on the screen that reflects the movement of the mouse.

OS/2 System Editor    181/3

The OS/2 System Editor is used to create and edit text files. You can use the System Editor to edit your CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT system files. The System Editor runs in a window. You can start several sessions of the System Editor so that you can edit several files at once. You can start the System Editor two ways:

  o  By selecting its object
  o  Opening a data file associated with the System Editor.  (All data files
     area associated with the System Editor by default.)
  o  By typing E (and pressing Enter) at an OS/2 command line If you want to
     edit a particular file, you follow the E with a space and then type the
     path and file name of the file.
Picture Viewer    182/3

Picture Viewer displays and prints metafile (.MET) and picture interchange format (.PIF) files. You also can view spooler (.SPL) files; however, the file must contain a picture in a standard OS/2 format. Note: Picture Viewer does not support multiple-page metafiles.

Picture Viewer lets you zoom in or zoom out of a picture after it is displayed.
 Move the mouse pointer to the portion of the picture you want to zoom in and
then double-click mouse button 1.
Pulse    183/3

Pulse is a system monitor. Use Pulse to see a graphic representation of how different activities affect the system and how much processor power is still available for other programs. You can change the colors of the graphic, adjust the graph line, and freeze the screen image.

Seek and Scan Files    184/3

Seek and Scan Files is a program that quickly searches one or more disks for files or text. When a file match is found, it is displayed in a selection list.

Then you can open (or run) the selected file.
The Games Folder    185/2+

The Games folder contains Klondike Solitaire, OS/2 Chess and Mahjongg. To start a game:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Games.
  3. Open the game you want to play.
For information about playing a game in the Games folder, press F1 after the
game is opened.
Klondike Solitaire    186/3

Klondike Solitaire is a popular card game for one person. The object of this game is to find the aces and build on them in suit and in ascending order. You use the mouse to move the cards to their new location.

OS/2 Chess    187/3

With OS/2 Chess, you can play a game of chess against another person playing on the same computer or on a network workstation. You also can play against the computer. The object of the game is to checkmate your opponent's king.

Mahjongg    188/3

Mahjongg is a popular version of the ancient Chinese tile game. The object of this game is to remove all the tiles by matching all the pairs.

Using the Information    189/1+

The Information folder contains information to aid you in using OS/2. To open the Information folder:

  1. Point to Information
  2. Double-click.
The Information folder contains all the online documents described in this
chapter.
Using OS/2    190/2

The OS/2 Tutorial is an interactive and animated look at the OS/2 Workplace Shell interface. It explains how to use a mouse, work with objects and folders, use windows, and get help. If you are new to OS/2, you should spend the 40 minutes (approximate) it takes to go through the tutorial. You will find that it is time well spent. To start the OS/2 Tutorial:

  1. Open Information
  2. Open Tutorial
Command Reference    191/2+

Before there were friendly operating system interfaces like the Workplace Shell, computer users communicated with a computer using a predefined set of instructions called commands. Users would type a command at a prompt, and the computer would perform the requested task. Some people still like to communicate with the computer in this way. For that reason, OS/2 supplies both DOS and OS/2 command prompts and the OS/2 Command Reference. The Command Reference explains each OS/2 and DOS command, graphically shows the correct syntax of the command, and gives examples of when and how to use the command. In addition, it explains the commands that can be used to create a batch file (a series of commands that are processed sequentially). Batch files are useful for automating the entering of commands that are used over and over again. To open the OS/2 Command Reference:

  1. Open Information.
  2. Open Command Reference.
To open the OS/2 Command Reference and get information about a specific
command:
  1. At an OS/2 command prompt, type HELP followed by the name of the command.
     For example:
     HELP COPY
  2. Press Enter.  The Command Reference is opened to the COPY command page.
Using the Contents Window    192/3

The Contents window is the first window that appears when the Command Reference is opened. Notice that some of the topics in this window have a plus (+) sign beside them. The plus sign indicates that additional topics are available. To expand the Contents and view the additional topics:

  1. Select the + sign.
To collapse the topics in the Contents:
  1. Select the - sign.
To open a topic:
  1. Point to the title of the topic.
  2. Double-click.
Obtaining Additional Information    193/3

When a topic is opened, the information for the topic is displayed in a window. Highlighted words and phrases in the window indicate that additional information is hidden "beneath" the word or phrase. To view the additional information:

  1. Point to the highlighted word or phrase.
  2. Double-click.
To return to the previous window of information:
  1. Select Previous.
Searching for Information    194/3

There might be times when you are using the Command Reference when you have an idea of what you want, but you cannot remember where it is. The search function can help you find the information you need. To search for a word or phrase in all the topics in the Command Reference:

  1. Select Search.
  2. Type the word or words you want to find.  You can also use the ? and *
     wildcard characters in the search field.
  3. Make sure that All sections is selected; then select Search.
A Search Results window appears containing a list of topics that have the word
or phrase that you were trying to find.  To open a topic, point to a topic and
double-click.
Sometimes, you have a general idea where the information is.  You can limit the
search to those topics by marking the topics.
To mark a topic:
  1. Press and hold Ctrl.
  2. Select the topics that you want to search.
  3. Release Ctrl.
To unmark a topic:
  1. Press and hold Ctrl.
  2. Select the topic.
  3. Release Ctrl.
To search for a word or phrase in marked topics:
  1. Select the + signs in the Contents window.
  2. Mark the topics you want to search.
  3. Select Search.
  4. Type the word or words you want to find.
  5. Make sure that Marked sections is selected; then select Search.
When the Search Results window appears, open the topics and read them.
Using a Bookmark    195/3

Information that you refer to frequently can be flagged using a bookmark. Setting a bookmark duplicates the topic in a bookmark window. To set a bookmark:

  1. Open the topic that you want to mark with a bookmark.
  2. Select Services.
  3. Select Bookmark.
  4. Change the name used for the bookmark (optional).
  5. Make sure Place is selected; then select OK.
To view bookmarked information:
  1. Select Services.
  2. Select Bookmark.
  3. Select View.
  4. Select the topic you want to open.
  5. Select OK.
To remove a bookmark:
  1. Select Services.
  2. Select Bookmark.
  3. Select Remove.
  4. Select the topic you want to remove.
  5. Select OK.
Printing a Topic    196/3

Some people prefer to read information in a hardcopy format. You can print a topic, some topics, all topics, the table of contents, and the index of the Command Reference. To print a topic:

  1. Open the topic you want to print.
  2. Select Print.
  3. Make sure that This section is selected; then select Print.
To print more than one topic:
  1. Press and hold Ctrl.
  2. Select the topics that you want to print.
  3. Release Ctrl.
  4. Select Print.
  5. Make sure that Marked sections is selected; then select Print.
To print the table of contents, index, or all the topics:
  1. Select Print.
  2. Select the item you want to print.
  3. Select Print.
Note:  The Contents and Index choices only print the entries; they do not print
the text associated with the entries.  The All sections choice prints the
entire Command Reference.  Before electing to do this, be aware that the
document is large and will take a long time to print.

Glossary 197/2

The Glossary is an alphabetic listing of terms used in the Workplace Shell interface and the online help system. To open the Glossary:

  1. Open Information.
  2. Open Glossary.

There are three ways to find a term in the glossary. You can type the first letter of the word you are looking for, scroll through the list or use the search function.

To scroll through the list to find a term in the glossary:

  1. Select the letter that the word begins with. If the letter is not visible, select the tab arrow until the letter is visible; then select the letter.
  2. Select the up or down arrow in the scroll bar until the term is visible.
  3. Point to the term.
  4. Double-click.

To use the search function to find a term in the glossary:

  1. Select Search topics.
  2. Type the term that you want to find.
  3. Select Search.
  4. When the list of matching entries appears, point to the term; then double-click.

REXX Information 198/2+

REXX is a procedures language designed to make basic OS/2 programs easier to write and debug. Both beginning and experienced programmers will find REXX easy to use because it uses common English words, arithmetic and string functions, and OS/2 commands within a simple framework. To view the REXX Information:

  1. Open Information.
  2. Open REXX Information.

For information about using the Contents window, searching, printing and getting additional information, see Command Reference.

Displaying Help for OS/2 Messages 199/3

You can get information to help you understand, correct, and respond to OS/2 messages. The way you request help depends upon how and where the message is displayed. To get help for a message that appears in a window with a Help push button:

  1. Select the Help push button.

To get help for a message that appears on a full screen and is enclosed in a box:

  1. Use the up or down arrow key to highlight Display Help.
  2. Press Enter.

To get help for an error message that has a message number, preceded by the letters SYS:

  1. At the OS/2 command prompt, type HELP followed by a space and the message number. (It is not necessary to type the letters SYS or the leading zeros.)
  2. Press Enter.

For example, if you received this message:

SYS0002:  The system cannot find the file specified.

To request help for this message, type HELP 2 and then press Enter. The following help appears:

SYS0002:  The system cannot find the file specified.
EXPLANATION:  The file named in the command does not exist in the current directory or search path specified.  Or, the file name was entered incorrectly.
ACTION:  Retry the command using the correct file name.

Mastering the Master Help Index 200/1+

The Master Help Index is an online, alphabetic list of topics available to help you while using OS/2. This index contains information about:

  • Things to consider before performing a task
  • Steps to take to complete a task
  • OS/2 concepts
  • DOS error messages

To open the Master Help Index:

  1. Open Information.
  2. Open Master Help Index

Tabs turn to the page in the index of the selected alphabet letter. Tab arrows scroll the tabs but do not scroll the index entries. Scroll bar arrows (vertical scroll bar) scroll the index entries one line at a time. Scroll bar arrows (horizontal scroll bar) scroll the index entries to the left or right so you can read information that does not fit into the window. Index entries are the online help for the OS/2 operating system.

To open an index entry for viewing:

  1. Point to the entry.
  2. Double-click.

Accessing Additional Information 201/2

When an index entry is opened, the information for the topic is displayed in a window. Some entries have highlighted words and phrases in the window, which indicate that additional information is hidden "beneath" the word or phrase.

To view the additional information:

  1. Point to the highlighted word or phrase.
  2. Double-click.

To return to the previous window of information:

  1. Select Previous.

Searching for a Topic 202/2

You can search the Master Help Index for an entry using one or more words that describe the topic. For example, to search for information about how to duplicate an object, you might search using the word "duplicate", "duplicates", or even "duplicating". The result of a search (using duplicate, duplicates, or duplicating) is "copying an object".

To search for a topic:

  1. Open the Master Help Index.
  2. Select Search topics.
  3. In the Search string field, type the word or words that describe the topic.
  4. Select Search.
  5. When the list of topics (matched items) appears, open the entry you want to read.

Printing a Master Help Index Entry 203/2

To print a Master Help Index entry:

  1. Open the index entry you want to print.
  2. Select Print topic.

For more information about using the Master Help Index, review the OS/2 Tutorial.

Part 4 - Troubleshooting 204/1

Solving Installation Problems 205/1+

This chapter provides information to help you solve problems you might encounter while installing OS/2*. It includes information about what to do if you have problems, plus specific instructions for recovering from error messages or problems with installation diskettes, screens, or CD-ROMs. Use the table of contents at the beginning of this chapter to locate the information dealing with a particular problem.

What to Do If You Have Problems 206/2

Installation of OS/2 is generally a straightforward process and, in most cases, you will not experience problems. However, if you do encounter a problem during installation, do the following:

  1. Read through this chapter to see if the problem you are experiencing is documented.
  2. If you received an error message (or error number), locate the message in this chapter and perform the suggested actions to resolve the problem.
  3. If your problem is not addressed in this section, refer to the Service and Support brochure in your OS/2 package for instructions on how to get additional assistance.

When you report your problem make sure you include the following information:

  • The brand and model of the equipment you are using
  • The error message or number, if any, that appeared on your screen
  • The number of the installation diskette you were using when the problem occurred
  • The number for your fax machine, or the number of a fax machine to which you have access

Editing the CONFIG.SYS File on Diskette 1 207/2

A CONFIG.SYS file contains lines of instructions that control how your computer starts up and how it works with the devices you have attached to it. Diskette 1, which comes with OS/2, contains a CONFIG.SYS file. The file is added to your root directory during installation. There might be instances in which you will be instructed in this chapter to edit your CONFIG.SYS file in order to add a statement, "remark out" a line, or modify an existing line in the file. If you need to alter the CONFIG.SYS file before you install OS/2, you will need to make the changes to the CONFIG.SYS file on Diskette 1. Note: If the CONFIG.SYS file is changed incorrectly, you might not be able to restart your computer. Be careful when editing the file.

To edit the CONFIG.SYS file that is on Diskette 1, use an ASCII text editor. If you do not have a text editor installed on your computer, use the editor that comes on the OS/2 installation diskettes. Follow these steps:

  1. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.
  2. Turn on your computer.  If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  3. When you are prompted to do so, remove the Installation Diskette and
     insert Diskette 1.
  4. When the Welcome to OS/2! screen appears, press F3 to display the command
     prompt.
  5. At the command prompt, type TEDIT CONFIG.SYS and press Enter. The file
     will appear on your screen, and you can make any changes or additions to
     it.  (Press F1 if you need help using the editor.)
  6. When you are done working on the file, press F2 to save it.
  7. Press F4 to quit the editor.

Installation Error Messages 208/2

If you receive one of the following error messages on your screen while installing OS/2, try to resolve the problem with the suggested action. Only some files were copied. You may be out of disk space.

Explanation:  The installation program stopped transferring files because there
              was not enough hard disk space available.
Action:       Move non-OS/2 operating system files out of the installation
              partition.  You can store these files in another partition or on
              a diskette.  If you intend to format the installation partition,
              remember to first use the BACKUP command to save any important
              files.
An error occurred when System Installation tried to copy a file.
Explanation 1: The installation diskette might contain errors.
Action:       Request a replacement diskette from your place of purchase.
Explanation 2: The installation program stopped transferring files because
              there was not enough hard disk space available.
Action:       Move non-OS/2 operating system files out of the installation
              partition.  You can store these files in another partition or on
              a diskette.  If you intend to format the installation partition,
              remember to first use the BACKUP command to save any important
              files.
Explanation 3: The hard disk might contain errors.
Action:       Follow the CHKDSK procedure outlined in Recovering from Errors on
              the Hard Disk.
An error occurred when System Installation tried to transfer system files to
your hard disk.  Your hard disk might be unusable.
Explanation:  The installation program stopped transferring files because an
              error occurred while the boot record was being written.
Action:       Format the installation partition and restart the installation.
              Remember to first use the BACKUP command to save any important
              files.
System Installation failed trying to load a module into memory.
Explanation:  The installation program could not load a system module because
              there is not enough memory.  OS/2 requires a minimum of 4MB of
              memory.
Action:       Add more system memory (RAM).
An error occurred when System Installation tried to allocate a segment of
memory.
Explanation:  The installation program could not allocate a segment of memory
              because there is not enough memory.  OS/2 requires a minimum of
              4MB of memory.
Action:       Add more system memory (RAM).
FDISK unsuccessful.
Explanation:  Your hard disk controller might not be supported.
Action:       Make a copy of Diskette 1.  Locate the Device Support Diskette
              supplied by the manufacturer of your hard disk controller. Copy
              the OS/2 device driver from that Device Support Diskette onto the
              copy of Diskette 1.  Then add the statement BASEDEV=xxx.SYS
              (where xxx is the name of the device driver) to the CONFIG.SYS
              file on the copy of Diskette 1, and restart the installation.
An error occurred when System Installation tried to locate the dynamic link
library.
Explanation:  The installation program could not load the dynamic link library
              because there is not enough random access memory (RAM). OS/2
              requires a minimum of 4MB of memory
Action:       Add more system memory (RAM).
A disk read error occurred.
Explanation:  The BIOS level of the Future Domain** adapter is not compatible.
Action:       Contact Future Domain for a BIOS upgrade if you own the
              following:
  o  Future Domain TMC-850/860/875/885 with BIOS revision level 7.0
  o  Future Domain TMC-1660/1670/1680 with BIOS revision level 2.0
OS/2 is unable to operate your hard disk or your diskette drive.
Explanation 1: This might indicate some incompatibility between OS/2 and the
              diskette drive controller or hard disk controller in your system.
Action:       Edit the CONFIG.SYS file on the diskette or hard disk from which
              you are starting OS/2.  Remove all lines with
              BASEDEV=xxxxxxxx.ADD (where xxxxxxxx can be any characters), and
              make sure the following two lines appear in the CONFIG.SYS:
              BASEDEV=IBMxFLPY.ADD
              BASEDEV=IBMINT13.I13
              (where x is replaced by a 2 if you are using a Micro Channel
              system, and a 1 if you are using any other system.)
Explanation 2: A diskette drive or a hard disk drive controller might have an
              additional device (such as a tape backup) attached to it.
Action:       Disconnect additional devices, if possible.
Explanation 3: There might be an interrupt request (IRQ) level conflict between
              the diskette drive or hard disk controller and other devices
              installed on your system.
Action:       Change IRQ levels to eliminate conflicts.
Explanation 4: The hard disk partition on which you are installing OS/2 was
              compressed with a DOS data compression program.
Action:       Use the data compression program to decompress the partition.
              Then restart the installation procedure.
TRAPxxx
Explanation:  In general, traps are symptoms of software-related problems.
              After you have pursued these symptoms from a software failure
              perspective, you should consider the potential of a hardware
              cause relating to caches and memory, such as the following:
  o  If your computer has an 80486 microprocessor, your computer might require
     faster RAM chips (60ns or 70ns).
  o  There might be a problem with the external (level-2) CPU memory cache or
     main memory system on ISA or EISA systems.
Action:       Try the following:
  1. From the setup/diagnostics diskette or the BIOS Setup program built into
     the computer, try disabling all shadow RAM and external (level- 2) CPU
     memory caches.
  2. If problems persist during the installation of OS/2 after performing the
     above action, turn off the turbo switch (if one is available) on your
     system and retry the operation.  Disable caching during installation or
     turn the turbo switch off.
Some of the more common traps are listed below.  If you receive a trap error
that is not listed, you can view help for the trap after OS/2 is installed, by
typing HELP followed by the trap number at an OS/2 command prompt.  For
example:
HELP 0002
If the trap error contains a letter, as in a TRAP D error you must convert the
hexadecimal number (D) to decimal then add it to 1930.  For example, TRAP D
converted would be 1943 because D hexadecimal is 13 decimal (13 added to 1930
equals 1943).  So you would type HELP 1943 at an OS/2 command prompt.
A list of the hexadecimal to decimal conversions are listed below:
A = 10       D = 13
B = 11       E = 14
C = 12       F = 15
TRAP0002
Explanation:  A TRAP0002 error is a hardware error and is usually related
              directly to memory.  Mismatched memory modules can often cause
              these kinds of errors.  Your computer might have a variety of
              single inline memory modules (SIMMs) that were produced by
              different manufacturers or that operate at different speeds.
              (For example, a 1 x 9 module cannot be used with a 1 x 3 module.)
Action:       Try the following:
  o  Have your computer checked by a service representative.
  o  If your computer memory is okay and the problem persists, make sure that
     your system BIOS is of a recent date (1991 or later). Refer to Chapter 17,
     "Special Hardware Considerations," for more information about BIOS, or
     contact the manufacturer of your computer BIOS to receive the latest
     version.
SYS0005
Explanation:  When you perform a redirected remote installation of OS/2 using
              SYSINST2 for panel installation, the error message SYS0005
              appears while the computer attempts to copy UNPACK2.EXE.
Action:       This Access Denied Error is caused by damage to the extended
              attribute data on the NetWare** Server.  To correct this problem,
              delete the old disk images on the server and create new OS/2 disk
              images.
SYS1200 and EC=00BF
Explanation:  The DOS environment cannot be created.
Action:       If you see the error message SYS1200 while attempting to use the
              Dual Boot feature to change to DOS, and you also see error code
              EC=00BF, check your CONFIG.SYS file.  Make sure your virtual DOS
              device drivers have not been remarked out of or removed from your
              CONFIG.SYS file.  If necessary, look at the CONFIG.SYS file in
              the OS2\INSTALL directory (the CONFIG.SYS file as it was
              originally installed) to see how the DOS device drivers should be
              listed.
SYS1201
Explanation:  A device driver specified in the CONFIG.SYS file cannot be found,
              is the incorrect device driver (ex. DOS device driver), or is
              specified twice within the file.
Action:       Make sure the correct device driver for the device is installed,
              and then check the CONFIG.SYS file to make sure the information
              specified is correct.
SYS1475
Explanation:  The file OS2BOOT cannot be found.  This is a hidden system file
              and must reside in the root directory of the drive from which the
              operating system is started.
Action:       Remove the diskette from drive A and restart the system.  If the
              problem was not caused by a diskette in drive A, then the OS2BOOT
              file might be missing.  Try the following procedure:
  1. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.
  2. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  3. When you are prompted to do so, remove the Installation Diskette and
     insert Diskette 1.
  4. Press Enter.
  5. When the Welcome to OS/2! screen appears, press F3 to display the command
     prompt.
  6. Reinsert the Installation Diskette.
  7. Type sysinstx c: and press Enter.  (If your operating system resides on a
     drive other than C, use the appropriate drive letter instead.)
              If this procedure does not correct the problem, it might be
              necessary to reinstall the operating system.
SYS1719
Explanation:  The file IBM386FS\HPFS386.IFS does not contain a valid device
              driver or file system driver.
Action:       Edit your CONFIG.SYS file and delete the following line:
              IFS=x:\OS2\HPFS.IFS
SYS2025
Explanation:  A disk read error occurred.  This might be a disk error or a
              damaged system boot record.
Actions:      Try the following:
  o  If this error occurred while the system was loading, follow the procedure
     in Recovering from Errors on the Hard Disk.
  o  If this error occurred when the system was reading the installation
     diskettes, there might be an error on the diskette.  If you already have
     an operating system installed on your computer, use the XDFCOPY command to
     make a copy of the installation diskettes.  Retry the installation with
     the newly copied diskettes.
  o  If your computer has BIOS supplied by AMI** or Phoenix**, you might need
     to upgrade the BIOS.  Refer to Chapter 17, "Special Hardware
     Considerations."
  o  If your system has a local bus IDE controller card, disable the BIOS on
     the 32-bit local bus IDE controller card and use the generic INT13 driver
     instead of IBM1S506.ADD.
  o  Make sure that there is not a hardware problem with your hard disk
     controller or your diskette drive.
SYS2026
Explanation:  The file OS2LDR cannot be found.  This is a hidden system file
              and must reside in the root directory of the drive from which the
              operating system is started.
Action:       Try the following:
              Make sure a non-system diskette is not in the diskette drive.  If
              a diskette is in the drive, remove it and restart the system.
              If the OS2LDR file is still missing:
  1. Insert the Installation Diskette into the diskette drive and restart the
     system.
  2. When prompted, remove the Installation Diskette and insert Diskette 1.
  3. When the Welcome to OS/2! screen appears, press F3 to access a command
     prompt.
  4. Copy the OS2LDR file from the Installation Diskette to the root directory
     on the OS/2 partition.
  5. Restart the system.
SYS2027
Explanation:  This message usually accompanies messages SYS1475 and SYS2025,
              and means that the system must be restarted.  See the explanation
              and actions for these messages for more specific information.
Action:       Insert a system diskette and restart the system.
SYS2028
Explanation:  The system cannot find the OS2KRNL file.  This is a hidden system
              file and must reside in the root directory of the drive from
              which the operating system is started.
Action:       Try the following:
  1. Insert the Installation Diskette into the diskette drive and restart the
     system.
  2. When prompted, remove the Installation Diskette and insert Diskette 1.
  3. When the Welcome to OS/2! screen appears, press F3 to access a command
     prompt.
  4. Copy the OS2KRNLI file from the Installation Diskette to the root
     directory of the OS/2 partition.  Type: A:OS2KRNLI C:\OS2KRNL and press
     Enter. (Where A: is the diskette drive containing the Installation
     Diskette and C: is the drive on which you are installing OS/2.) Notice the
     change in name of the OS2KRNL file.
  5. Remove the diskette from the drive.
  6. Restart the system.
SYS2029
Explanation:  The file OS2KRNL is damaged or not readable.
Action:       Copy the OS2KRNLI file from the Installation Diskette to the root
              directory of the drive containing the operating system.  Follow
              the instructions for error message SYS2028.
SYS2030
Explanation:  The system does not have enough memory to start the operating
              system.  OS/2 requires a minimum of 4MB of memory.
Action:       Add more memory to the system.
SYS3146
Explanation:  The system cannot find the OS2LDR.MSG file.  This is a hidden
              system file and must reside in the root directory of the drive
              from which the operating system is started.
Action:       Copy the OS2LDR.MSG file from the Installation Diskette to the
              root directory of the drive containing the operating system.
SYS3147
Explanation:  The OS2LDR.MSG file is not readable.  The file might be damaged.
Action:       Copy the OS2LDR.MSG file from the Installation Diskette to the
              root directory of the drive containing the operating system.
SYS3161
Explanation:  The system detected an 8086, 8088, or 80286 processor.  These
              processors are not supported by OS/2.
Action:       Upgrade your system so that your processor is compatible with the
              80386 processor.

Installation Diskette Problems 209/2

Following are solutions to problems that might occur while you are using the installation diskettes to install OS/2.

Diskette 1
If the installation procedure stops while Diskette 1 is in the diskette drive, there might be a problem with the features of the hard disk controller. If the controller has on-board disk caching, disable the caching. If the controller can do asynchronous memory refreshes, turn off that feature. Make sure that other IRQ settings do not conflict with the hard disk controller IRQ setting. If multiple hard disk controllers or hardcards are installed in the system, it might be necessary to remove one of them.
The following apply to machine-specific problems:
  • If you are installing on a system with an Allways** IN2000 SCSI adapter, and an IPE or FDISK error is displayed during the installation of Diskette 1. Upgrade your system to the current BIOS level of VCN:1-02. The Allways IN2000 SCSI adapter might require an EPROM upgrade to operate with OS/2. You might find that you have some problems when trying to install over DOS partitions. To correct these problems, you need to install the EPROM and reformat the hard drive.
  • If you are installing OS/2 on a Mylex** system, a TRAP0008 error occurs during the installation of Diskette 1. For more information on this error, contact Mylex.
  • If you are installing on a Compaq** 386/331 Deskpro system, a TRAP000D error occurs during the installation of Diskette 1. To correct this problem, do the following:
1. Make a copy of Diskette 1.  You will modify the copy.
2. Use a text editor to edit the CONFIG.SYS file that exists on the copy of Diskette 1.
3. Delete the following statement from the CONFIG.SYS file:
     BASEDEV=IBM2SCSI.ADD
4. Use the copy of the diskette during the installation process instead of the original.
Diskette 3
If the installation program continues to prompt you to insert Diskette 3, you have a 1.44 MB diskette drive that can work in either IBM* PC/XT* mode or IBM PCAT mode. Contact your service representative to determine if there are hardware-specific considerations.
Any Diskette
If several diskettes are successfully installed, then the system refuses a diskette and makes a beeping sound, your system might be infected with the Joshi virus. (This symptom usually appears after the first phase of the installation is complete and the system is restarted.) The Joshi virus is a DOS virus that interferes with OS/2 and causes random lockups. The Joshi virus:
  • Operates by trapping disk reads and writes. If the virus is active in memory, programs that try to locate the virus on diskette will have problems detecting it.
  • Is carried on the boot sector of an infected data diskette or system diskette. This virus originated in DOS but can survive in OS/2. When you start an infected system, the virus resides in memory and survives a Ctrl+Alt+Del startup. If you do not type Happy Birthday Joshi, the system will stop.
  • Is copied to the boot sector of every diskette. The virus will be transferred to any computer on which the user performed any diskette operation that included reading from, or writing to, the infected diskette.
  • Spreads from infected diskettes to DOS and OS/2 systems when the systems are started from diskettes.
  • Interferes with the startup from the hard disk of OS/2-based systems. The warning that OS/2 will give is that the IBM1FLPY.ADD file is bad or missing.

Many antivirus packages are effective at detecting this virus. In DOS, the Norton Antivirus Version 2.1 can both detect and clear the virus. In OS/2, Central Point Anti-Virus** can detect the virus. McAfee** Clean and Scan and IBM Anti-Virus/2* (AV/2) can both detect and clear the virus.

Installation Screen Problems 210/2

Following are solutions for problems you might have with your screen during the installation of OS/2.

White Screen during Installation

If the display screen is white during the installation of OS/2 and there is no system activity, set the video adapter to operate on an 8-bit mode and move the adapter to an 8-bit slot. Do the following:

  1. Turn off the computer and disable the autosensing capability of the video
     adapter.
  2. Modify the settings.  Refer to the documentation that came with your video
     adapter.
  3. Place the adapter in an 8-bit slot.  Then install OS/2.
  4. Return the adapter to the 16-bit slot and set back to the 16-bit mode.

White Screen with Disk Light On Constantly

If you are installing OS/2 on a fast 486 ISA-bus computer, you might encounter a white screen and the disk light constantly on. To correct this problem, try to reduce the speed of the computer by turning off the turbo mode of the computer. Refer to the documentation that came with your computer to find out how to change the mode.

Black Lines on an OS/2 Logo Screen

During the installation on a Gateway** 2000 with an 80486/66MHz processor, a local bus, and an ATI** Graphics Ultra Pro, the system will get to the screen with the colorful OS/2 logo, and then the installation will stop. The display screen shows horizontal bands of video separated by black bands that scroll horizontally across the screen. To correct this problem, do the following:

1. Start DOS.
2. At the DOS prompt, type CD \MACH32 and press Enter.
3. Type install and press Enter.
4. At the Main Selection screen, select Set Power Up Configuration.
5. Select Monitor Type and press Enter.
6. Select 1572 Monitor with 72Hz Refresh Rate and press Enter.
7. Select IBM Default (or 60Hz) as the new display.

Note: After OS/2 is successfully installed, repeat the steps to reselect the 1572 Monitor type.

Installation CD-ROM Problems 211/2

Cannot Access CD-ROM During Installation

If the device driver for your CD-ROM is not included in the OS/2 package, but is available from the CD-ROM manufacturer, you can modify Diskette 1 to add the device driver. Refer to "Chapter 17, Special Hardware Considerations" for instructions.

If you cannot access your CD-ROM drive during installation from a CD, but you can access the drive using DOS, you can install OS/2 using disk images. Disk Images are copies of the installation program that you put on diskette. You create disk images by using the XDFCOPY utility program to copy images from the CD to diskettes. You then use these diskettes to install OS/2.

Note: Installation diskettes are in a special format called XDF. The only command you should use with an XDF disketee is XDFCOPY.

Be sure to use formatted diskettes for this procedure. To find out exactly how many diskettes you will need:

  1. Place the CD in the CD-ROM drive
  2. Type: DIR X:\DISKIMGS\OS2\35 /W (where: X is the drive letter of your
     CD-ROM drive and 35 is the diskette size.)
  3. Press Enter.  A list of files will appear on your display.
  4. Count the files that end with the extension .DSK.  Each .DSK file will
     require a separate diskette.
Use the following command to create each disk image:
X:\DISKIMGS\XDFCOPY
X:\DISKIMGS\OS2\size\diskname.dsk Y:
where:
X:                       is the drive letter of the CD-ROM drive.
\DISKIMGS\XDFCOPY        is the location and name of the program used to create
                         the diskettes
DISKIMGS\OS2\size        is the location of the files containing the disk
                         images. Substitute 35 for the size parameter.  Use 35
                         for 3.5-inch 1.44MB and 2.88MB diskettes.
diskname.dsk             is the disk image file name (for example, DISK0.DSK).
Y:                       is the drive letter of your diskette drive.
For example, to create the Installation Diskette (DISK0.DSK) on a 3.5-inch
diskette, type the following and press Enter.
E:\DISKIMGS\XDFCOPY E:\DISKIMGS\OS2\35\DISK0.DSK A:
Where: E: is the CD-ROM drive and A: is the diskette drive.

Miscellaneous Installation Problems 212/2

Following are solutions to miscellaneous problems that might occur while you are installing OS/2.

Missing Device Driver Needed for Installation

If the device driver needed to install OS/2 on your computer is missing from the installation diskettes, obtain the device driver from either the device manufacturer or a bulletin board, then do the following:

  1. Make a backup copy of Diskette 1.
  2. Copy the needed device driver file (.ADD) to the backup copy of Diskette
     1.
  3. Edit the CONFIG.SYS file on the backup copy of Diskette 1 and change the
     BASEDEV= statement to include the file name and extension of the new
     device driver.  Example:  BASEDEV=IBM1FLPY.ADD
  4. Save the file, and use the updated copy of Diskette 1 to install OS/2.
Computer Beeps Constantly
If your computer beeps constantly while you are changing diskettes during
installation, you might have a defective diskette drive controller or cable.
Check the controller and cable for damage, and also check all their
connections.
Promise IDE Cached Controller
To install OS/2 on a system with a Promise IDE Cached Controller, you must edit
the CONFIG.SYS file on Diskette 1 and change the following line:
BASEDEV=IBM1S506
to
BASEDEV=IBM1S506 /!SMS
ATI Graphics Ultra Pro Adapter
ATI makes various display adapters that are comparable with the IBM 8514/A
display adapter.  The ATI Graphics Ultra, 8514 Ultra, and Graphics Vantage can
all be treated as IBM 8514/A adapters for the OS/2 installation process.
However, if you have an ATI Graphics Ultra Pro, you must follow these steps
before you install OS/2.  The INSTALL utility program used in the following
steps will set your display to run as a VGA display so that OS/2 can be
installed.  After OS/2 is installed, you can run the INSTALL utility program
again to select the correct display attached to the system.
Note:  Following these steps incorrectly might cause your system to hang with a
black screen or distort your display with static.  Refer to the ATI
documentation if you encounter problems configuring the Ultra Pro memory.
To prepare your ATI Graphics Ultra Pro adapter for use with OS/2:
  1. Start your system using DOS, preferably from a diskette.  You will need to
     start DOS again after OS/2 is installed because the ATI INSTALL utility
     program runs only in DOS.
  2. Type INSTALL at the DOS command prompt.
  3. If your adapter has 1MB of video memory, select SHARED.  If your adapter
     has 2MB of video memory, ensure that the aperture is properly configured.
  4. Select Monitor Setup.
  5. Select Custom.
  6. Set the refresh rate for 640 x 480 to IBM DEFAULT (or 60Hz).
  7. Set the refresh of all other resolutions as appropriate for your display.
  8. Save the configuration.
  9. Install OS/2.  Make sure that during the installation of OS/2, you select
     8514 as the primary display type.
IBM PS/2* Model 30-286 Upgrades
OS/2 is not supported on IBM PS/2 Model 30-286 upgraded to a 386
microprocessor.
Aox** Systems
If your computer has an Aox add-in microprocessor adapter and you encounter
problems either installing or starting up your OS/2 system, call the Aox
Corporation and ask for the latest "flash-prom" code upgrade.
IOMEGA** PC Powered Pro 90
If you are using an IOMEGA PC Powered Pro 90, call the IOMEGA service number
and request OAD Driver Version 2.3.
IBM PS/2 Model 90 and 95 Computers
  o  If you are experiencing problems with your Model 90 or 95, ensure your
     system is at the latest engineering change (EC) level. Your IBM service
     representative can assist you.
  o  You must ensure that you have matched pairs of single in-line memory
     modules.  This means that each pair of single in-line memory modules, as
     described in your technical reference manual, must be matched in memory
     size and speed.  Mixing these modules can cause some computers to report
     memory errors.
All ISA, EISA, and PCI Systems
If you are installing OS/2 on a ISA, EISA, or PCI system, some CMOS settings
might need to be adjusted:
  o  Turn off ROM shadowing (system and video) if it is not essential to
     starting your system.
     Usually only extremely fast systems require ROM shadowing during a
     startup.  Do not turn ROM shadowing on again after installing OS/2.
  o  If you get a TRAP0002 error, add wait states (both read and write, if the
     option is given).  Add two wait states and see if the TRAP0002 error goes
     away.
     Note:  Take as few of the actions here as are necessary to prevent the
     TRAP0002 error, because you must retain whatever setting makes the system
     function.  If you added wait states, do not remove them later without
     adding faster (matched) DRAM to your system.
  o  If you experience other traps or complete system hangs while installing,
     turn off your external processor cache (internal cache is not a problem).
     If this corrects the problem, have the system board repaired or replaced
     before you turn on the cache again.

Solving Problems After Installation 213/1+

This chapter provides information to help you solve problems you might encounter after OS/2 has been installed. It includes information about what to do if you have problems, plus specific instructions for startup, memory, display, mouse, CD-ROM, hard disk, and Desktop problems. In addition, procedures are given for recovering the Desktop, CONFIG.SYS file, user INI file, hard disk, and memory state data. Use the table of contents at the beginning of this chapter to locate the information dealing with a particular problem.

What to Do If You Have Problems 214/2

OS/2 is a stable operating system and, in most cases, you will not experience problems. However, if you do encounter a problem while using OS/2, do the following:

  1. Read through this chapter to see if the problem you are experiencing is documented.
  2. If your problem is not addressed in this section, refer to the Service and Support brochure in your OS/2 package for instructions on how to get additional assistance.

Before you call for assistance, make sure you call from a telephone that is near your computer and gather the following before you speak with the OS/2 specialist:

  • Your registration number (located in the Service and Support brochure in the US only)
  • The brand and model of the equipment you are using
  • The error message or number, if any, that appeared on your screen
  • Paper and pencil for taking notes
  • The number for your fax machine, or the number of a fax machine to which you have access

Editing the CONFIG.SYS File in Your Root Directory 215/2

A CONFIG.SYS file contains lines of instructions that control how your computer starts up and how it works with the devices you have attached to it. During installation, the CONFIG.SYS file is copied from Diskette 1 and added to your root directory. There might be instances in which you will be instructed in this chapter to edit your CONFIG.SYS file in order to add a statement, "remark out" a line, or modify an existing line in the file. If you need to alter the CONFIG.SYS file after you install OS/2, you will need to make the changes to the CONFIG.SYS file located in the root directory on the hard disk (usually drive C). Note: If the CONFIG.SYS file is changed incorrectly, you might not be able to restart your computer. Be careful when editing the file.

To edit the CONFIG.SYS file that is in your root directory (after installing OS/2), follow these steps:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Type COPY CONFIG.SYS CONFIG.OLD and press Enter.
  4. Type E C:\CONFIG.SYS and press Enter.
     where: E is the command used to start the System Editor that comes with
     OS/2
                C: is the letter of the drive where OS/2 was installed
                \ is the symbol for root directory
     The CONFIG.SYS file will appear on your screen, and you can make changes
     to it.
  5. When you are done working on the file, select File, then select Save.
  6. Select Type... in the Save notification window.
  7. Select Plain Text, then select Set.
  8. Press Alt+F4 to exit from the System Editor.
  9. Shut down your computer.  (You must restart your computer anytime you make
     changes to the CONFIG.SYS file in order for the changes to take effect.)

For more information about the statements that can appear in the CONFIG.SYS file, refer to the Command Reference that is located in the Information folder on the OS/2 Desktop.

Startup Problems 216/2

Following are solutions to problems that might occur when you try to start your system after installing OS/2.

Internal Processing Error Message Appears

The system stops and the screen displays INTERNAL PROCESSING ERROR at the top of a message. Record the information exactly as it displayed on the screen, and write a description of what you were doing when the trap occurred. Then, refer to the Service and Support information in your OS/2 package for instructions about calling for additional assistance. Boot Manager Menu Does Not Appear: If you installed the Boot Manager partition but the Boot Manager startup menu does not appear as expected when you start the system, you will need to make the Boot Manager partition startable. Do the following:

  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.

System Will Not Start DOS from the Boot Manager Menu

On a system with a VESA** SUPER I/O controller and two disk drives, the system might not start from the Boot Manager menu. Instead, it will display a

non-system disk or disk error message.  For more information on this message,
check the VESA controller documentation or contact the manufacturer.
Dual Boot Does Not Work
If the BOOT command is unsuccessful when you try to switch from DOS to OS/2,
you might have one or more active terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR) or DOS
cache programs.  If so, end the programs before you use the BOOT command.  For
TSR programs that are loaded from AUTOEXEC.BAT, you must deactivate the
programs before using the BOOT command.
Error When Using Dual Boot on a PS/1 System
On PS/1 systems preinstalled with DOS 5.0, using Dual Boot from OS/2 to DOS
might result in an error.  To correct this problem, press Ctrl+Alt+Del to
restart the system.

Memory Problems 217/2

Following are solutions to problems you might encounter with memory after installing OS/2. IBM PS/2 Model 90 or 95 Memory Parity Errors If your Model 90 or 95 is a 33 MHz system and you are having difficulty identifying intermittent memory parity errors such as TRAP0002, which force you to restart your system, then ECA053 might apply. If your microprocessor card has part number 84F9356, contact your IBM representative to assist you with a replacement. IBM PS/2 Model 90 Memory Errors If your Model 90 is experiencing intermittent memory errors, ECA084 might apply if the part number of your memory riser card is N33F4905 or 84F9356. Your IBM representative can assist you with a replacement.

Display Problems 218/2

Following are solutions to problems you might encounter with your display after installing OS/2. White Screen after Installation If the display screen is white after installation and there is no system activity, set the video adapter to operate on an 8-bit bus and move the adapter to an 8-bit slot. If possible, disable the autosensing capability of the video adapter. For information on modifying these settings, refer to the documentation that came with your video adapter. Blank Screen after Installation If the Desktop appears to be blank when you restart the system after the complete installation of OS/2, and you are using a ProComm** Micro Channel* SCSI adapter, do not attempt to run CHKDSK on the drive connected to the adapter. Contact ProComm to receive the device driver needed for the SCSI card. System Stops at Logo Screen If you have a Future Domain 16xx SCSI controller, you might have installed OS/2 successfully but then found a problem the next time you started OS/2. If the system stopped running with the logo screen displayed, there might be a conflict with the interrupt settings of your hardware devices. Check all interrupt request (IRQ) settings on all your hardware devices and make sure that each one is using a unique IRQ. Future Domain controllers are shipped from the factory preset to use IRQ5. However, IRQ5 is the interrupt that is normally assigned to LPT2. Also, it is common for IRQ5 to be used by sound or communications adapters. You might not see a problem immediately because of interrupt conflicts, but eventually a problem can occur. System Will Not Restart on a High-Resolution Display If you installed support for a high-resolution display adapter and your system will not restart, follow the procedure below. This procedure will set the adapter support to a lower resolution (VGA) but will enable your system to start.

  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press V.
  4. Use Selective Install to install support for another high-resolution
     display adapter.
Graphics Mode and Refresh Rates Incorrect for Hardware
Most video adapters are sensitive to the characteristics and capabilities of
the display attached to them.  The video BIOS on these adapters detects and
sets the hardware to support a desired graphics mode.
Some adapters have configuration dip switches to select desired vertical
refresh rates for high-resolution modes (800 x 600 and 1024 x 768).  Others are
shipped with DOS video-configuration utility programs that allow selection of
refresh rates. Usual refresh rates range from 56Hz to 72Hz non-interlaced or
88Hz interlaced.  The display has to be capable of synchronizing to this
frequency for proper mode set.
When the desired refresh rate has been set using either the dip switches or the
video-configuration utility program run the \OS2\SVGA.EXE utility program to
store the hardware setup in an \OS2\SVGADATA.PMI file.  At a DOS full-screen
session, type: C:\OS2\SVGA ON; then press Enter.
The Installation Program Installed VGA Support instead of SVGA
During the installation of OS/2, the installation program might have installed
only VGA support for your display.  To install the Super VGA (SVGA) drivers,
you can use Selective Install in the System Setup folder.  (System Setup is in
the OS/2 System folder).
Video Corruption or Stacked or Missing Icons
  1. Display the Desktop pop-up menu (click mouse button 2 on the OS/2 desktop
     background).
  2. Select Refresh to redraw the Desktop.
  3. If the screen goes blank, press Alt+Esc (to switch between the programs)
     to force repainting of the screen.
Synchronization Lost Under OS/2 But Not DOS
The resolution or refresh rate loses synchronization under OS/2 but not DOS.
To correct this problem, generate the \OS2\SVGADATA.PMI file under a specific
version of DOS using the following instructions:
  1. Start DOS.
  2. Type \OS2\SVGA ON DOS
  3. Press Enter.
  4. Type RENAME \OS2\SVGADATA.DOS \OS2\SVGADATA.PMI
  5. Press Enter.
  6. Restart OS/2.
If this does not fix the problem, try selecting a different vertical refresh
rate (refer to your adapter manual); then generate the PMI file again.
If your display remains out of synchronization or is stable and synchronized
after restarting the system but loses synchronization after a session switch,
this might be due to your video adapter's hardware implementation.
Note:  Some video adapter hardware cannot be fully saved and restored in all
graphics modes for all refresh rates.
Using After Dark** for Windows** with S3** Adapter
If you have an S3 adapter and are using After Dark for Windows, images that
move from left to right will not perform properly.
Switch to any resolution other than 640 x 480 x 16M.
Using Ventura Publisher** for Windows with an S3 Adapter
If you have an S3 display adapter and are using Ventura Publisher for Windows,
you might experience a General Protection fault when starting the program.
Switch to a 256-color resolution to avoid this problem.
Using Lotus 1-2-3 for OS/2 with S3 Adapter
If you have an S3 display adapter and are using Lotus 1-2-3 for OS/2 your
system might trap.
Switch to any resolution other than one using 16M colors.
Using Lotus** 1-2-3** for OS/2 or Lotus Freelance for OS/2
If you have an XGA or SVGA display adapter and are using Lotus 1-2-3 for OS/2
or Lotus Freelance** for OS/2, your system might trap.
Switch to a resolution that uses 256 colors or less.
Using WordPerfect** 5.1 or 5.2 for Windows with S3 Adapter
If you have an S3 display adapter and are using WordPerfect 5.1 or 5.2 for
Windows you might experience a General Protection fault when the Print Preview
option is selected.
Use any resolution other than the 800 x 600 x 64K or 600 x 480 x 16 million
color modes.
Using Software Motion Video Feature with S3 Adapter
If you have an S3 display adapter and are using the software motion video
feature you might experience poor performance of video playback in 64K-color
modes.
Normally, the software motion video feature will take advantage of a 1MB
aperture on video adapters and systems where it is available. For those systems
with nonstandard locations, the actual physical address of the aperture must be
provided in the following CONFIG.SYS statement:
SET VIDEO_APERTURE=xxxh
where "xxx" is a hexadecimal value in units of 1MB, representing the actual
physical address to map to the aperture.  For example, the IBM PS/ValuePoint*
systems must have the statement:
SET VIDEO_APERTURE=400h
to use a physical address at 1GB.
Blank Screen on IBM ValuePoint system
If you have one of the following IBM ValuePoint systems, you might encounter a
blank screen while switching from one window to another.
PS/ValuePoint Display Models:   6314    6317    6319
PS/ValuePoint System Models:    6382    6384    6387
To correct or avoid this problem, make sure that the flash EEPROM level of your
system is 62 or later.
To check the EEPROM level:
  1. Begin the Configuration Utility program by turning the system off and then
     on again.
  2. During the memory count, press F1.  (The memory count appears in the upper
     left corner of the screen as numbers followed by KB.)
  3. When the Configuration Utility screen appears, look for the Flash EEPROM
     Revision Level.
  4. The fifth and sixth characters in the Flash EEPROM Revision Level
     represent the actual revision level.
  5. If the revision level is less than 62, you must install the ValuePoint
     Flash BIOS update.
To get the required ValuePoint Flash BIOS update do the following: Access the
IBM PC Company Bulletin Board System, then download the VP2FL62A.DSK file,
which is the Flash BIOS Update Level 62.
If you do not have access to a modem, you can call the IBM Help Center and
request this update on diskette.
Video Corruption with Video 7** Adapter
If you experience minor video corruption when switching from an OS/2
full-screen session to the Desktop using Alt+Esc, exit the OS/2 session and
restart it.
Video Corruption Using 8514/A Adapter with WIN-OS/2
If you are running a WIN-OS/2 full-screen session with an 8514/A adapter in a
high-resolution mode, do not switch to a different session while the program is
updating the screen or displaying an hourglass.  The actual problem you
experience (for example, video corruption, system hang) depends upon what the
display driver is doing at the time of the switch.
Color Icons and Bit Maps Improperly Drawn
Windows programs that use color icons or color bit-map backgrounds must run in
the foreground to be properly drawn.  Do not switch from a Windows program
while it is being started or before it completes drawing color icons and color
bit-map backgrounds.
Discolored Bit Map Using 8514/A Adapter
If you are using an 8514/A display adapter, 256-color bit maps might become
discolored. after you start a WIN-OS/2 window session.
This discoloration is due to the sharing of the 256-color palette and should
not affect the running of the programs.
Corrupted Graphics in DOS Programs
Some DOS programs with graphics use a non-standard VGA mode that the adapter
can support, but the operating system cannot.  The graphics in these programs
might be corrupted when displayed in a window.  To avoid this problem run these
programs in DOS full-screen sessions.
Corrupted Colors in DOS Programs
Some DOS programs experience color corruption when running in a window on the
Desktop in VGA mode.  This is a limitation of the VGA mode because the color
palette of the DOS session has to be translated to the Presentation Manager*
and the Desktop in VGA mode does not offer enough colors to do an optimal
translation.
The best solution is to use an OS/2 display driver that supports the 256-color
mode or run the program in a DOS full-screen session.
Corrupted DOS Full-Screen Session on IBM ThinkPad* 750C Series
If you are using a ThinkPad 750C Series, after installing OS/2, you might find
that your DOS full-screen session is corrupted.  To fix this problem you must
reinstall the video driver from the ThinkPad video features diskette.
  1. Restart your system by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del.  Press Alt+F1 when the small
     white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your screen.
  2. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press V to return to VGA mode.
  3. Restart your system, and then reinstall the ThinkPad 750c video drivers
     from the ThinkPad video features diskette.
WIN-OS/2 Fails to Start on IBM ThinkPad
If a WIN-OS2 window fails to come up on an IBM Thinkpad, make sure that your
CONFIG.SYS file contains the following statement:
DOS=LOW,NOUMB
Also, make sure that the WIN-OS/2 settings have DOS set to LOW and UMB set to
OFF.
Notebook Computers Using DOS Window
Some notebook computers get a trap D error or other problems when a DOS window
is opened.  This error is caused by improper video register shadowing. To
correct the problem:
  1. Edit your C:\CONFIG.SYS file.
  2. Change
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\MDOS\VVGA.SYS
     to
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\MDOS\VSVGA.SYS
  3. Save the C:\CONFIG.SYS file.
  4. Shut down and restart the computer.
Text Strings Clipped on Display
OS/2 uses a system proportional font that is designed to meet the International
Organization for Standards (ISO) 9241 standard and the German DIN 66234
standard when using certain ISO compliant hardware. If you do not want to use
ISO compliant fonts, you can modify the OS2.INI file to install fonts that are
not ISO compliant.  Font changes made in the OS2.INI file are global across all
programs.  If you have REXX installed, you can type the following information
into a CMD file and use it to change the font.
 call RxFuncAdd "SysIni", "RexxUtil", "SysIni"
 AppName = "PM_SystemFonts"
 KeyName = "DefaultFont"
 FontName = "10.System Proportional Non-ISO"
 call SysIni "USER", AppName, KeyName, FontName||"0"x
 exit
After the file has been run, shut down and restart the system.
Poor Performance of Windows Programs Using 8514/A Adapter
If your system has an 8514/A adapter, you can improve the performance of your
Windows programs by changing their settings.  Open the Settings notebook for
each Windows program and change the following WIN-OS/2 settings:
     VIDEO_8514A_XGA_IOTRAP to OFF
     VIDEO_SWITCH_NOTIFICATION to ON
Corrupted Desktop with the ATI Graphics Ultra Pro Adapter
If your system has the 1MB version of the ATI Graphics Ultra Pro adapter with
the memory set to SHARED, some DOS programs running in the background might
corrupt the Desktop.
To correct this problem, you must upgrade to the 2MB version of the ATI
Graphics Ultra Pro and set the VGA memory to 256K or greater.
Note:  If you are using the 1MB version of the ATI Graphics Ultra Pro adapter
with the OS/2 8514/A display driver, the VGA memory must be set to SHARED.
System Hang Using PM Debugger
To correct this problem, use an XGA* or 8514/A adapter with the debugger. An
access violation will occur when you exit the debugger, but you will not have
to restart your system and you will not have system problems as a result of
using the debugger.
Video Corruption on XGA Display Using Windows Screen Savers
A Windows screen saver program that starts while in a background session might
display a corrupted image being displayed when you switch back to the Windows
session.  The image can be refreshed by moving the mouse or pressing any key.
You can eliminate this problem by changing your WIN-OS/2 settings for the
screen saver program using the Settings Notebook.  Change the settings to:
     VIDEO_8514A_XGA_IOTRAP to ON
     VIDEO_SWITCH_NOTIFICATION to OFF
Using Dual Displays (XGA and VGA)
If you are using a dual display system with XGA as the primary display and VGA
as the secondary display, you might see some minor corruption when the XGA
display is set to a resolution with 65536 colors.
This corruption will be on the display that does not have focus and will not
interfere with the operation of the system.
Using Dual Displays with Windows programs in a Window Session
On dual display configurations with XGA-2 as the primary display and VGA as the
secondary display, the DOS full-screen session might be corrupted if a Windows
program is started in a window session.
To recover from this situation, shut down and restart the system.
Using XGA-2 Adapter with Dual Boot
If you are using Dual Boot with an XGA-2 adapter, you must modify the
CONFIG.DOS file:
  1. Edit the \OS2\SYSTEM\CONFIG.DOS file.
  2. Locate the line
     DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE RAM 2048 X=nnnn-nnnn
  3. Change nnnn-nnnn to C000-CFFF.
  4. Save and exit the file.
Screen Corruption on IBM P75 Systems
On IBM P75 systems, there might be some corruption on the screen whenever
several icons are selected and moved together.
This corruption can be eliminated by selecting Sort from the Desktop pop-up
menu.
Limited Resolutions on IBM P75 Systems with External Displays
An IBM P75 system with an external display attached might only have the 640 x
480 x 16,772,216 resolution selection on the the System Settings Screen page.
If the external display is capable of displaying higher resolutions, use the
P75 Reference Diskette to disable the built-in plasma display.
Color Changes Behind Icons on XGA Displays
If you are using an XGA display, the diagonal lines behind the icons of open
objects might change color unexpectedly.
This does not interfere with the operation of the system.
Extra Lines on OS/2 System Clock on XGA Displays
If you are using an XGA display, extra lines might appear on the face of the
OS/2 System Clock between the quarter (:15) and half (:30) hour.
These lines do not interfere with the operation of the clock.
Display Power Management Signaling Not Enabled on XGA Displays
If you are using an XGA display, the XGA DMQS (\xga$dmqs\*.dqs) files in this
version of the operating system do not have DPMS (Display Power Management
Signaling) enabled for the DPMS supported displays.
You must use the DPMS OVERRIDE parameter provided with the Power Management
Utility program that is located in System Setup.
PS/ValuePoint System with Radius XGA Display Adapter
If you are using a Radius XGA display adapter on a PS/ValuePoint system, it
might not work correctly.
To correct this problem, you need to obtain and use the VPXGA.EXE utility
program. For a copy of this utility program, check your Radius Installation
Diskette or contact a service representative at Radius.
Zenith Data Systems** and Hewlett Packard Systems with Headland Adapters
Zenith Data Systems with Headland HT208 and Hewlett Packard systems with HT209
display a white half-screen whenever high-resolution modes are selected.
These systems do not support high-resolution modes even though you can
successfully install high resolution drivers and select the modes.  To correct
this problem, use Selective Install to install VGA.
ZEOS** Systems with Speedstar VGA
If you are using a ZEOS system with Speedstar VGA, the video display adapter
might not configure.
Use the VMODE utility program supplied with the system to configure the display
during the display driver installation.
Video Corruption with Sigma Legend** Adapter
If you have a Sigma Legend display adapter you might experience minor video
corruption on the Desktop when you switch between the Desktop and DOS if they
are running in different modes.
Use the DOS utility program that is packaged with this display adapter to set
the DOS session to the same mode as the Desktop.
System Hang with Sigma Legend Adapter
If you are using a Sigma Legend display in 1024 x 768 x 256 color mode, the
system might stop.
Use only 640 x 480 x 256 or 800 x 600 x 256 mode with this adapter.

Mouse Problems 219/2

The following information provides solutions to problems you might encounter with your mouse. Existing Mouse Not Working Correctly If the mouse you had connected to your computer before installing OS/2 now works improperly (movements appear "jerky" or the mouse does not respond when you move it), do the following:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open OS/2 Window.  If you installed OS/2 from a CD, continue with step 4.
     If you installed from diskettes, go to step 5.
  4. Type ATTRIB -R C:\OS2\MOUSE.SYS and press Enter (where c is the drive
     where OS/2 is installed).
  5. Insert the diskette that came with your mouse into drive A (this diskette
     contains the mouse device driver).
  6. Type COPY A:\MOUSE.SYS C:\OS2\MOUSE.SYS and press Enter (where C is the
     drive where OS/2 is installed).
  7. Shut down the system.
Mouse Not Working after Installation
If you installed a mouse during the installation of OS/2, or used selective
installation to install a new mouse and the mouse is not working, you will need
to edit your CONFIG.SYS file.  Do the following:
  1. Edit the C:\CONFIG.SYS file and press Enter (where C is the drive where
     OS/2 is installed).
  2. Delete the mouse device driver statements from the CONFIG.SYS file (there
     might be more than one such statement).  For example:
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\MOUSE.SYS
  3. Shut down the system, and then restart it.
  4. Use Selective Install to install a different mouse driver.
Serial Mouse Not Working
If the serial mouse is connected to a serial port, make sure that the serial
port is configured for default settings.
Logitech** Mouse Not Working after Installation
If you have a Logitech mouse that does not work after installation, you might
have to select another mouse driver.  Before 1991, Logitech sold "C-Series"
serial mice. Since 1991, Logitech has sold only "M-Series" Microsoft-compatible
serial mice.  To determine which mouse you have, look at the bottom of the
mouse.  If it says "CA" or "C7," then it is a C-Series mouse.  If not, then you
have an M-Series mouse.  Use Selective Install to select the correct Logitech
mouse driver.
Logitech Mouse Not Working after Dual Boot from DOS
If your Logitech mouse is not working on a Dual Boot system after you run DOS
and switch to OS/2, your mouse might be running in a mode set by a DOS-based
mouse device driver.  To correct the problem:
  1. If COM2 port is being used, switch back to DOS and type the following at
     the DOS command prompt:
     MOUSE PC
     or
     MOUSE 2 PC
     This will reset the mouse to a mode that is recognized by OS/2.
     Note:  You must use the MOUSE.COM that came with the mouse, or the command
     will not work.
  2. Then type the following:
     C:\OS2\BOOT /OS2
  3. Press Enter.  OS/2 should start and your mouse should work.
  4. If this does not work, disconnect and reconnect the mouse.
  5. If these methods do not work, close your programs and turn off the
     computer.  Then, turn the computer on again.
Mouse Does Not Work on an IBM PS/2 Model 90 or 95
If your Model 90 or 95 has the Unattended Start Mode option set (through the
System Programs), the mouse driver will not load during startup.
To correct this situation, disable the Unattended Start Mode.
Mouse Does Not Work on COM3 or COM4
OS/2 supports connection only to COM1 or COM2, at the standard input/output
(I/O) address and interrupt request (IRQ) setting.
Mouse Pointer Does Not Move
When you move your mouse, the mouse pointer on the screen does not move.
Verify that each device on your computer that uses an IRQ setting is not
conflicting with another IRQ setting.
Mouse Statements in CONFIG.SYS
The mouse statements that should appear in your CONFIG.SYS depend on the type
of mouse connected to your computer.
The correct CONFIG.SYS statements for running a serial mouse are:
DEVICE=C:\OS2\MDOS\VMOUSE.SYS
DEVICE=C:\OS2\POINTDD.SYS
DEVICE=C:\OS2\PCLOGIC.SYS SERIAL=COMx
DEVICE=C:\OS2\MOUSE.SYS TYPE=PCLOGIC$
Where:  C is the drive on which OS/2 is installed, and COMx is either COM1 or
COM2.
The correct CONFIG.SYS statements for running a Microsoft or IBM mouse are:
DEVICE=C:\OS2\MDOS\VMOUSE.SYS
DEVICE=C:\OS2\POINTDD.SYS
DEVICE=C:\OS2\MOUSE.SYS
Where:  C is the drive on which OS/2 is installed.
Three-button Mouse Not Working Correctly
You have a 3-button mouse and error SYS1201 is displayed on the screen.
OS/2 supports only the 2-button mode on a 3-button mouse.  If your mouse has a
switch to change to a 2-button mode, change the switch.  If it doesn't, replace
the mouse with a 2 button mouse.
Erratic Mouse Pointer in WIN-OS/2 Sessions
If you have an erratic pointer in your WIN-OS/2 programs.
Set the following WIN-OS/2 settings:
  o  MOUSE_EXCLUSIVE_ACCESS to On
  o  IDLE_SENSITIVITY to 100
  o  IDLE_SECONDS to 20
Mouse Not Recognized on Non-IBM Computer
If your mouse is not recognized on a non-IBM computer that has a mouse port
with an attached mouse, the mouse might be incompatible with the mouse port
because of the chip on the mouse adapter.
Attach the mouse to a serial port.  If the mouse still does not work, try a
different mouse with the mouse port.
Mouse and Keyboard Stop Working
If you have AMI BIOS, you might have an old version.  Contact your computer
manufacturer for an updated BIOS level.

CD-ROM Problems 220/2

Following are solutions to problems you might encounter with your CD-ROM after installing OS/2. Philips** CM 205 CD-ROM If you have a Philips CM 205 drive and it doesn't work with OS/2, edit your CONFIG.SYS file and change the line containing LMS205.ADD to LMS206.ADD. If your CD-ROM drive is not working correctly (does not respond, or generates errors when trying to read a CD), do the following:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open OS/2 Window.
  4. Insert the diskette that came with your CD-ROM drive into drive A. (This
     diskette contains the CD-ROM device driver.)
  5. Type the following, pressing Enter after each:
     COPY A:*.ADD C:\OS2\
     COPY A:*.IFS C:\OS2\
     COPY A:*.DMD C:\OS2\
     where * represents the actual name of the file.
  6. Edit the C:\CONFIG.SYS file and press Enter (where c is the drive on which
     OS/2 is installed).
  7. Add the following statements to the CONFIG.SYS file (if not already
     there):
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\CDFS.IFS /Q
     IFS=C:\OS2\CDFS.IFS /Q
     BASEDEV=OS2CDROM.DMD
     BASEDEV=*.ADD
     where * represents the actual name of the .ADD file on the device driver
     diskette.
  8. If the following statement appears in the CONFIG.SYS file, change it from:
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\CDROM.SYS /Q /N:4
     to
     REM DEVICE=C:\OS2\CDROM.SYS /Q /N:4
  9. Shut down the system.
Problems with Sony, Mitsumi, or Hitachi** CD-ROM Drives
If you are using a Sony, Mitsumi, or Hitachi CD-ROM drive and cannot access it,
do the following:
  1. Copy the following files from Diskette 1 to the hard disk, as follows:
     COPY A:\OS2CDROM.DMD C:\OS2
     COPY A:\CDFS.IFS C:\OS2
  2. Edit your CONFIG.SYS file on the hard disk and add the following
     statements:
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\OS2CDROM.DMD /Q
     IFS=C:\OS2\CDFS.IFS /Q
  3. Shut down the system.
Problems with Sound Blaster CD-ROM Drives
If you are using a Sound Blaster CD-ROM drive with the device driver SBPCD2.SYS
and cannot access the drive, restart your system and do the following:
  1. Copy the following file from Diskette 1 to the hard disk, as follows:
     COPY A:\CDFS.IFS C:\OS2
  2. Edit your CONFIG.SYS file on the hard disk and add the following
     statement:
     IFS=C:\OS2\CDFS.IFS /Q
  3. Open OS/2 System.
  4. Open Selective Install from the System Setup folder.
  5. Select the icon next to CD-ROM Device Support on the System Configuration
     screen.
  6. Select OTHER from the bottom of the CD-ROM selection list; then select OK.
  7. When the selective installation is complete, edit the CONFIG.SYS file and
     delete the following line:
     DEVICE=C:\OS2\OS2CDROM.DMD /Q
  8. Shut down the system.

Hard Disk Problems 221/2

Following are solutions to problems you might have with hard disk drives after installing OS/2. Also refer to Recovery Procedures. Slow SCSI Support After installation, you might experience slow SCSI support. If this occurs, make sure that the hard disk and the controller card are both set for the ASYNCH mode or the SYNCH mode. Problem with Quantum Hardcard or IDE Controller Add the required switch settings (adapter number and IRQ level) to the IBM1S506.ADD device driver statement in your CONFIG.SYS file. If you need assistance with the switch settings or need a BIOS upgrade (for certain Quantum Hardcards), contact a service representative at Quantum. Hard Disk Controller Problem

  1. Determine the controller manufacturer, model number, and type.  Then,
     determine which device driver is installed for the controller (for
     example, FD7000EX.ADD).
  2. Verify that the installed device driver is the correct one.
  3. Verify that the BASEDEV= statements are correct in your CONFIG.SYS file.
     Verify that the correct device driver is listed in a BASEDEV= statement.
     Also, verify that the correct device driver is the only device driver
     listed for that controller.  For more information about BASEDEV=
     statements, refer to the Command Reference in the Information folder.
Cannot Set Up a Primary Partition
If you have more than two hard disk drives and you cannot set up a primary
partition on one of the hard disk drives, your BIOS could be preventing the
setup.
With OS/2, you can have a primary partition on two hard disk drives; however,
the BIOS in your computer determines which two hard disk drives can have
primary partitions.
Cannot Access Entire Hard Disk
Your hard disk drive has more than 1024 cylinders, and you cannot access the
entire drive space, the device driver for your controller might not support
more than 1024 cylinders.
If you have a non-IBM controller and device driver, contact the manufacturer of
the device driver to ask if your level of the driver supports more than 1024
cylinders.

Desktop Problems 222/2

Following are solutions to problems you might have with your Desktop after installing OS/2. System Stops Working The system stops and the keyboard and mouse do not respond.

  1. Press Ctrl+Esc or Alt+Esc and wait a few seconds to see if the system
     responds.
  2. Determine if you can move your mouse but cannot select any object when you
     press mouse button 1.
  3. Press the Caps Lock and Num Lock keys to see if their status lights come
     on.
  4. Record a description of what you were doing when the system stopped.  If
     any messages were displayed on the screen, be sure to record the message
     text and number.
  5. Refer to the Service and Support brochure in your OS/2 package for
     instructions about calling for additional assistance.
Missing Icons
After restarting your system, some of your Desktop icons might be missing.
Check the documentation for the hard drive and the controller card to ensure
that their settings are both set for the ASYNCH mode or the SYNCH mode.
Stacked Icons
If the objects on your Desktop appear to be stacked on each other, you can
refresh your Desktop:
  1. Position the mouse pointer on a blank area of the Desktop.
  2. Press mouse button 2.  A pop-up menu appears.
  3. Select Refresh.
  4. If your screen goes blank, press Alt+Esc to switch between programs and
     force the "repainting" of your screen.
DOS and Windows Programs Not Added to the Desktop
During the installation of OS/2, your existing DOS and Windows programs are
automatically added to your OS/2 Desktop. However, the installation program
might not find all programs (for example, programs located on remote servers).
If this happens, restart the system, then run the Add Programs to Desktop
utility program.  (Add Programs to Desktop is located in the System Setup
folder which is located in the OS/2 System folder.)
OS/2 2.x Programs Not Added to the Desktop
If you installed OS/2 on a system that already had OS/2 2.x installed on it and
your OS/2 2.x programs were not added to your Desktop, do the following:
  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.
  4. Delete the DESKTOP directory.
  5. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart your system.  The Desktop should be
     re-created.
  6. If the problem continues, re-create the INI files.  Follow the
     instructions in Rebuilding Your Desktop.
If you moved program groups off the Desktop and into a folder, you should move
them back on the Desktop before installing OS/2.  Otherwise, duplicate icons
could appear on the screen.  If you try to delete these icons, the original
icons will also be deleted.
Blank Desktop and Missing Objects
If the Desktop is blank, objects are missing, you cannot delete an object, or
you have another problem that involves objects, run the CHKDSK (check disk)
program until the results indicate there are no errors.  To run CHKDSK, do the
following:
  1. Insert the Installation Diskette in drive A. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart
     your system.
  2. When prompted, remove the Installation Diskette and insert Diskette 1.
  3. Press F3 in the Welcome screen to exit to the command prompt.
  4. Insert Diskette 2.
  5. Type: CHKDSK C: /F and press Enter (where: C: is the drive where OS/2 is
     installed).
For more information about CHKDSK, select Command Reference in the Information
folder.
Missing Objects in the OS/2 System Folder
Follow the instructions in Rebuilding Your Desktop.
Folders Open and Close Immediately
Follow the instructions in Recovering Archived System Files.
Missing, Empty, or Multiple Objects on Desktop
  o  The Desktop is missing objects or there is more than one icon for the same
     object.
  o  One or more Desktop folders are empty.
  o  After you shut down the computer and start it again, the objects on the
     Desktop are not displayed the same as when you shut down.
Recover the archived Desktop, using the procedure in Recovering Archived System
Files.
If that does not fix the problem, follow the instructions for Rebuilding Your
Desktop.
Object Cannot Be Deleted
If you cannot delete an object, do the following:
  1. Create a folder.
  2. Drag the object you want to delete to the new folder and drop it.
  3. Drag the new folder to the Shredder and drop it.
If you cannot shred the folder, do the following:
  1. At an OS/2 command prompt, type: CD DESKTOP and press Enter.
  2. After the DESKTOP directory opens, type: RD directory and press Enter.
     (Where: directory is replaced by the name of the directory (folder) that
     you want to delete.)

Recovery Procedures 223/2+

The procedures that follow provide information about recovering from Desktop problems and system failures, including:

  o  A damaged, unusable, or unstartable desktop
  o  An invalid CONFIG.SYS file
  o  A damaged INI file
  o  Hard disk errors
  o  A forgotten lockup password
Note:  Backing up your system regularly might help you avoid having to
re-create files in the event of a system failure.
If your Desktop becomes damaged, unusable, or unstartable, you can recover in
two ways:
  o  Use the Archive/Recover utility program to restore your Desktop to a
     previously saved state
  o  Rebuild your existing Desktop

Recovering Archived System Files 224/3

OS/2 has the capability of archiving key system files as well as the DESKTOP directory each time you start OS/2. The default setting for this feature is OFF. (The Archive function can be turned ON via the Archive page of the Desktop Settings notebook.) When the Archive function is turned ON, the state of the key system files and Desktop as they existed at the last three "starts" of OS/2 are saved. Each time you restart OS/2, the oldest set of archived system files is deleted and the current system files are saved. OS/2 also keeps a permanent archive of your Desktop and key files as they existed when OS/2 was first installed, so you can always restore your system to its original state. To use archived system files, do the following:

  1. Turn on your computer.  If your computer is already on, perform a shut
     down, then press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper-left corner of your screen
     (before the OS/2 logo screen appears), press Alt+F1.
  3. A screen appears, listing the three most recent archives.  Do one of the
     following:
       o  Type the number of the archive you want to use to restore your
          system.
       o  Type X to restore your system to its original state (as it was when
          you first installed OS/2).
       o  Type C to get an OS/2 command prompt (for example, if you want to
          edit your CONFIG.SYS file).
       o  Type V to reset your primary display to VGA (for example, if you
          think your Desktop is not damaged but cannot be seen because you need
          to reinstall your VGA device drivers).

Recovery Choices during Restart 225/3+

The Recovery Choices screen enables you to specify how the system is to restart while a restart is in progress. You can display the Recovery Choices screen during restart by pressing Alt+F1 when a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your screen. If you want the system to display the Recovery Choices screen each time it restarts, you can select Display Recovery Choices at every system restart on the Archive page of the Desktop Settings notebook. The Recovery Choices screen allows you to:

  o  Select the set of archived system files that the system is to use to
     restart
  o  Continue using the original installation files to restart, and go to a
     command line
  o  Continue using the current system files to restart, and reset your primary
     display to VGA
  o  Restart your system using a customized CONFIG.SYS file that you have
     created
Each set of archived files appears on the Recovery Choices screen with the date
and time when the files were archived. The files are numbered 1, 2, 3 or, for
the original installation files, X.  Select the files that you want the system
to restart with by pressing 1, 2, 3, or X on your keyboard.  The system will
continue to restart using the set of archived files represented by the number
you pressed.
To go to a command line without changing the system files, press the C key on
your keyboard.
To reset your primary display to VGA, press the V key on your keyboard.
The character keys that you press can be uppercase or lowercase letters.
To restart your system using a customized version of the CONFIG.SYS file, enter
an alphabetic character that corresponds to the name of a CONFIG.SYS file that
you have created. Creating Your Own CONFIG.SYS Files describes how to create
and name your own customized version of CONFIG.SYS.  Displaying Your CONFIG.?
Choices on the Recovery Choices Screen describes how to display your customized
CONFIG.SYS choices on the Recovery Choices screen.

Creating Your Own CONFIG.SYS Files 226/4

In some cases, you need different CONFIG.SYS files to create environments that are specific to the kinds of work you are doing. For example, when you use a laptop computer with a docking station, you might want a CONFIG.SYS file that supports your laptop computer and one that supports your regular machine. You can create different versions of the CONFIG.SYS file, and, during restart, specify from the Recovery Choices screen which version the system is to use. You can also customize the Recovery Choices screen to display your customized CONFIG.SYS file choices. The following steps describe how to create and use multiple CONFIG.SYS files. In these steps, ? is any unique single alphabetic character except: X, x, C, c, V, or v. These steps use C as the root directory. If you installed OS/2 on a drive other than C, replace the C in the path name with your own root directory.

  1. Save a copy of the current CONFIG.SYS file.
     You can save a copy of the current CONFIG.SYS file by copying it to a
     diskette.  Otherwise, you can copy the current CONFIG.SYS file to the
     C:\OS2\BOOT subdirectory, and rename it to CONFIG.?.  If you copy and
     rename CONFIG.SYS, be sure to make a note of the new name and directory so
     you can restore it later.
  2. On the C:\OS2\BOOT subdirectory, create a file called CONFIG.? and
     customize it with the modifications that you need.
  3. Copy your customized CONFIG.? file to the current CONFIG.SYS file.
     There are two ways to copy your CONFIG.? file. You can enter the copy
     command at the OS/2 command prompt, or you can create an OS/2 batch file
     that will run during restart after the system processes C:\CONFIG.SYS.
       a. Replacing Your CONFIG.SYS file with CONFIG.?
          If you have only one customized CONFIG.? file, or if you do not plan
          to change between CONFIG.SYS and CONFIG.? often, you might choose to
          copy over CONFIG.SYS with your customized CONFIG.? file. Copying over
          C:\CONFIG.SYS with your customized CONFIG.? file replaces CONFIG.SYS
          in the root directory, and makes your customized file the default
          CONFIG.SYS file.
          The command to copy your customized file to the current CONFIG.SYS
          file is:
          COPY C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.? C:\CONFIG.SYS
          Using your customized CONFIG.? file as the default file allows you to
          restart without selecting a CONFIG.? file at the Recovery Choices
          screen.
          You can now restart your system. When you restart, the system will
          automatically use the file in the root directory named CONFIG.SYS.
       b. Creating a Batch File to Replace CONFIG.SYS with CONFIG.?
          If you have several customized CONFIG.SYS files, using the batch file
          allows you to specify the CONFIG.? you want to use without entering
          multiple copy commands.  You can simply change the ? character in
          your batch file, and enter that character at the Recovery Choices
          screen.
          Create a batch file on C:\OS2\BOOT, and name it ALTF1?.CMD, where ?
          is the character that you used in the name of your CONFIG.? file. Put
          the following COPY command in the batch file.
          COPY C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.? C:\CONFIG.SYS
          Display the Recovery Choices screen by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del to
          restart your system and then pressing Alt+F1.
          At the Recovery Choices screen, press the key for the ? single
          character in the name of the CONFIG.? file you want to use.
          The system continues the restart using your customized CONFIG.? file.
          Note:  If you enter a character from the Recovery Choices screen for
          which there is no corresponding ALTF1?.CMD batch file, the system
          will use the CONFIG.? file that corresponds to that character.  If no
          CONFIG.? file corresponding to that character exists, the system will
          return to the Recovery Choices screen.
          Example
          The following example shows how to create a CONFIG.SYS file named
          CONFIG.A, and a batch file to copy it during restart.  The system is
          installed on the C drive.  Before you start, save a copy of your
          current CONFIG.SYS file.
            1. Copy the system version of CONFIG.SYS into a new file called
               CONFIG.A
               COPY CONFIG.SYS C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.A
            2. Change to the C:\OS2\BOOT directory
               CD OS2
               CD BOOT
            3. Edit CONFIG.A to customize it, and save your changes
               E CONFIG.A
            4. Edit a file called ALTF1A.CMD file
               E ALTF1A.CMD
            5. Put the following COPY command into ALTF1A.CMD, and save your
               changes
               COPY C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.A C:\CONFIG.SYS
            6. Restart your system by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del.  Press Alt+F1 when
               the small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of
               your screen.
            7. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press the letter A.

Displaying Your CONFIG.? Choices on the Recovery Choices Screen 227/4

You can customize your Recovery Choices screen to display the list of customized CONFIG.? files that you created. Customizing the Recovery Choices screen will help you to remember which character to enter for a particular version of CONFIG.?, by displaying your selections. To customize the Recovery Choices screen, edit the file C:\OS2\BOOT\ALTF1BOT.SCR. (If you installed OS/2 on a drive other than C, specify the drive on which OS/2 is installed.) You can add up to 6 lines of text to the bottom of this file. Each line that you add should represent a single CONFIG.? file that you created.

Each line should include the alphabetic character that identifies that CONFIG.?

file. You might also want to include a brief, one-line description of when to use that version of the CONFIG.? file. For example, to display the option for the CONFIG.A file on the Recovery Choices screen, you might add the following to the file C:\OS2\BOOT\ALTF1BOT.SCR: A CONFIG.A (file for laptop computer)

Rebuilding Your Desktop 228/3

Use the following procedure if the Archive/Recover procedure did not restore your Desktop, this procedure will rebuild the Desktop by making new INI files.

  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.
  4. Change to the OS/2 directory on your hard disk.  Type the following
     commands and press Enter after each:
     C:
     CD\OS2
  5. Type the following commands and press Enter after each:
     MAKEINI OS2.INI INI.RC
     MAKEINI OS2SYS.INI INISYS.RC
  6. Delete the hidden file, WP?ROOT.?SF, from the startable partition.  Type
     the following commands and press Enter after each:
     ATTRIB -h -s -r \WP?ROOT.?SF
     DEL \WP?ROOT.?SF
  7. Restart the system.

Recovering the CONFIG.SYS File 229/3

The CONFIG.SYS file contains command statements that are used to configure your system during startup. If the file is changed incorrectly, you might not be able to restart the system or edit the file. (For example, some programs write information to the CONFIG.SYS file when they are installed. In some cases, this information can cause the CONFIG.SYS file to be unusable.) To recover the original version of the CONFIG.SYS file (as it was created when OS/2 was installed), you can use the following procedure:

  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.
  4. Type C: and press Enter (where C represents the drive on which your
     operating system resides).
  5. Rename the damaged CONFIG.SYS file.  For example, type:
     REN CONFIG.SYS CONFIG.BAD
  6. Press Enter.
  7. Copy the backup version of the CONFIG.SYS file to the root directory of
     the drive where your operating system resides.  (The CONFIG.SYS backup
     file was created during OS/2 installation).  Type:
     COPY C:\OS2\INSTALL\CONFIG.SYS C:\CONFIG.SYS
  8. Press Enter.
  9. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart your system.
As stated, this procedure reestablishes the original version of the CONFIG.SYS
file (as it was created during OS/2 installation).  If you made any changes to
the CONFIG.SYS file after that time, you will have to edit the newly copied
CONFIG.SYS file and add those changes.

Recovering the User INI File 230/3

The OS2.INI file, also referred to as the user INI file, is an operating system startup file that contains system settings such as program defaults, display options, and file options. The OS2SYS.INI file, also referred to as the system INI file, is an operating system file that contains information about installed fonts and printer drivers. If you receive a message that the OS2.INI file has been "corrupted", replace both the OS2.INI file and the OS2SYS.INI file on your hard disk.

Use the following procedure to replace these two files with versions containing

default values:

  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.
  4. Type C: and press Enter (where C represents the drive where your operating
     system resides).
  5. Type CD \OS2 and press Enter.
  6. Type ATTRIB -s -h -r OS2*.INI and press Enter.
  7. Type REN OS2.INI OS2.OLD and press Enter.
  8. Type MAKEINI OS2.INI INI.RC and press Enter.
  9. Type REN OS2SYS.INI OS2SYS.OLD and press Enter.
 10. Type MAKEINI OS2SYS.INI INISYS.RC and press Enter.
 11. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart your system.
You can protect your INI files by having them automatically backed up each time
you start your system.  For example, if you include the following statements in
your CONFIG.SYS file, a backup copy of your current INI files and a backup copy
of the INI files as they existed at the previous system startup will be made.
(Note that this example assumes that OS/2 is installed on drive C.  Use the
letter of the drive on which you have OS/2 installed.)
CALL=C:\OS2\XCOPY.EXE C:\OS2\*.INX C:\OS2\*.INY
CALL=C:\OS2\XCOPY.EXE C:\OS2\OS2*.INI C:\OS2\*.INX
By copying the INI files this way, you will always be able to recover a recent
version of these files in case the user INI file becomes damaged.

Recovering from Errors on the Hard Disk 231/3

The CHKDSK command with the parameter /F can be used to correct disk and directory errors. However, when you use the /F parameter, no activity can occur on the disk. Therefore, if you need to correct errors on the drive from which you normally start OS/2, you must use the version of CHKDSK that is on the installation diskettes (or installation CD) instead of the version that has been installed on the hard disk. You can also use the version of CHKDSK on the installation diskettes or CD if the disk is in use or locked by another process. To run CHKDSK /F using diskettes:

  1. Insert the Installation Diskette in drive A. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart
     your system.
  2. When prompted, remove the Installation Diskette and insert Diskette 1.
  3. Press F3 in the Welcome screen to exit to the command prompt.
  4. Insert Diskette 2.
  5. To correct the errors on your hard disk, type CHKDSK C: /F:2, then press
     Enter.  (Where: C: is the drive on which OS/2 is installed.)
  6. Remove the diskette from drive A.
  7. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart your system.
To run CHKDSK /F from a CD:
  1. Insert the Installation Diskette in drive A. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart
     your system.
  2. When prompted, remove the Installation Diskette and insert Diskette 1.
  3. Press F3 in the Welcome screen to exit to the command prompt.
  4. Insert the OS/2 CD into the CD-ROM drive and press Enter.
  5. Type E: (where E is your CD-ROM drive) and press Enter.
  6. Type CD\OS2IMAGE and press Enter.
  7. Type CD DISK_2 and press Enter.
  8. To correct the errors on your hard disk, type CHKDSK C: /F:2, then press
     Enter.  (Where: C: is the drive on which OS/2 is installed.)
  9. Press Enter.
Recovering Memory State Data    232/3

The process OS/2 uses to recover the state of memory at the time of a failure is called a memory dump. A memory dump is performed when a problem is difficult to reproduce or other methods of problem determination do not identify the problem.

Memory dump information can then be analyzed by a team of technical experts and

determine the cause of the problem. Important Do not perform a memory dump unless your Service and Support Group has recommended this action. :enote. There are two types of memory dumps:

  o  Manual memory dump (used for system hangs and traps that cause the system
     to stop)
  o  Automatic memory dump (used for application programs, system traps, and
     internal processing errors)
A system memory dump can be placed on a FAT hard-disk partition or formatted
diskettes.
Different situations determine which type of memory dump is needed.  Refer to
the Service and Support brochure in your OS/2 package for instructions about
calling for additional assistance.
Using TRACE in CONFIG.SYS File
Before you create the memory dump diskettes, you must use the OS/2 Event
Tracing Service to capture a sequence of system events.  To enable system
event-tracing, add the following statements to your CONFIG.SYS file:
TRACEBUF=63
TRACE=ON
The default for TRACE=ON is to trace all static system events.
Restart your system to activate TRACE.  Also, turn on two dynamic trace points
as follows:
  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open OS/2 Full Screen or OS/2 Window.
  4. Type the following at the command prompt:
     trace on kernel   (press Enter)
     trace on doscall1 (press Enter)
Performing the Memory Dump
If you are sending a memory dump to diskettes, you must use formatted
diskettes.  Generally, one 1.44MB diskette is used for each 2MB of RAM.  For
example, if you have a 16MB system, you will probably use eight 1.44MB
formatted diskettes.
If you are sending a memory dump to a hard disk, you must first create a FAT
partition labeled SADUMP and give it a size greater than the amount of physical
memory (RAM) in your system.  For example, if your system has 16MB of RAM, set
the size of the SADUMP partition to 17MB.
To run a memory dump, the Memory Dump facility must be started manually or
automatically as follows:
To start it manually:
Press and hold down the Ctrl and Alt keys, and then press the Num Lock key
twice.  After a few seconds, the screen clears; after a minute the system beeps
and one of the following messages is displayed:
When dumping to diskettes:
Insert a formatted diskette to commence dumping.
When dumping to a hard disk:
The memory dump is being performed.
The total amount of memory to be dumped is xxxx.
To start it automatically:
Type one of the following statements in your CONFIG.SYS file and restart your
system:
TRAPDUMP=OFF,drive letter:
TRAPDUMP=ON,drive letter:
TRAPDUMP=R0,drive letter:
where:
  o  TRAPDUMP=OFF,drive letter: indicates that no automatic dump is to be
     taken.  This is the default value; it is generally used when initiating a
     manual memory dump.
     If REIPL=ON is specified in the CONFIG.SYS file, the system will restart
     automatically and no dump will be taken when a system trap or internal
     processing error occurs.
  o  TRAPDUMP=ON,drive letter: specifies the drive to which system dump
     information is written for any access violations.  The system will restart
     after the TRAPDUMP process has completed.  The default drive is A if no
     drive is specified.
  o  TRAPDUMP=R0,drive letter: specifies the drive to which system dump
     information is written for system traps and internal processing errors.
     The system will restart after the TRAPDUMP process has completed.  The
     default drive is A if no drive is specified.
TRAPDUMP now initiates a memory dump, depending on which TRAPDUMP statement is
placed in the CONFIG.SYS file.
Warning: Setting TRAPDUMP to ON or R0 enables your system to automatically
initiate a memory dump.  Do not enable TRAPDUMP unless you need to troubleshoot
your system and have been instructed to do so by your technical coordinator.
Note:  If dumping to diskettes, complete steps 1 through 5.  If dumping to hard
disk, skip steps 1 through 5 and read step 6.
  1. When prompted, insert the diskette labeled Dump Diskette 1 and press any
     key to start the dump process.  The following message will be displayed:
     The memory dump is being performed...
  2. When the memory dump has completed or the current dump diskette is full,
     the following messages are displayed:
     The diskette is full.  Insert another formatted diskette in drive A.
     The storage address ranges on this diskette are:
     DUMPDATA.xxx       yyy - zzz
     Press any key to continue.
     where xxx is the dump diskette number, yyy is the beginning memory
     address, and zzz is the ending memory address on the disk.
     Note:  If you press Enter without changing the diskette, the system will
     prompt you once more before the dump process overwrites the contents of
     the current diskette in the drive. :enote.
  3. Insert the next dump diskette into drive A and press any key.  This action
     continues the dump process and displays the following message:
     The memory dump is being performed...
     Warning: Any data on the dump diskettes will be overwritten by the Memory
     Dump facility.
  4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the dumping is completed and the following
     message is displayed:
     Insert memory dump diskette number 1 to complete dump.
     The storage address ranges on this diskette are:
     DUMPDATA.xxx        yyy - zzz
     Press any key to continue.
  5. You must reinsert Dump Diskette 1 at this point to properly terminate the
     dump process.  The control program will write the dump summary record to
     Dump Diskette 1 and end the process.  After the process has ended, the
     following messages are displayed:
     The memory dump has completed.  Remove the dump diskette and restart the
     system.
  6. When a memory dump is initiated, the system begins writing the system
     memory to the dump partition.  When completed, the system restarts
     automatically.
Mailing the Dump Diskettes
Do not send dump diskettes unless instructed by the Service and Support Group.
Diskettes must be clearly labeled with the identification number (which is the
PMR number that is provided by the Service and Support Group) and your name.
Also, be sure to number the diskettes.
Send the dump diskettes to the address provided by the Service and Support
Group.  Refer to the Service and Support brochure in your OS/2 package for
instructions about calling for additional assistance.
Recovering from A Forgotten Password    233/3

If you forgot your lockup password, you must use the LOCK.RC file located in the \OS2 directory to reconfigure the OS2.INI file. To do this:

  1. Turn on the computer.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.
  4. Change from drive A to the drive on which OS/2 is installed.  Type: C: and
     press Enter.
  5. Change to the OS2 directory.  Type CD \OS2 and press Enter.
  6. Type the following:
     MAKEINI OS2.INI LOCK.RC
  7. Press Enter.
  8. Restart the computer.

Video Procedures 234/1+

This chapter provides information to help you install and fine tune your OS/2 video. It includes supported chip sets and resolutions, instructions for changing video settings, plus specific procedures for SVGA, XGA, and LCD or Monochrome Plasma displays. Use the table of contents at the beginning of this chapter to locate the information.

Video Device Drivers for OS/2 235/2+

OS/2 contains video device drivers that support the chip sets found on many system boards and display adapters. The following table lists the supported chip sets and the video device driver that should be selected during installation.

Non-Accelerated Video Device Drivers 236/3

MANUFACTURER CHIP SET VIDEO DEVICE DRIVER
ATI Technologies ATI28800 256 color ATI Technologies ATI28800
Cirrus Logic CL-GD5422, CL-GD5424 Cirrus Logic
Headland Technologies HT209 256 color Headland Technologies HT209
IBM IBM VGA 16 color Video graphics adapter (VGA)
IBM IBM VGA256C IBM VGA256C
Trident Microsystems TVGA8900B, TVGA8900C 256 color Trident Microsystems TVGA8900
TSENG ET4000 TSENG Laboratories ET4000
Western Digital WD90C11, WD90C30, WD90C31 (in WD90C30 compatibility mode) 256 color Western Digital WD90C11, C30, C31 (C30 mode only)
NOTE: Use the Selective Install icon to change the resolution and number of colors for non-accelerated video device drivers.

Accelerated Video Device Drivers 237/3

MANUFACTURER CHIP SET VIDEO DEVICE DRIVER
IBM IBM 8514 Display Adapter 8514/A
IBM IBM XGA Extended graphic adapter (XGA)
S3 Corporation S3 86C801, 86C805, 86C928 S3 86C801, 86C805, 86C928
S3 Corporation S3 86C864 S3 864
Cirrus Logic Cirrus Logic 5426, 5428, 5430, 5434 Cirrus Logic 5426, 5428, 5430, 5434
Western Digital WD 90C24, 90C24A, 90C24A2, 90C31 WD 90C24 - 90C31
Western Digital WD 90C33 WD 90C33
ATI Technology MACH 32 ATI MACH 32
ATI Technology MACH 64 ATI MACH 64
TSENG ETW32, ETW32i, ETW32p TSENG ET4000/W32, /W32i, /W32p
Weitek Power 9000 Weitek Power 9000
NOTE: Not all system boards and display adapters that use these chip sets are supported. For more information about display adapter and chip set compatibility, select HELP from the Display Driver Install window in Selective Install or refer to the README file on the Installation Diskette.

These drivers will be installed in 640x480x256 colors by the OS/2 installation program. Use the system icon to change the resolution and number of colors if you are using any of the accelerated video device drivers except IBM 8514.

Supported Resolutions for Accelerated Drivers 238/3

The resolutions that can be set for a particular display adapter, are dependent on the:

  • Specific display adapter being used
  • Graphics accelerator chip set on the adapter
  • Video device driver being used
  • Amount of video memory on the adapter

The video device drivers shipped with OS/2 (see the previous table) support the following resolutions and number of colors. Not all of the device drivers support all of the resolutions. For more information about the resolutions supported by each adapter and device driver, select Help from the Display Driver Install window in Selective Install or refer to the README file on the Installation Diskette.

3 RESOLUTIONS     3 NUMBER OF       3 VIDEO MEMORY    3 NOTE
3                 3 COLORS          3 REQUIRED
3 640 x 480       3 256             3 1MB
3 800 x 600       3 256             3 1MB             3
3 1024 x 768      3 256             3 1MB             3
3 1280 x 1200     3 256             3 2MB             3
3 1600 x 1200     3 256             3 4MB             3
3 640 x 480       3 65,536          3 1MB             3
3 800 x 600       3 65,536          3 1MB             3
3 1024 x 768      3 65,536          3 2MB             3
3 1280 x 1024     3 65,536          3 4MB             3 2
3 640 x 480       3 16,777,216      3 1MB or 2MB      3 1,3
3 800 x 600       3 16,777,216      3 2MB             3 1,4,6
3 1024 x 768      3 16,777,216      3 4MB             3 1
3 1280 x 1024     3 16,777,216      3 4MB             3 1,2
3 1360 x 1024     3 16              3 1MB             3 5
3 NOTE:
3
3 1.  The Western Digital device drivers do not support
3     16,777,216 colors.
3 2.  Most adapter/chip set combinations do not support
3     these resolutions and colors.
3 3.  The amount of video memory required for this resol-
3     ution is dependent on the display adapter and the
3     video device driver installed.
3 4.  Display adapters with the TSENG W32p Rev A chip set
3     do not support this resolution.
3 5.  This resolution is supported only for XGA-2.
3 6.  Cirrus adapters require more than 2MB of video memory
3     for this resolution.

Installing a Video Device Driver 239/2

All display adapters must tailor their output to the capabilities of the display attached to the system. Unfortunately, there is no standard for communicating the capabilities of the display to the display adapter. The result is that many display adapters supply a program to define and select the type of display attached to the system. OS/2 responds to this situation by permitting the DOS display selection utilities provided by the manufacturers to be used to properly configure the system. OS/2 then configures the system in the same manner each time your computer is started. If no display is specified, many display adapters make an assumption about the type of display attached to the system. This default setting is designed to work with the widest range of displays possible; therefore, it is the safest choice. During this installation procedure, you will be asked to make a decision about whether you want to use the defaults for your display type, or use the display adapter utility program provided by the manufacturer of the adapter. You should use the utility program provided by the manufacturer if any of the following apply:

  o  Your display adapter is produced by Diamond Computer Systems, Inc..
  o  Your display supports non-interlaced operation only.
  o  Your display does not support VESA standard refresh rates.
  o  Your display adapter requires software configuration to function properly
     in DOS.
  o  You want to configure your system to take advantage of the full refresh
     capabilities of your display.
Note:  Using the utility program provided by the manufacturer requires exact
knowledge about the capabilities of your display.  If the wrong display type is
selected, your system might not start.
If you have an SVGA adapter in your system, you must restore it to work in VGA
mode before you can use the following instructions to install a different
adapter in your system.  See Preparing to Switch to a Different Display Adapter
for instructions.
To install a new display adapter or video device driver:
  1. Install the display adapter using the manufacturer's instructions.
  2. Restart your system.
  3. Open OS/2 System.
  4. Open System Setup.
  5. Open Selective Install.
  6. Select Primary Display or Secondary Display from the System Configuration
     window.
     Note:  A secondary display is used for only DOS and full-screen sessions.
     Even if two displays are attached to the system only one is active at a
     time.
  7. Select the display driver that you want from the list provided.  (If you
     are unsure of which driver to choose, select Help.)
  8. Select OK.
  9. Follow the instructions on the screen.

Video Settings 240/2

To change video settings for a program:

  1. Point to the program icon.
  2. Click mouse button 2.
  3. Select Settings.
  4. Select the Session tab.
  5. Select the DOS settings or WIN-OS/2 push button.
  6. Change the settings (See the online documentation for detailed a
     explanation of these settings).
  7. Select the Save push button.
  8. Close the Settings notebook.

SVGA Procedures 241/2+

The following procedures provide instructions for enabling and disabling SVGA after OS/2 is installed.

Enabling SVGA in WIN-OS/2 Full-Screen Sessions 242/3

You can enable WIN-OS/2 full-screen sessions to run in high-resolution (1024 x 768) mode while the OS/2 Desktop runs in VGA mode. To enable WIN-OS/2 full-screen sessions for SVGA: Note: Follow the instructions very carefully. Otherwise, you could cause your WIN-OS/2 sessions to become inoperable.

  1. Use Selective Install to install VGA (640 x 480) support for OS/2.
  2. Back up the SYSTEM.INI and WIN.INI files as follows:
       a. Open OS/2 System.
       b. Open Command Prompts.
       c. Open OS/2 Full Screen.
       d. At the C prompt, do the following:
            o  Type: CD\OS2\MDOS\WINOS2 and press Enter.
            o  Type: COPY WIN.INI WIN.BAK and press Enter.
            o  Type: COPY SYSTEM.INI SYSTEM.BAK and press Enter.
  3. Check the OS2\MDOS\WINOS2\SYSTEM directory for the desired high-resolution
     display device driver.
       o  If the device driver is already on the system, go to step 4.
       o  If the device driver is not found, use your OS/2 or Windows
          installation disk to copy the driver to the \OS2\MDOS\WINOS2\SYSTEM
          directory.
          For example, to use the OS/2 diskettes and install the 8514.DRV
          high-resolution device driver:
            a. Search the OS/2 installation diskettes for the WIN8514 and
               *F.FON files and then do the following:
                 -  DIR A:WIN8514 and press Enter
                 -  DIR A:*F.FON and press Enter
                   After you find the files, you have to unpack them.  The
                   files are packed with their standard target directory coded
                   into the packed file.
            b. Copy the file to the system disk in the proper directory, using
               the UNPACK utility program:
                 -  Type UNPACK A:WIN8514 and press Enter.
                 -  Type UNPACK A:*F.FON and press Enter.
                   The SVGA driver and font files are now unpacked and in the
                   correct directory.
  4. Edit the SYSTEM.INI file and find the following line:
     FDISPLAY.DRV=VGA.DRV
     This line specifies the device driver used in WIN-OS/2 full-screen
     sessions.
     Note:  DISPLAY.DRV is the driver used for Microsoft Windows. FDISPLAY.DRV
     is the driver used for WIN-OS/2 full-screen sessions. SDISPLAY.DRV is the
     driver used for WIN-OS/2 windowed sessions.
  5. Change this line to point to the high-resolution device driver that was
     unloaded in the steps above.  In this example, the device driver is
     8514.DRV.
     Note:  To install a different driver, substitute the name of your driver
     in the statement: FDISPLAY.DRV=8514.DRV
     The modified line should look like the following:
     FDISPLAY.DRV=8514.DRV
  6. Change the SYSTEM.INI font entries:
       o  In SYSTEM.INI, these entries are:
          FIXEDFON.FON=VGAFIX.FON
          OEMFONTS.FON=VGAOEM.FON
          FONTS.FON=VGASYS.FON
       o  For 8514/A, these entries must be changed to:
          FIXEDFON.FON=8514FIX.FON
          OEMFONTS.FON=8514OEM.FON
          FONTS.FON=8514SYS.FON
       o  Save the changes to the SYSTEM.INI file.
  7. Change the WIN.INI font entries
       o  In WIN.INI, the entries are:
          SYMBOL 8,10,12,14,18,24 (VGA RES)=SYMBOLE.FON
          MS SANS SERIF 8,10,12,14,18,24 (VGA RES)=SSERIFE.FON
          MS SERIF 8,10,12,14,18,24 (VGA RES)=SERIFE.FON
          SMALL FONTS (VGA RES)=SMALLE.FON
          COURIER 10,12,15 (VGA RES)=COURE.FON
       o  For 8514/A, these entries must be changed to:
          SYMBOL 8,10,12,14,18,24 (8514 RES)=SYMBOLG.FON
          MS SANS SERIF 8,10,12,14,18,24 (8514 RES)=SSERIFG.FON
          MS SERIF 8,10,12,14,18,24 (8514 RES)=SERIFG.FON
          SMALL FONTS (8514 RES)=SMALLG.FON
          COURIER 10,12,15 (8514 RES)=COURG.FON
       o  Save the changes to the SYSTEM.INI file.

The system is ready to run Windows programs in WIN-OS/2 full-screen sessions high-resolution mode.

Preparing to Switch to a Different Display Adapter 243/3

Because SVGA adapters are only compatible at the VGA level, the system must be restored to VGA in order to safely install a different display adapter. To set your system back to VGA:

  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press V.

Your display adapter is restored and can work in VGA mode. If you want to install a new display adapter or video device driver, complete the steps under Installing a Video Device Driver.

Recovering from an Incorrect Display Type Selection 244/3

If you performed the steps in Installing a Video Device Driver and selected an incorrect display driver you can recover by restoring to VGA mode. To restore to VGA mode:

  1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your
     screen, press Alt+F1.
  3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press V.
  4. Use Selective Install to install support for another high-resolution
     display adapter.  See Installing a Video Device Driver for instructions.

Capturing the Display Configuration 245/3

SVGA display and video mode configuration under OS/2 is controlled by the SVGADATA.PMI file. This file can be provided by the display adapter manufacturer or created using the SVGA utility program. The SVGA utility program gets information from the SVGA chip set to set each video mode and captures the current state of the display adapter. This information is stored in the SVGADATA.PMI file and used when the system is started. Both the SVGA.EXE and SVGADATA.PMI are located in the \OS2 directory. To create the SVGADATA.PMI file, type one of the following commands at a DOS command prompt and press Enter.

SVGA ON           Generates the SVGADATA.PMI file which enables OS/2 SVGA
                  support.
SVGA ON DOS       Generates PMI information when executed outside the OS/2 DOS
                  environment.  This generates an SVGADATA.DOS file that can be
                  renamed to .PMI and copied to the \OS2 directory.  This entry
                  might be required if your SVGA adapter uses DOS device
                  drivers to configure the display. Trident** adapters are an
                  example.
SVGA ON INIT      Generates default display information for some TSENG** and
                  Cirrus Logic** based display adapters.
SVGA OFF          Deletes the SVGADATA.PMI file, disabling OS/2 SVGA support.
SVGA STATUS       Returns your graphics chipset, as it appears to OS/2.
Note:  The SVGA utility program might be affected by video configuration
programs, Terminate Stay Resident programs (TSR), and switches and jumpers on
the display adapter.  Configure your video adapter properly before using the
SVGA utility program to create the SVGADATA.PMI file.

Switching to a Display with Less Capability 246/3

Switching to a lower capability display after installing high-resolution (SVGA) drivers might cause the system to start out of synchronization. Follow this procedure to switch to a display with less capability:

  1. Open DOS Full-Screen command prompt.
  2. Run the DOS display configuration utility program supplied with your SVGA
     adapter to properly configure your display adapter and display.
  3. Change to the \OS2 directory on your hard disk.
  4. Type SVGA ON.
  5. Press Enter to start the SVGA utility program.  This utility program saves
     the current state of your video configuration.
  6. Shut down your system.
  7. Restart your system to enable the new display.

Note: You can also use these instructions if you start a specific version of DOS. Substitute the following step for step 4. Type SVGA ON DOS and press Enter. When the SVGA utility program finishes, type:

RENAME\OS2\SVGADATA.DOS \OS2\SVGADATA.PMI

Press Enter.

XGA Procedures 247/2+

The following information relates to specific situations with high-resolution XGA displays.

XGA-2 Display Type Override 248/3

To correctly operate your display, OS/2 needs to determine the type and characteristics of the device by using a display identification number. Some displays have the same identification number but different characteristics. If OS/2 does not operate your display at the correct refresh rate or display mode, and you are running an XGA-2 adapter, do the following:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.  The System Settings notebook appears.
  4. Select page 2 of the Screen page.  (You can go to page 2 by selecting the
     right arrow in the lower-right corner of the notebook.)
  5. Select the appropriate display type using the list provided.
     Note:  If an incorrect display type is selected, your display might be
     unusable after you restart your system.
  6. Close the Settings notebook.

Recovering from an Incorrect Display Type Selection 249/3

If you performed the steps in XGA-2 Display Type Override and your display is not usable, you can revert back to the previous display type. To erase the display type override information:

1. Turn on the computer.  If the computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart it.
2. When a small white box appears in the upper left-hand corner of your screen, press Alt+F1.
3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.
4. Change to the C:\XGA$DMQS directory and delete the XGASETUP.PRO file.
   This erases all override information from your system.
5. Remove the diskette and restart your system by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del.
   Your display now operates using its default settings.

Note: If you plan to change or replace your display, first delete the file XGASETUP.PRO from the XGA$DMQS directory and then turn off the system. If your new display does not operate correctly, repeat the preceding procedure.

Changing Screen Resolution and Number of Colors 250/3

Note: You cannot use this procedure if you are using the VGA, 8514, or SVGA driver. To change the screen resolution or number of colors:

  1. Open OS/2 System.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open System.
  4. Select the desired resolution and number of colors from the list.
  5. Close the Settings notebook.
  6. Shut down and restart your system to make the new resolution and number of
     colors operational.

Note: The Microsoft Windows XGA full-screen driver does not support all the graphic modes handled by the OS/2 PM XGA driver. The full-screen Windows driver does not support 1024 x 768 x 16 color. If this mode is selected, the OS/2 Desktop will run at 1024 x 768 x 16 color, but the Windows full screen will operate in 1024 x 768 x 256 color mode.

Laptop LCD or Monochrome Plasma Displays 251/2

Laptop LCDs and computers with monochrome plasma displays use 16 shades of gray and operate like VGA displays. Note: If you run VGA DOS graphics programs on the OS/2 Desktop and your system does not have VGA support, your Desktop might be corrupted. You can optimize the color scheme for gray-scale usage, and also provide a good set of colors for a VGA Desktop presentation on a laptop LCD or monochrome plasma display. To change the color scheme and create a more readable display image:

1. Use your Reference Diskette or hardware Setup program to set your hardware
   to VGA color, if possible.
2. Open OS/2 System.
3. Open System Setup.
4. Open Scheme Palette.
5. Select the monochrome scheme in the right-hand column.
6. Close the Scheme Palette.

Part 5 - Advanced Installation 252/1

Using Advanced Installation    253/1+

This chapter provides examples of installing OS/2 on your computer using the Advanced Installation method. Advanced Installation is designed for experienced computer users who want to customize their installation in one or more of the following ways:

  o  Select specific software features of OS/2 to install, rather than the
     preselected group (see Examples 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5)
  o  Install OS/2 on a drive or partition other than C (see Examples 1, 2, and
     3)
  o  Install OS/2 in a logical drive (see Examples 1, 2, and 3)
  o  Install OS/2 on a hard disk other than the first disk in the computer (see
     Example 3)
  o  Select the HPFS file system (see step 21 in Example 1)
  o  Install OS/2 so it can be used with Boot Manager (see Examples 1, 2, and
     3)
  o  Install OS/2 on a computer that does not have DOS and Windows on it (see
     Examples 4 and 5)
  o  Install OS/2 in one primary partition and delete all existing information
     on your hard disk (see Example 5)
If you have any problems during the installation, press the F1 key to view the
online help that is available whenever you see F1=Help at the bottom of a
screen. If you have problems with any of your hardware or if you receive error
messages, refer to Solving Installation Problems.
Planning for a Boot Manager Setup    254/2

During Advanced Installation, you will be asked to specify how you want to partition your hard disk. If you are installing more than one operating system, you will want to consider setting up multiple partitions to contain them. If you set up multiple partitions, you must install the Boot Manager feature. The Boot Manager helps you manage the selective startup of your operating systems. To find out more about partitioning your hard disk and installing Boot Manager, read Setting Up Your Hard Disk. before continuing with the Advanced Installation. For information about partition sizes, see -- Reference dpart not found --..

Installing the Operating System    255/2+

The sections that follow provide examples of typical installation setups.

  o  Example 1 shows how to repartition your hard disk to create a Boot Manager
     partition, a primary partition for DOS and Windows, and a logical drive
     for OS/2.
  o  Example 2 shows how to preserve an existing partition that already
     contains DOS and Windows, and create a Boot Manager partition and a
     logical drive for OS/2 on a hard disk that has available free space.
  o  Example 3 shows an installation on a computer with two hard disks.  In
     this example, a Boot Manager partition and a primary partition for DOS and
     Windows are created on the first hard disk. On the second hard disk, two
     logical drives are created, one to hold data (with drive letter D) and one
     for OS/2 (with drive letter E).
  o  Example 4 and Example 5 show how to install OS/2 on a computer that has no
     other operating systems already installed on it.  The Boot Manager is not
     installed in these installation examples.
     Note:  If you install OS/2 on a computer without Windows, you will not be
     able to use Windows programs.
To make the installation as easy as possible, select the example that most
closely resembles your system and the way you want to customize it.  If you
need more detailed explanations of the Boot Manager, the FDISK utility, the
file systems available in OS/2, or hard disk partitioning, please read Setting
Up Your Hard Disk.
Note:  Be sure you have read As You Begin before installing OS/2.
Example 1    256/3

Creating a Boot Manager Partition, a Primary Partition for DOS and Windows, and a Logical Drive for OS/2 and Data In the following example, a 120MB hard disk that contains one primary partition with DOS and Windows in it will be deleted and replaced with the following partitions:

  o  A 1MB Boot Manager partition
  o  A 20MB primary partition for DOS and Windows (drive C)
  o  A 99MB logical drive for OS/2 and data (drive D)
Use the following steps to set up your hard disk this way. Of course, you can
customize the partition sizes to accommodate the size you want your partitions
to be.  Be aware that this procedure will delete all data currently on your
hard disk.
  1. Back up any data you want to save from the existing partition. (Use your
     existing operating system to back up the data.)
  2. If your computer is on, close all running programs.
  3. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.  If you are installing OS/2
     from a CD, also insert the OS/2 CD into the CD-ROM drive.
  4. Turn your computer on.  If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  5. Remove the Installation Diskette from drive A and insert Diskette 1 Then
     press Enter.  As files are loaded into memory, you will see messages
     asking you to wait, followed by a black screen.
  6. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to highlight Advanced Installation.
     Then press Enter.
  7. When the Installation Drive Selection screen appears, select option 2,
     specify a different drive or partition, and press Enter.
  8. When the Modifying Partitions Warning screen appears, press Enter to
     continue with the installation.
  9. Delete the existing partition (which you have backed up):
       a. At the FDISK screen, press any key to remove the message box.
       b. Highlight the line that contains the partition you want to delete.
       c. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       d. Select Delete partition and press Enter.
       e. Repeat steps a through d for any other partitions you want to delete
 10. Create the Boot Manager partition and install the Boot Manager:
       a. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       b. Select Install Boot Manager and press Enter.
       c. Select Create at Start of Free Space and press Enter.
 11. Create the DOS and Windows primary partition:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Type the size of the primary partition (in this example, 20) and
          press Enter.
       d. Select Primary Partition and press Enter.
       e. Select Create at Start of Free Space and press Enter.
       f. At the FDISK screen, press Enter to display the Options menu.
       g. Select Add to Boot Manager menu and press Enter.
       h. Type a name for this partition (for example, DOS/WIN) and press
          Enter.
 12. Create the logical drive for OS/2 and your data:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Accept the size of the logical drive (in this example, 99) by
          pressing Enter.
          Note:  If you had entered a number smaller than the remaining space
          on your hard disk (in this example, smaller than 99), you would also
          have to indicate if you wanted to create the logical drive at the end
          of free space or at the start of free space.
       d. Select Extended Logical Driveand press Enter.
       e. At the FDISK screen, press Enter to display the Options menu.
       f. Select Add to Boot Manager menu and press Enter.
       g. Type a name for this logical drive (for example, OS2/DATA) and press
          Enter.
 13. Set up OS/2 as the default (the operating system you want preselected at
     startup time):
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the OS2/DATA line (or whatever name
          you have given the logical drive) and press Enter.
       b. Select Set startup values and press Enter.
       c. Select Default and press Enter.  The name you typed for the logical
          drive will appear next to Default.
          Note:  If you want to change any other startup values, you can do so
          after installation or you can use the steps under Setting the Menu
          Display Time now. Then continue with step d.
       d. Press F3.
 14. Exit the FDISK screen:
       a. Press F3.
       b. Press any key to remove the message box.
       c. Select Save and exit and press Enter.
       d. When a message appears confirming that the hard disk partitioning is
          complete, remove Diskette 1from drive A. Do not insert the
          Installation Diskette.  Continue with step 15.
 15. Install DOS and Windows:
       a. Insert the DOS installation diskette into drive A, and then press
          Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart your computer.
       b. Follow the instructions that came with DOS to install it. If prompted
          to do so during the DOS installation, format the partition and
          logical drive you created in the previous steps.
       c. After DOS is installed, the Boot Manager menu appears. Select the DOS
          partition and press Enter.
       d. Install Windows in the primary partition you created for it (in this
          example, it is drive C).  Follow the installation instructions that
          came with Windows.
          Note:   If you receive a message about the Windows swapper file, you
          should avoid putting the swapper file in the same partition or
          logical drive as OS/2.  However, if you put the Windows swapper file
          in the same partition or logical drive as OS/2, make sure you leave
          enough free space for OS/2, and create a temporary Windows swapper
          file.
 16. Continue the OS/2 installation:
       a. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A and press Ctrl+Alt+Del
          to restart your computer.
       b. When the IBM logo screen appears, remove the Installation Diskette
          and insert Diskette 1into drive A.  Then press Enter.
       c. When the Installation Drive Selection screen appears, select option
          2, specify a different drive or partition, and press Enter.
       d. When the warning screen appears, press Enter to continue.
 17. Indicate which partition should be used to install OS/2:
       a. At the FDISK screen, press any key to remove the message box.
       b. Highlight the OS2/DATA line (or whatever name you have given the
          logical drive) and press Enter.
       c. Select Set installable and press Enter.
       d. Press F3 to exit the FDISK screen.
 18. When the Installation Drive Selection screen reappears, select option 1,
     Accept the drive, and press Enter.  (In this example, the screen will show
     drive D as the selected drive.)
 19. When prompted to do so, remove Diskette 1from drive A and insert Diskette
     2.  Then press Enter.  (If you are installing from a CD, you will not see
     any messages to remove and insert diskettes.)
 20. When a screen appears asking if you want to format the OS/2 partition, do
     one of the following:
       o  Select Do not format the partition if you want to use the FAT file
          system.  Then press Enter.  Continue with step 22.
       o  Select Format the partition if you want to use the HPFS file system.
          Then press Enter.  Continue with step 21.
         Refer to Selecting a File System for an explanation of the file
         systems.
 21. When the Select the File System screen appears, select the file system
     with which you want to format the OS/2 logical drive.
 22. Follow the instructions on the screen.  If you are installing from
     diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes as the
     installation progresses.
     After Diskette 6, you will be asked to reinsert the Installation Diskette
     and then reinsert Diskette 1   Follow the instructions on the screen.
     After you remove Diskette 1and press Enter, you will see the OS/2 logo
     screen, followed by the System Configuration screen:
 23. The System Configuration screen shows your country configuration and the
     hardware devices that the Installation program detected on your system.
     Check the choices on the screen to be sure they are correct.
     If any of the hardware listed on the screen is incorrect, use the mouse to
     click on the icon (the small picture) next to the device name.   A screen
     will appear where you can indicate the correct information about your
     hardware device.  If you are unsure about the hardware you are using,
     refer to the documentation that came with it. If you need information
     about which device drivers to select for your primary or secondary
     display, refer to Video Procedures
     Follow the instructions on each screen.   Click on Help if you need more
     information about any screen you see.
     If the information on the System Configuration screen is correct, click on
     OK.
     A special note about Super VGA displays: If your system has a Super VGA
     (SVGA) display, you will see a screen at the end of the Installation
     program where you can configure your computer for the SVGA display.
 24. When the Select System Default Printer window appears, use the arrow keys
     or your mouse to highlight the name of your printer in the list of printer
     names.  Then indicate the port to which your printer is attached:
       o  If your printer is connected to a parallel port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has pins), click on the LPT1, LPT2, or
          LPT3 button.  Then press Enter.
       o  If your printer is connected to a serial port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has holes), click on the COM1, COM2,
          COM3, or COM4 button.  Then press Enter.
         If you do not have a printer attached to your computer, select Do not
         install default printer and press Enter or click on OK. The OS/2 Setup
         and Installation screen appears:
 25. If you want to modify your CONFIG.SYS file, you can do so from the OS/2
     Setup and Installation screen.  Click on Software configuration in the
     menu bar at the top of the screen.  Refer to Modifying the CONFIG.SYS File
     during Installation for more information.
 26. The OS/2 Setup and Installation screen lets you select the software
     features you want to install.  You will notice that some features have a
     check mark next to them, which means they are selected for installation.
     The amount of hard disk space required for each feature is shown to the
     right of the feature.
     Follow these steps:
       a. Click on options you do not want to install to deselect them. By
          deselecting features, you will save hard disk space.
       b. If a More button appears to the right of an option, click on the
          button to see additional items you can select or deselect.
       c. Click on Install when you are done making all your selections.
 27. When the Advanced Options window appears, click on any options you do not
     want to select.  Then click on OK.
 28. Follow the instructions that appear on each screen.  If you are installing
     from diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes,
     including one or more Printer Driver diskettes.  After inserting each
     diskette, click on OK or press Enter.
 29. If you have a Super VGA (SVGA) display, you will see the Monitor
     Configuration/Selection Utility screen.  Follow the instructions on the
     screen; click on Help if you need more information.
 30. When prompted to do so, insert the Display Driver diskettes that are part
     of the OS/2 installation.
 31. When a screen appears asking you to insert your Windows diskettes, do one
     of the following:
       o  If you installed Windows from diskettes, follow these steps:
            a. Remove the OS/2 diskette that is currently in drive A.
            b. Insert the requested Windows diskette and press Enter.
            c. Continue removing and inserting your Windows diskettes as
               requested.
       o  If you installed Windows from a CD, follow these steps:
            a. Remove the OS/2 CD from the CD-ROM drive.
            b. Insert the Windows CD into the CD-ROM drive and press Enter.
            c. When prompted for the location of the Windows files on the CD,
               type the drive letter and directory name in the field provided.
               For example:
               e:\winsetup
               where e: is the letter of the CD-ROM drive, and where \winsetup
               is the directory that contains the Windows files.
 32. When prompted to do so, remove the Windows diskette or CD and press Enter.
 33. When the OS/2 Installation is complete, you will be prompted to shut down
     and restart your computer.  Click on OK or press Enter.
 34. When your computer restarts, the OS/2 Tutorial will appear on your screen.
Please view the tutorial to learn about the features of OS/2 and how to use
your Desktop.  The tutorial also provides information to help you make the
transition from DOS and Windows to OS/2.
Example 2    257/3

Creating a Boot Manager Partition, Keeping an Existing Primary Partition for DOS and Windows (without Repartitioning), and Creating Logical Drives for OS/2 and Data In this example, a hard disk of 120MB currently consists of a primary partition of 40MB (containing DOS and Windows) and a logical drive of 80MB (which might contain data). The DOS/Windows primary partition (drive C) will be preserved, but the logical drive will be deleted and replaced by:

  o  A 1MB Boot Manager partition
  o  A 39MB logical drive for data (drive D)
  o  A 40MB logical drive for OS/2 (drive E)
In this example, you will create free space on your hard disk and then put the
Boot Manager partition at the end of the free space. Of course, you can
customize the partition sizes to accommodate the size you want your partitions
to be.   Be aware that this procedure will delete all data currently on the
drive you are repartitioning.
  1. Back up any data you want to save from the existing logical drive. (Use
     your existing operating system to back up the data.)
  2. If your computer is on, close all running programs.
  3. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.  If you are installing OS/2
     from a CD, also insert the OS/2 CD into the CD-ROM drive.
  4. Turn your computer on.  If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  5. Remove the Installation Diskette from drive A and insert Diskette 1  Then
     press Enter.   As files are loaded into memory, you will see messages
     asking you to wait, followed by a black screen.
  6. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to highlight Advanced Installation.
     Then press Enter.
  7. When the Installation Drive Selection screen appears, select option 2,
     specify a different drive or partition, and press Enter.
  8. When the Modifying Partitions Warning screen appears, press Enter to
     continue with the installation.
  9. Delete the existing logical drive (which you have backed up):
       a. At the FDISK screen, press any key to remove the message box.
       b. Highlight the line that contains information about the logical drive
          you are going to delete.  Then press Enter.
       c. Select Delete partition from the Options menu and press Enter.
 10. Create the Boot Manager partition and install the Boot Manager:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Install Boot Manager and press Enter.
       c. Select Create at End of Free Space and press Enter.
 11. Create the first logical drive (for data):
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Type the size of the extended logical drive (in this example, 39) and
          press Enter.
       d. Select Extended Logical Driveand press Enter.
       e. Select Create at Start of Free Space and press Enter.
 12. Create the second logical drive (for OS/2):
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Accept the size of the extended logical drive (in this example, 40  )
          by pressing Enter.
          Note:  If you had entered a number smaller than the remaining space
          on your hard disk (in this example, smaller than 40), you would also
          have to indicate if you wanted to create the logical drive at the end
          of free space or at the start of free space.
       d. Select Extended Logical Drive and press Enter.
       e. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       f. Select Add to Boot Manager menu and press Enter.
       g. Type a name for this logical drive (for example, OS/2) and press
          Enter.
 13. Set up OS/2 as the default (the operating system you want preselected at
     startup time):
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the OS/2 line (or whatever name you
          have given this logical drive) and press Enter.
       b. Select Set startup values and press Enter.
       c. Select Default and press Enter.  The name you typed for the OS/2
          logical drive will appear next to Default.
          Note:  If you want to change any other startup values, you can do so
          after installation or you can use the steps under Setting the Menu
          Display Time Then continue with step d.
       d. Press F3.
 14. Indicate which partition should be used to install OS/2:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the OS/2 line (or whatever name you
          have given this logical drive) and press Enter.
       b. Select Set installable and press Enter.
 15. Add a name for the DOS/Windows partition to the Boot Manager startup menu:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the line that contains information
          about the DOS/Windows partition.
       b. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       c. Select Add to Boot Manager menu and press Enter.
       d. Type a name for this partition (for example, DOS/WIN) and press
          Enter.
 16. Exit the FDISK screen:
       a. Press F3.
       b. Select Save and Exit and press Enter.
 17. Continue with the installation.  You will be asked to reinsert the
     Installation Diskette and Diskette 1  Follow the messages on the screen.
 18. When the Installation Drive Selection screen reappears, select option 1,
     Accept the drive, and press Enter.  (In this example, the screen will show
     drive E as the selected drive.)
 19. When prompted to do so, remove Diskette 1from drive A and insert Diskette
     2.  Then press Enter.  (If you are installing from a CD, you will not see
     any messages to remove and insert diskettes.)
 20. When the Select the File System screen appears, select the file system you
     want to use for your OS/2 drive.   (Refer to Selecting a File System)
 21. Follow the instructions on the screen.  If you are installing from
     diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes as the
     installation progresses.
     After Diskette 6, you will be asked to reinsert the Installation Diskette
     and then reinsert Diskette 1   Follow the instructions on the screen.
     After you remove Diskette 1and press Enter, you will see the OS/2 logo
     screen, followed by the System Configuration screen.
 22. The System Configuration screen shows your country configuration and the
     hardware devices that the Installation program detected on your system.
     Check the choices on the screen to be sure they are correct.
     If any of the hardware listed on the screen is incorrect, use the mouse to
     click on the icon (the small picture) next to the device name.   A screen
     will appear where you can indicate the correct information about your
     hardware device.  If you are unsure about the hardware you are using,
     refer to the documentation that came with it. If you need information
     about which device drivers to select for your primary or secondary
     display, refer Video Procedures.
     Follow the instructions on each screen.   Click on Help if you need more
     information about any screen you see.
     If the information on the System Configuration screen is correct, click on
     OK.
     A special note about Super VGA displays: If your system has a Super VGA
     (SVGA) display, you will see a screen at the end of the Installation
     program where you can configure your computer for the SVGA display.
 23. When the Select System Default Printer window appears, use the arrow keys
     or your mouse to highlight the name of your printer in the list of printer
     names.  Then indicate the port to which your printer is attached:
       o  If your printer is connected to a parallel port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has pins), click on the LPT1, LPT2, or
          LPT3 button.  Then press Enter.
       o  If your printer is connected to a serial port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has holes), click on the COM1, COM2,
          COM3, or COM4 button.  Then press Enter.
         If you do not have a printer attached to your computer, select Do not
         install default printer and press Enter or click on OK.  The OS/2
         Setup and Installation screen appears.
 24. Click on Options on the menu bar at the top of the screen.
 25. Click on Format on the pull-down menu.  Then indicate which file system
     you want to use to format the logical drive you created to hold your data
     (in this example, the logical drive is drive D). Refer to Selecting a File
     System for an explanation of the file systems.  Click on Format when you
     are done.
 26. When a warning screen appears, click on Format to continue.
 27. If you want to modify your CONFIG.SYS file, you can do so from the OS/2
     Setup and Installation screen.  Click on Software configuration on the
     menu bar at the top of the screen.  Refer to Modifying the CONFIG.SYS File
     during Installation for more information.
 28. The OS/2 Setup and Installation screen lets you select the software
     features you want to install.  You will notice that some features have a
     check mark next to them, which means they are selected for installation.
     The amount of hard disk space required for each feature is shown to the
     right of the feature.
     Follow these steps:
       a. Click on options you do not want to install to deselect them. By
          deselecting features, you will save hard disk space.
       b. If a More button appears to the right of an option, click on the
          button to see additional items you can select or deselect.
       c. Click on Install when you are done making all your selections.
 29. When the Advanced Options window appears, click on any options you do not
     want to select.  Then click on OK.
 30. Follow the instructions that appear on each screen.  If you are installing
     from diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes,
     including one or more Printer Driver diskettes.  After inserting each
     diskette, click on OK or press Enter.
 31. If you have a Super VGA (SVGA) display, you will see the Monitor
     Configuration/Selection Utility screen.  Follow the instructions on the
     screen; click on Help if you need more information.
 32. When prompted to do so, insert the Display Driver diskettes that are part
     of the OS/2 installation.
 33. When the OS/2 Installation is complete, you will be prompted to shut down
     and restart your computer.  Click on OK or press Enter.
 34. When your computer restarts, the OS/2 Tutorial will appear on your screen.
Please view the tutorial to learn about the features of OS/2 and how to use
your Desktop.  The tutorial also provides information to help you make the
transition from DOS and Windows to OS/2.
Example 3    258/3

Creating a Boot Manager Partition and a Primary Partition for DOS and Windows on the First Hard Disk, and Logical Drives for OS/2 and Data on the Second Hard Disk In the following example, a system with two hard disk drives (one 80MB in size with DOS and Windows on it, and the other 200MB in size with programs and data on it) will be reformatted and replaced with the following partitions and logical drives:

  o  The first hard disk:
       -  A 1MB Boot Manager partition
       -  A 79MB primary partition for DOS and Windows (drive C)
  o  The second hard disk:
       -  A 155MB logical drive for programs and data (drive D)
       -  A 45MB logical drive for OS/2 (drive E)
Notice that in this example, because only one primary partition (drive C) is
created on the first hard disk, no drive remapping occurs for your data drive
(drive D). That is, if your data files were previously in drive D on the second
hard disk, they will still be in logical drive D after repartitioning and
installing OS/2.  Of course, you must back up your data files before
repartitioning, and then restore the files to drive D when the OS/2
installation is completed.
You will also notice that when you create only logical drives on your second
hard disk, the FDISK utility program will automatically set up a small (usually
1MB) primary partition at the start of free space.  That is because it must
reserve space for the partition table at the start of the hard disk.  However,
this partition will not be assigned a drive letter, and will not cause drive
remapping or interfere with the use of the logical drives you create on this
disk.
Use the following steps to set up your hard disks this way. Of course, you can
customize the partition sizes to accommodate the size you want your partitions
to be.   Be aware that this procedure will delete all data currently on your
hard disks.
  1. Back up any data you want to save from the existing partitions. (Use your
     existing operating system to back up the data.)  Be sure to back up data
     on both hard disks.
  2. If your computer is on, close all running programs.
  3. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.  If you are installing OS/2
     from a CD, also insert the OS/2 CD into the CD-ROM drive.
  4. Turn your computer on.  If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  5. Remove the Installation Diskette from drive A and insert Diskette 1 Then
     press Enter.  As files are loaded into memory, you will see messages
     asking you to wait, followed by a black screen.  Then a screen appears.
  6. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to highlight Advanced Installation.
     Then press Enter.
  7. When the Installation Drive Selection screen appears, select option 2,
     specify a different drive or partition, and press Enter.
  8. When the Modifying Partitions Warning screen appears, press Enter to
     continue with the installation.
  9. Delete the existing partition on the first hard disk (which you have
     backed up):
       a. At the FDISK screen, press any key to remove the message box.
       b. Highlight the line that contains the partition you want to delete.
       c. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       d. Select Delete partition and press Enter.
       e. Repeat steps a through d for any other partitions you want to delete
          on the first hard disk.
 10. Create the Boot Manager partition and install the Boot Manager:
       a. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       b. Select Install Boot Manager and press Enter.
       c. Select Create at Start of Free Space and press Enter.
 11. Create the primary partition for DOS and Windows:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Accept the size of the partition (in this example, 79) by pressing
          Enter.
          Note:  If you had entered a number smaller than the remaining space
          on your hard disk (in this example, smaller than 79), you would also
          have to indicate if you wanted to create the partition at the end of
          free space or at the start of free space.
       d. Select Primary Partition and press Enter.
       e. At the FDISK screen, press Enter to display the Options menu.
       f. Select Add to Boot Manager menu and press Enter.
       g. Type a name for this primary partition (for example, DOS/WIN) and
          press Enter.
 12. Delete the existing partition on the second hard disk (which you have
     backed up):
       a. At the FDISK screen, press the Tab key to highlight Disk at the top
          of the screen.
       b. Press the Right Arrow key to display the FDISK screen for the second
          hard disk.
       c. Press the Tab key to highlight the first partition listed on the
          FDISK screen.
       d. Highlight the line that contains the partition you want to delete and
          press Enter.
       e. Select Delete partition and press Enter.
       f. Repeat steps a through e for any other partitions you want to delete
          on the second hard disk.
 13. Create the logical drive for OS/2:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Type the size of the logical drive (in this example, 45) and press
          Enter.
       d. Select Extended Logical Drive and press Enter.
       e. Select Create at End of Free Space and press Enter.
       f. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       g. Select Add to Boot Manager menu and press Enter.
       h. Type a name for this logical drive (for example, OS/2) and press
          Enter.
 14. Set up OS/2 as the default (the operating system you want preselected at
     startup time):
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the OS/2 line (or whatever name you
          have given the logical drive for OS/2) and press Enter.
       b. Select Set startup values and press Enter.
       c. Select Default and press Enter.  The name you typed for the OS/2
          logical drive will appear next to Default.
          Note:  If you want to change any other startup values, you can do so
          after installation or you can use the steps under Setting the Menu
          Display Time now. Then continue with step d.
       d. Press F3.
 15. Create the logical drive for data:
       a. At the FDISK screen, highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Accept the size of the logical drive (in this example, 155) by
          pressing Enter.
          Note:  If you had entered a number smaller than the remaining space
          on your hard disk (in this example, smaller than 155), you would also
          have to indicate if you wanted to create the partition at the end of
          free space or at the start of free space.
       d. Select Extended Logical Drive and Press Enter.
 16. Exit the FDISK screen:
       a. Press F3.
       b. Press any key to remove the message box.
       c. Select Save and exit and press Enter.
       d. When a message appears confirming the hard disk partitioning is
          complete, remove Diskette 1from drive A.  Do not insert the
          Installation Diskette.  Continue with step 17.
 17. Install DOS and Windows on the first hard disk:
       a. Insert the DOS installation diskette into drive A, and then press
          Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart your computer.
       b. Follow the instructions that came with DOS to install it.  If
          prompted to do so during the DOS installation, format the partition
          and logical drives you created in the previous steps.
       c. After DOS is installed, the Boot Manager menu appears.  Select the
          DOS partition and press Enter.
       d. Install Windows in the primary partition you created for it (in this
          example, it is drive C).  Follow the installation instructions that
          came with Windows.
          Note:  If you receive a message about the Windows swapper file, you
          should avoid putting the swapper file in the same partition or
          logical drive as OS/2.  However, if you put the Windows swapper file
          in the same partition or logical drive as OS/2, make sure you leave
          enough free space for OS/2, and create a temporary Windows swapper
          file.
 18. Continue the OS/2 installation:
       a. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A and press Ctrl+Alt+Del
          to restart your computer.
       b. When the IBM logo screen appears, remove the Installation Diskette
          and insert Diskette 1into drive A.  Then press Enter.
       c. When the Installation Drive Selection screen appears, select option
          2, specify a different drive or partition, and press Enter.
       d. When the warning screen appears, press Enter to continue.
 19. Indicate which partition should be used to install OS/2:
       a. At the FDISK screen, press any key to remove the message box.
       b. Press the Tab key to highlight Disk at the top of the FDISK screen.
       c. Press the Right Arrow key to display the FDISK screen for the second
          hard disk.
       d. Press the Tab key to highlight the first partition listed on the
          FDISK screen.
       e. Highlight the OS/2 line (or whatever name you have given the OS/2
          logical drive) and press Enter.
       f. Select Set installable and press Enter.
       g. Press F3 to exit the FDISK screen.
 20. When the Installation Drive Selection screen reappears, select option 1,
     Accept the drive, and press Enter.  (In this example, the screen will show
     drive E as the selected drive.)
 21. When prompted to do so, remove Diskette 1from drive A and insert Diskette
     2.  Then press Enter.  (If you are installing from a CD, you will not see
     any messages to remove and insert diskettes.)
 22. When a screen appears asking if you want to format the OS/2 partition, do
     one of the following:
       o  Select Do not format the partition if you want to use the FAT file
          system.  Then press Enter.  Continue with step 24.
       o  Select Format the partition if you want to use the HPFS file system.
          Then press Enter.  Continue with step 23.
         Refer to Selecting a File System for an explanation of the file
         systems.
 23. When the Select the File System screen appears, select the file system
     with which you want to format the OS/2 logical drive. If a warning screen
     appears, press Enter to continue with the installation.
 24. Follow the instructions on the screen.  If you are installing from
     diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes as the
     installation progresses.
 25. After Diskette 6, you will be asked to reinsert the Installation Diskette
     and then reinsert Diskette 1   Follow the instructions on the screen.
     After you remove Diskette 1and press Enter, you will see the OS/2 logo
     screen, followed by the System Configuration screen.
 26. The System Configuration screen shows your country configuration and the
     hardware devices that the Installation program detected on your system.
     Check the choices on the screen to be sure they are correct.
     If any of the hardware listed on the screen is incorrect, use the mouse to
     click on the icon (the small picture) next to the device name.   A screen
     will appear where you can indicate the correct information about your
     hardware device.  If you are unsure about the hardware you are using,
     refer to the documentation that came with it.  If you need information
     about which device drivers to select for your primary or secondary
     display, refer to Video Procedures.
     Follow the instructions on each screen.   Click on Help if you need more
     information about any screen you see.
     If the information on the System Configuration screen is correct, click on
     OK.
     A special note about Super VGA displays: If your system has a Super VGA
     (SVGA) display, you will see a screen at the end of the Installation
     program where you can configure your computer for the SVGA display.
 27. When the Select System Default Printer window appears, use the arrow keys
     or your mouse to highlight the name of your printer in the list of printer
     names.  Then indicate the port to which your printer is attached:
       o  If your printer is connected to a parallel port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has pins), click on the LPT1, LPT2, or
          LPT3 button.  Then press Enter.
       o  If your printer is connected to a serial port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has holes), click on the COM1, COM2,
          COM3, or COM4 button.  Then press Enter.
         If you do not have a printer attached to your computer, select Do not
         install default printer and press Enter or click on OK. The OS/2 Setup
         and Installation screen appears.
 28. Click on Options on the menu bar at the top of the screen.
 29. Click on Format on the pull-down menu.  Then indicate which file system
     you want to use to format the logical drive you created to hold data (in
     this example, the logical drive is drive D).  Refer to Selecting a File
     System for an explanation of the file systems.  Click on Format when you
     are done.
 30. When a warning screen appears, click on Format to continue.
 31. If you want to modify your CONFIG.SYS file, you can do so from the OS/2
     Setup and Installation screen.  Click on Software configuration in the
     menu bar at the top of the screen.  Refer to Modifying the CONFIG.SYS File
     during Installation for more information.
 32. The OS/2 Setup and Installation screen lets you select the software
     features you want to install.  You will notice that some features have a
     check mark next to them, which means they are selected for installation.
     The amount of hard disk space required for each feature is shown to the
     right of the feature.
     Follow these steps:
       a. Click on options you do not want to install to deselect them. By
          deselecting features, you will save hard disk space.
       b. If a More button appears to the right of an option, click on the
          button to see additional items you can select or deselect.
       c. Click on Install when you are done making all your selections.
 33. When the Advanced Options window appears, click on any options you do not
     want to select.  Then click on OK.
 34. Follow the instructions that appear on each screen.  If you are installing
     from diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes,
     including one or more Printer Driver diskettes.  After inserting each
     diskette, click on OK or press Enter.
 35. If you have a Super VGA (SVGA) display, you will see the Monitor
     Configuration/Selection Utility screen.  Follow the instructions on the
     screen; click on Help if you need more information.
 36. When prompted to do so, insert the Display Driver diskettes that are part
     of the OS/2 installation.
 37. When a screen appears asking you to insert your Windows diskettes, do one
     of the following:
       o  If you installed Windows from diskettes, follow these steps:
            a. Remove the OS/2 diskette that is currently in drive A.
            b. Insert the requested Windows diskette and press Enter.
            c. Continue removing and inserting your Windows diskettes as
               requested.
       o  If you installed Windows from a CD, follow these steps:
            a. Remove the OS/2 CD from the CD-ROM drive.
            b. Insert the Windows CD into the CD-ROM drive and press Enter.
            c. When prompted for the location of the Windows files on the CD,
               type the drive letter and directory name in the field provided.
               For example:
               e:\winsetup
               where e: is the letter of the CD-ROM drive, and where \winsetup
               is the directory that contains the Windows files.
            d. When prompted to do so, remove the Windows diskette or CD and
               press Enter.
            e. When the OS/2 Installation is complete, you will be prompted to
               shut down and restart your computer.  Click on OK or press
               Enter.
            f. When your computer restarts, the OS/2 Tutorial will appear on
               your screen.
Please view the tutorial to learn about the features of OS/2 and how to use
your Desktop.  The tutorial also provides information to help you make the
transition from DOS and Windows to OS/2.
Example 4    259/3

Creating a Primary Partition for OS/2 and a Logical Drive for Data The following example shows how to set up your hard disk to install OS/2 in one partition and your data in another partition. It does not involve the installation of the Boot Manager. You can use this setup if you are installing on a computer that does not have DOS, Windows, or any other operating systems on it, or if you want to replace all existing operating systems with OS/2. In this example, an 80MB hard disk is replaced by:

  o  A 45MB primary partition in which OS/2 will be installed (drive C)
  o  A 35MB logical drive, which will be used to hold programs and data (drive
     D)
Use the following steps to set up your hard disk this way. Of course, you can
customize the partition sizes to accommodate the size you want your partitions
to be.   Be aware that this procedure will delete all data currently on your
hard disk.
  1. Back up any data you want to save from the existing partition. (Use your
     existing operating system to back up the data.)
  2. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.  If you are installing OS/2
     from a CD, also insert the OS/2 CD into the CD-ROM drive.
  3. Turn your computer on.  If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  4. Remove the Installation Diskette from drive A and insert Diskette 1 Then
     press Enter.   As files are loaded into memory, you will see messages
     asking you to wait, followed by a black screen.
  5. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to highlight Advanced Installation.
     Then press Enter.
  6. When the Installation Drive Selection screen appears, select option 2,
     specify a different drive or partition, and press Enter.
  7. When the Modifying Partitions Warning screen appears, press Enter to
     continue with the installation.
  8. Delete the existing partition (which you have backed up):
       a. At the FDISK screen, press any key to remove the message box.
       b. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       c. Select Delete partition and press Enter.
  9. Create the primary partition for OS/2:
       a. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       b. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Type the size of the primary partition (in this example, 45) and
          press Enter.
       d. Select Primary Partition and press Enter.
       e. Select Create at Start of Free Space and press Enter.
 10. Indicate that this partition should be used to install OS/2:
       a. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       b. Select Set installable and press Enter.
       c. Type a name for the partition (for example, OS/2), and press Enter.
 11. Create the logical drive for your data:
       a. Highlight the Free Space line.
       b. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       c. Select Create partition and press Enter.
       d. Accept the size of the extended logical drive (in this example, 35  )
          by pressing Enter.
          Note:  If you had entered a number smaller than the remaining space
          on your hard disk (in this example, smaller than 35), you would also
          have to indicate if you wanted to create the logical drive at the end
          of free space or at the start of free space.
       e. Select Extended Logical Drive and press Enter.
 12. Exit the FDISK screen:
       a. Press F3.
       b. Select Save and Exit and press Enter.
 13. Follow the instructions on the screen to remove and insert diskettes.
 14. When the Welcome screen reappears, select Advanced Installation and press
     Enter.
 15. When the Installation Drive Selection screen reappears, select option 1,
     Accept the drive, and press Enter.  (In this example, the screen will show
     drive C as the selected drive.)
 16. When prompted to do so, remove Diskette 1from drive A and insert Diskette
     2.  Then press Enter.  (If you are installing from a CD, you will not see
     any messages to remove and insert diskettes.)
 17. When the Select the File System screen appears, select the file system you
     want to use for your OS/2 partition.  (Refer to Selecting a File System.)
 18. When prompted to do so, remove and insert diskettes. After Diskette 6, you
     will be asked to reinsert the Installation Diskette and then reinsert
     Diskette 1 Follow the instructions on the screen.  After you remove
     Diskette 1and press Enter, you will see the OS/2 logo screen, followed by
     the System Configuration screen.
 19. The System Configuration screen shows your country configuration and the
     hardware devices that the Installation program detected on your system.
     Check the choices on the screen to be sure they are correct.
     If any of the hardware listed on the screen is incorrect, use the mouse to
     click on the icon (the small picture) next to the device name.   A screen
     will appear where you can indicate the correct information about your
     hardware device.  If you are unsure about the hardware you are using,
     refer to the documentation that came with it.  If you need information
     about which device drivers to select for your primary or secondary
     display, refer to Video Procedures.
     Follow the instructions on each screen.   Click on Help if you need more
     information about any screen you see.
     If the information on the System Configuration screen is correct, click on
     OK.
     A special note about Super VGA displays: If your system has a Super VGA
     (SVGA) display, you will see a screen at the end of the Installation
     program where you can configure your computer for the SVGA display.
 20. When the Select System Default Printer window appears, use the arrow keys
     or your mouse to highlight the name of your printer in the list of printer
     names.  Then indicate the port to which your printer is attached:
       o  If your printer is connected to a parallel port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has pins), click on the LPT1, LPT2, or
          LPT3 button.  Then press Enter.
       o  If your printer is connected to a serial port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has holes), click on the COM1, COM2,
          COM3, or COM4 button.  Then press Enter.
         If you do not have a printer attached to your computer, select Do not
         install default printer and press Enter or click on OK. The OS/2 Setup
         and Installation screen appears.
 21. Click on Options on the menu bar at the top of the screen.
 22. Click on Format on the pull-down menu.  Then indicate which file system
     you want to use to format the logical drive you created to hold data (in
     this example, the logical drive is drive D). Refer to Selecting a File
     System for an explanation of the file systems.  Click on Format when you
     are done.
 23. When a warning screen appears, click on Format to continue.
 24. If you want to modify your CONFIG.SYS file, you can do so from the OS/2
     Setup and Installation screen.  Click on Software configuration on the
     menu bar at the top of the screen. Refer to Modifying the CONFIG.SYS File
     during Installation for more information.
 25. The OS/2 Setup and Installation screen lets you select the software
     features you want to install.  You will notice that some features have a
     check mark next to them, which means they are selected for installation.
     The amount of hard disk space required for each feature is shown to the
     right of the feature.
     Follow these steps:
       a. Click on options you do not want to install to deselect them. By
          deselecting features, you will save hard disk space.
       b. If a More button appears to the right of an option, click on the
          button to see additional items you can select or deselect.
       c. Click on Install when you are done making all your selections.
 26. When the Advanced Options window appears, click on any options you do not
     want to select.  Then click on OK.
 27. Follow the instructions that appear on each screen.  If you are installing
     from diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes,
     including one or more Printer Driver diskettes.  After inserting each
     diskette, click on OK or press Enter.
 28. If you have a Super VGA (SVGA) display, you will see the Monitor
     Configuration/Selection Utility screen.  Follow the instructions on the
     screen; click on Help if you need more information.
 29. When prompted to do so, insert the Display Driver diskettes that are part
     of the OS/2 installation.
 30. When the OS/2 Installation is complete, you will be prompted to shut down
     and restart your computer.  Click on OK or press Enter.
 31. When your computer restarts, the OS/2 Tutorial will appear on your screen.
Please view the tutorial to learn about the features of OS/2 and how to use
your Desktop.  The tutorial also provides information to help you make the
transition from DOS and Windows to OS/2.
Example 5    260/3

Creating One Primary Partition for OS/2 The following example shows how to set up your hard disk to install OS/2 in one primary partition (drive C). It does not involve the installation of the Boot Manager. You can use this setup if you want to reformat your existing hard disk and replace all the information on the disk with OS/2. You can also use this example if you want to reformat your hard disk with a different file system (for example, you now want to use the FAT file system on a computer that was previously formatted with the HPFS file system). In this example, an 80MB hard disk is replaced by:

  o  An 80MB primary partition in which OS/2 will be installed (drive C)
Use the following steps to set up your hard disk this way. Of course, the size
of your hard disk may be different from the size of the disk used in this
example.  Be aware that this procedure will delete all data currently on your
hard disk.
  1. Back up any data you want to save from the existing partition. (Use your
     existing operating system to back up the data.)
  2. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A. If you are installing OS/2
     from a CD, also insert the OS/2 CD into the CD-ROM drive.
  3. Turn your computer on.  If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  4. Remove the Installation Diskette from drive A and insert Diskette 1 Then
     press Enter.   As files are loaded into memory, you will see messages
     asking you to wait, followed by a black screen.
  5. Use the arrow keys on your keyboard to highlight Advanced Installation.
     Then press Enter.
  6. When the Installation Drive Selection screen appears, select option 2,
     specify a different drive or partition, and press Enter.
  7. When the Modifying Partitions Warning screen appears, press Enter to
     continue with the installation.
  8. Delete existing partitions (which you have backed up):
       a. At the FDISK screen, press any key to remove the message box.
       b. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       c. Select Delete partition and press Enter.
       d. Repeat steps a through c for all partitions you want to delete.
  9. Create the primary partition for OS/2:
       a. Highlight the Free Space line and press Enter.
       b. From the Options menu, select Create partition and press Enter.
       c. Accept the size of the partition (in this example, 80) by pressing
          Enter.
       d. Select Primary Partition and press Enter.
 10. Indicate that this partition should be used to install OS/2:
       a. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
       b. Select Set installable and press Enter.
       c. Type a name for the partition (for example, OS/2), and press Enter.
 11. Exit the FDISK screen:
       a. Press F3.
       b. Select Save and Exit and press Enter.
 12. Follow the instructions on the screen to remove and insert diskettes.
 13. When the Welcome screen reappears, select Advanced Installation and press
     Enter.
 14. When the Installation Drive Selection screen reappears, select option 1,
     Accept the drive, and press Enter.  (In this example, the screen will show
     drive C as the selected drive.)
 15. When prompted to do so, remove Diskette 1from drive A and insert Diskette
     2.  Then press Enter.  (If you are installing from a CD, you will not see
     any messages to remove and insert diskettes.)
 16. When the Select the File System screen appears, select the file system you
     want to use for your OS/2 partition. (Refer to Selecting a File System.)
 17. When prompted to do so, remove and insert diskettes. After Diskette 6, you
     will be asked to reinsert the Installation Diskette and then reinsert
     Diskette 1 Follow the instructions on the screen.  After you remove
     Diskette 1and press Enter, you will see the OS/2 logo screen, followed by
     the System Configuration screen.
 18. The System Configuration screen shows your country configuration and the
     hardware devices that the Installation program detected on your system.
     Check the choices on the screen to be sure they are correct.
     If any of the hardware listed on the screen is incorrect, use the mouse to
     click on the icon (the small picture) next to the device name.   A screen
     will appear where you can indicate the correct information about your
     hardware device.  If you are unsure about the hardware you are using,
     refer to the documentation that came with it.  If you need information
     about which device drivers to select for your primary or secondary
     display, refer to Video Procedures.
     Follow the instructions on each screen.   Click on Help if you need more
     information about any screen you see.
     If the information on the System Configuration screen is correct, click on
     OK.
     A special note about Super VGA displays: If your system has a Super VGA
     (SVGA) display, you will see a screen at the end of the Installation
     program where you can configure your computer for the SVGA display.
 19. When the Select System Default Printer window appears, use the arrow keys
     or your mouse to highlight the name of your printer in the list of printer
     names.  Then indicate the port to which your printer is attached:
       o  If your printer is connected to a parallel port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has pins), click on the LPT1, LPT2, or
          LPT3 button.  Then press Enter.
       o  If your printer is connected to a serial port (the connector on the
          PC end of the printer cable has holes), click on the COM1, COM2,
          COM3, or COM4 button.  Then press Enter.
         If you do not have a printer attached to your computer, select Do not
         install default printer and press Enter or click on OK. The OS/2 Setup
         and Installation screen appears.
 20. If you want to modify your CONFIG.SYS file, you can do so from the OS/2
     Setup and Installation screen.  Click on Software configuration on the
     menu bar at the top of the screen.  Refer to Modifying the CONFIG.SYS File
     during Installation for more information.
 21. The OS/2 Setup and Installation screen lets you select the software
     features you want to install.  You will notice that some features have a
     check mark next to them, which means they are selected for installation.
     The amount of hard disk space required for each feature is shown to the
     right of the feature. Follow these steps:
       a. Click on options you do not want to install to deselect them. By
          deselecting features, you will save hard disk space.
       b. If a More button appears to the right of an option, click on the
          button to see additional items you can select or deselect.
       c. Click on Install when you are done making all your selections.
 22. When the Advanced Options window appears, click on any options you do not
     want to select.  Then click on OK.
 23. Follow the instructions that appear on each screen.  If you are installing
     from diskettes, you will be asked to remove and insert diskettes,
     including one or more Printer Driver diskettes.  After inserting each
     diskette, click on OK or press Enter.
 24. If you have a Super VGA (SVGA) display, you will see the Monitor
     Configuration/Selection Utility screen.  Follow the instructions on the
     screen; click on Help if you need more information.
 25. When prompted to do so, insert the Display Driver diskettes that are part
     of the OS/2 installation.
 26. When the OS/2 Installation is complete, you will be prompted to shut down
     and restart your computer.  Click on OK or press Enter.
 27. When your computer restarts, the OS/2 Tutorial will appear on your screen.
Please view the tutorial to learn about the features of OS/2 and how to use
your Desktop.  The tutorial also provides information to help you make the
transition from DOS and Windows to OS/2.
Configuring Your Boot Manager Menu    261/2+

After installing OS/2 (and the Boot Manager), you can go back and make changes to the Boot Manager menu, such as how long the menu should be displayed and how information on the menu should appear. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. Open OS/2 System on your Desktop.
  2. Open Drive.
  3. Press mouse button 2 to display a pop-up menu.
  4. Select Create partition.
  5. At the Fixed Disk Utility screen, make any changes you want to the
     setting.  Select Help if you need more information.
Setting the Menu Display Time    262/3

To indicate how long you want the Boot Manager startup menu displayed when you start your system, follow these steps:

  1. From the Startup Values menu, you can do one of the following:
       o  If you want the menu displayed for a certain period of time before
          the default operating system starts, accept the value of Yes.
       o  If you want the menu to be displayed indefinitely (until you
          explicitly select a choice from the menu), highlight Timer and press
          Enter to change the value to No.
  2. If you accepted the value of Yes, indicate how long you want the menu
     displayed before the default operating system is started. You can do one
     of the following:
       o  Accept the value listed next to Timeout.
       o  Change the value as follows:
            a. Select Timeout and press Enter.
            b. Type the amount of time (in seconds) that you want the menu
               displayed before the preselected operating system is
               automatically started.
            c. Press Enter.
Setting the Menu Mode    263/3

You can select either Normal or Advanced for the Boot Manager menu mode. If you select Advanced, your Boot Manager menu will include additional information about your partitions. To change the mode that is currently displayed, follow these steps:

  1. Highlight Mode on the Startup Values menu.
  2. Press Enter.
When you have finished configuring your Boot Manager menu, press F3.
Bypassing the Boot Manager Menu    264/2

After the Boot Manager is installed, you can use the SETBOOT command if you want to restart your computer to a specified drive without going through the Boot Manager menu. The SETBOOT command immediately restarts the system. The parameter for SETBOOT is /IBD:drive, where drive is the letter of a startable partition. For example, from the OS/2 command prompt, you can type: setboot /ibd:e to restart your system and start the operating system using drive E, without displaying the Boot Manager menu. See the Command Reference for more information about the SETBOOT command. (The Command Reference is located in the Information folder on your OS/2 Desktop.)

What to Do if You Have Problems during Installation    265/2

The installation of OS/2 is generally a straightforward process and, in most cases, you will not encounter any problems. However, if you do have problems either during the installation process or immediately afterwards, refer to Solving Installation Problems. Problems you might encounter include:

  o  A blank screen after installation.
  o  An error message with a number and, sometimes, text.
  o  A hardware device that does not work.  (This problem can occur if you are
     using hardware that is not supported by OS/2.)
Using a Response File to Install OS/2    266/2+

This section describes how to use a response file to install OS/2. It is intended primarily for people who will be setting up workstations for others to use.

Understanding Response File Installation    267/3

If you have installed previous versions of OS/2 or other operating systems, you are familiar with installation procedures that require you to insert and remove a series of diskettes and answer screen prompts. When you use a response file to install, it is not necessary to answer any screen prompts. All the answers are in a response file that you place on installation Diskette 1 The Installation program reads the file from Diskette 1instead of prompting you for the installation information.

Adding the Sample Response File to Your System    268/3+

A sample response file is included on the OS/2 installation diskettes. When you install the operating system, this response file (called SAMPLE.RSP) is placed in the OS2\INSTALL directory. The SAMPLE.RSP file and other files needed for a response file installation are not automatically installed on your system if you installed OS/2 using the Easy Installation method. You must add these files to your system in order to use them. Follow these steps:

  1. Open OS/2 System on your Desktop.
  2. Open System Setup.
  3. Open Selective Install.  The Software Configuration screen appears.
  4. Select Optional System Utilities.
  5. Select the More push button to the right of Optional System Utilities.  A
     window appears with a list of utilities.
  6. Place a check mark next to Installation Utilities; then select Install.
  7. When prompted to do so, insert the requested installation diskettes.
     Select OK when you are done.
Modifying the Sample Response File    269/4

After you install the SAMPLE.RSP file on your own system, you can modify the SAMPLE.RSP file and use it to install OS/2 on another workstation. Use an editor (such as the System Editor) to modify the sample response file. The following is an excerpt from the sample response file:

  • AlternateAdapter
  • Specifies secondary adapter for two display systems.
  • This should be a lower or equal resolution display since
  • the highest resolution display will be primary for PM.
  • Valid Parms
  • 0=None (DEFAULT)
  • 1=Other than following (DDINSTAL will handle)
  • 2=Monochrome /Printer Adapter
  • 3=Color Graphics Adapter
  • 4=Enhanced Graphics Adapter
  • 5=PS/2 Display Adapter
  • 6=Video Graphics Adapter
  • 7=8514/A Adapter
  • 8=XGA Adapter
  • 9=SVGA Adapter

AlternateAdapter=0

Copying the Response File to Diskette 1    270/3

Use the following steps to make changes to the sample response file. After making the changes, you will copy the file to a copy of Diskette 1. You must also make some modifications to the copy of Diskette 1to make room on it for the response file.

  1. Install OS/2 on a computer.
  2. Open OS/2 System on your Desktop.
  3. Open Command Prompts.
  4. Open OS/2 Window.
  5. Insert Diskette 1into drive A.
  6. Type diskcopy a: a: and press Enter.
  7. When prompted to do so, remove Diskette 1from drive A and insert a blank,
     formatted diskette.  (This diskette will be used to make a copy of
     Diskette 1)
  8. Make sure the copy of Diskette 1is in drive A.  Then type del a:\mouse.sys
     and press Enter.
  9. Type del a:\sysinst2.exe and press Enter.
 10. If you are installing from a CD, this step is not necessary; go to step
     10.  If you are installing from diskettes, type del a:\bundle and press
     Enter.
 11. To edit the CONFIG.SYS file on the copy of Diskette 1 type e a:\config.sys
     and press Enter.
 12. Change the following statement from:
     SET OS2_SHELL=SYSINST2.EXE to the following:
     SET OS2_SHELL=RSPINST.EXE A:\OS2SE30.RS                                 P
 13. Delete the following statement from the CONFIG.SYS file:
     DEVICE=MOUSE.SYS
 14. Save and close the CONFIG.SYS file. At the prompt, type the following and
     press Enter after each command:
     CD\OS2\INSTALL
     COPY SAMPLE.RSP OS2SE30.RSP
 15. Use an editor (such as the System Editor) to make your changes to the
     response file so you can use it for installing OS/2. Then save and close
     the file.
 16. At the prompt, type the following and press Enter after each command:
     COPY OS2SE30.RSP A:
     COPY C:\RSPINST.EXE A:\
 17. Remove the copy of Diskette 1from drive A.
 18. If you have a non-Micro Channel computer, go to step 20. f you have a
     Micro Channel computer and the Reference Diskette contains ABIOS.SYS and
     *.BIO files, you will also need to modify the Installation Diskette that
     came with OS/2.  Follow these steps:
       a. Insert the Installation Diskette into drive A.
       b. Type diskcopy a: a: and press Enter.
       c. When prompted to do so, remove the Installation Diskette from drive A
          and insert a blank, formatted diskette.  Then press Enter. This makes
          a copy of the Installation Diskette, which you will use in the next
          step.
       d. Make sure the copy you just made of the Installation Diskette is in
          drive A.  Type the following and press Enter after each command:
          DEL A:\*.BIO
          DEL A:\ABIOS.SYS
       e. Remove the copy of the Installation Diskette from drive A and insert
          the Reference Diskette.
       f. Type the following and press Enter after each command:
          COPY A:\*.BIO C:\
          COPY A:\ABIOS.SYS C:\
       g. Remove the Reference Diskette from drive A and insert the copy of the
          Installation Diskette.  Type the following and press Enter after each
          command:
          COPY C:\*.BIO A:\
          COPY C:\ABIOS.SYS A:\
          Note:  This Installation Diskette copy is now system-specific. You
          will need to create a modified Installation Diskette for each type of
          system on which you are installing OS/2.
       h. Use this copy of the Installation Diskette during the installation
          process.
 19. When prompted for Diskette 1during the installation, insert the modified
     copy you made of Diskette 1and press Enter.
     From this point on, the Installation program will prompt only for the
     insertion of diskettes.  No other installation actions are necessary.
 20. When prompted to insert Diskette 1again, insert the original Diskette
     1into drive A.
Response files can be used to install the same set of options on multiple
workstations.  However, be sure that the workstations are set up with the same
set of options and hardware.
Installing OS/2 from a Local Area Network Source    271/2

You can use a response file to direct the installation from a source other than a diskette in drive A. For example, in a local area network (LAN), you could direct the installation to a drive on the server. This type of installation requires additional software (such as a LAN support product). Be aware of the following requirements for remote installation of OS/2:

  o  The RAM requirements vary from 6MB to 10MB or more, depending on the
     installation variables.
       -  Redirected remote installation requires more RAM than disk
          installation because the SWAPPER.DAT file is not active.
       -  If you are doing a redirected remote installation without CID
          (configuration, installation, and distribution), you need only about
          6MB of RAM.
       -  If you are using CID, the RAM requirements usually range from 6MB to
          8MB.
       -  If you are using a process on top of CID, such as NVDM/2, 8MB to 10MB
          (or more) might be required.  The main variable with CID is the size
          of the REXX procedure and which dynamic link libraries it pulls in.
          With remote installation, the LAN connection utility programs are the
          main variables.  The version of OS/2 that you are installing is
          another variable.
  o  During remote installation, the SWAPPER.DAT file is not active because the
     disk partition containing the active swapper file cannot be formatted
     during installation.  The SWAPPER.DAT file can be made active, but the
     disk partition has to be a local partition and it has to be preformatted.
     To activate the SWAPPER.DAT file, you must edit the CONFIG.SYS file. To do
     this, replace the existing MEMMAN=NOSWAP statement with the following:
     MEMMAN=SWAP,PROTECT
     SWAPPATH=D:\ 2048 4096
  o  Personal computers might require more RAM because the network drivers
     might have to store more data in the RAM buffers until the processor is
     able to handle the data.
For more information, refer to the following IBM publications:
     OS/2 Version 2.1 Remote Installation and Maintenance
      (GG24-3780)
     NTS/2 Redirected Installation and Configuration Guide (S96F-8488)
     NTS/2 LAN Adapter and Protocol Support Configuration Guide (S96F-8489)
     Automated Installation for CID-Enabled OS/2 2.x (GG24-3783)
     Automated Installation for CID-Enabled Extended Services, LAN Server V3.0
     and Network Transport Services/2 (GG24-3781)
Setting Up Your Hard Disk    272/1+

This chapter provides a detailed explanation of the Boot Manager feature available in OS/2, as well as information about hard disk partitioning and the FDISK utility program. This chapter will help you plan the setup of your hard disk before you begin installing OS/2. In addition, this chapter provides detailed descriptions of some of the installation tasks that are outlined in Using Advanced Installation. If you want more information about an Advanced Installation task as you are installing, refer to the descriptions in this chapter.

What Is the Boot Manager?    273/2

When you install multiple operating systems on your computer, you can use the Boot Manager feature to manage the selective startup of those systems. The Boot Manager startup menu lets you select which operating system you want to be active each time you start your system. The following is an example of what the Boot Manager startup menu would look like if you installed the Boot Manager and three operating systems. This menu would be displayed each time you started your computer, so that you could select which operating system should start. You use the FDISK utility program during the installation of OS/2 to install the Boot Manager feature. FDISK is a program supplied with OS/2 that can be used to manage such tasks as creating and deleting the partitions on your hard disk. Partitions are divisions you create on your hard disk to use as separate storage areas. The following is a brief list of the steps you follow to set up your hard disk for multiple operating systems.

  o  You install the Boot Manager in its own partition (usually 1MB in size).
  o  You then create partitions for any operating systems (including OS/2) you
     are going to install.
  o  Next, you install the other operating systems in the partitions
      you created for them.
     (If you want OS/2 to work with DOS and Windows, you must install DOS and
     Windows first.  Otherwise, most operating systems can be installed after
     installing OS/2.)
  o  Finally, you install the OS/2 operating system.
Hard Disk Partitioning    274/2+

A hard disk can be partitioned in several different ways. For example, your hard disk can have one partition that takes up the entire hard disk. However, if you are going to install multiple operating systems on your hard disk (and install the Boot Manager feature), you must separate the hard disk into multiple partitions. During the Advanced installation, you will be asked how you want your partitions set up. The default choice is to set up one partition (if you are installing on a hard disk with no data) or to preserve the setup of an existing hard disk. If you choose to specify your own partition, the FDISK screen is displayed. From the FDISK screen, you specify the number and type of partitions that you want created. Your hard disk can be separated into a maximum of four primary partitions. You can create primary partitions, which are typically used for operating systems. Note: If a partition is going to contain an operating system, the partition must be within the first 1024 cylinders. You can also create logical drives in an area of the hard disk that is outside the primary partitions. This area is known as the extended partition. The logical drives within the extended partition are typically used to hold programs and data. You can have four primary partitions or three primary partitions and one extended partition. If you are going to install multiple operating systems on your hard disk, you must create one primary partition to contain the programs that manage the startup of multiple operating systems. (This partition is referred to as the Boot Manager partition.) After the Boot Manager partition is created, you can create up to three additional primary partitions (to hold three operating systems). An important aspect of primary partitions is the fact that, at any moment in time, only one of the primary partitions is active. When a given primary partition is active, any other primary partitions on the same physical disk cannot be accessed. Therefore, the operating system in one primary partition cannot access the data in another primary partition on the same physical disk. Another way of subdividing your hard disk is to create logical drives within an extended partition. Logical drives are typically used to hold programs and data.

However, you can also install OS/2  in a logical drive.

The extended partition takes the place of one of the primary partitions on your hard disk. In other words, if you create logical drives within an extended partition, your hard disk can contain only three primary partitions. If two logical drives have been set aside for data. That data can be shared by all the operating systems (provided the file system formats of the logical drives are compatible with the operating systems). All of the logical drives exist within one partition-the extended partition. You don't explicitly create the extended partition. The extended partition is created the first time you create a logical (non-primary) drive. One of the differences between a logical drive and a primary partition is that each logical drive is assigned a unique drive letter. However, all primary partitions on a hard disk share the same drive letter. (On the first hard disk in your system, the primary partitions share drive C). This means that only one primary partition on a hard disk can be accessed at one time. (Note that the Boot Manager partition is different from other primary partitions because it is never assigned a drive letter.) If you want OS/2 to be able to access the data in the partition of another operating system (for example, the DOS partition), install OS/2 in a logical drive. Notice the drive letter assignments in this illustration. The operating system that is active when you start the system performs a process known as drive mapping, in which partitions and logical drives are assigned drive letters. All the primary partitions are mapped first and all logical drives within extended partitions are assigned subsequent drive letters (up through Z). Important: Only one primary partition per hard disk can be active at a time. So, only one primary partition is actually assigned the letter C at any one time. The other primary partitions are not mapped. An operating system maps only those drives with a format type that it supports. For example, DOS does not support the installable file system (IFS) format. (The High Performance File System is an example of an IFS format.) Therefore, any partition or logical drive that is formatted with IFS is not mapped by DOS and is not assigned a drive letter. In the following figure, DOS is active in a primary partition. (The other primary partitions are not mapped.) Drive D is formatted for the File Allocation Table (FAT) file system, which DOS recognizes. However, the next drive is formatted with a file system that DOS does not recognize. Therefore, DOS ignores this drive. Some versions of DOS (such as DOS Version 5.0) will recognize the last partition on the hard disk (in this example) and assign it the letter E. In other versions of DOS, no drives beyond the HPFS drive are recognized. Therefore, no data in those partitions can be used by DOS. Because of the problems that can result when drives are remapped, you should avoid deleting logical drives that exist in the middle of your hard disk. For example, if you were to delete a logical drive from the middle of your disk, the subsequent drives would be remapped. (Drive F would become drive E, and so on.) Problems would result if any programs refer to the former drive letter. The important thing to remember when you are setting up your system is that only one primary partition can be accessible (active) on each hard disk at any system startup. On the other hand, all the logical drives within the extended partition are accessible (provided their file system formats are compatible with the starting operating system). For example, suppose you had DOS 5.0 in one primary partition and OS/2 in another primary partition. One of your logical drives is formatted for FAT and contains a variety of DOS programs. You could start the DOS programs from either of the primary partitions. It is also important to understand what happens to the drive mapping if you add a hard disk after you install OS/2. The logical drives on your existing hard disk will be remapped if your second hard disk has a primary partition on it. Now, assume that you add a second hard disk to your system. The primary partition of that second hard disk will be assigned D. The logical drives of your first hard disk will be remapped. The existing logical drive D becomes E, E becomes F, and so forth. Because OS/2 is now in the logical drive assigned as E, all references to the drive letter (for example, statements in your CONFIG.SYS and INI files) will have to change. For this reason, it is strongly recommended that you place only logical drives on the hard disk that you are adding.

Planning for a Boot Manager Setup    275/3

When you are planning your Boot Manager setup, be aware of the following:

  o  Use primary partitions for DOS systems or versions of the OS/2 operating
     system prior to 2.0.
  o  To prevent the loss of usable disk space, create all primary partitions
     contiguously, at the beginning or end of the disk free space area.
  o  Put all installable file systems (such as the High Performance File
     System) at the end of the disk configuration.
  o  Be aware of specific operating-system restrictions on the hard disk . For
     example, to run properly, DOS 3.3 must be installed in a primary partition
     that is within the first 32MB of the hard disk.
  o  If you are installing a primary partition for DOS and you intend to load
     that version of DOS into a DOS session of OS/2, you will need to change
     the DOS CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files. (You do this after you finish
     installing the operating systems.) Refer to specific DOS version in the
     starting topic of the Master Help Index.  (The Master Help Index is
     displayed on your screen after the OS/2 operating system is installed.)
  o  You can install both DOS and a version of the OS/2 operating system in the
     same primary partition if you want to use the Dual Boot feature within
     your Boot Manager setup. However, if DOS and OS/2 1.3 are in the primary
     partition, you will have to copy the BOOT.COM file from the OS/2 partition
     to the primary partition after you install OS/2.
  o  If you are using the IBM DOS 5.00 Upgrade to update your DOS 3.3 or DOS
     4.0 system, you should be aware that some versions of the upgrade will not
     recognize the DOS partition unless it is the only partition on the hard
     disk.  You might have to do the following:
       1. Make sure that the DOS partition is the only primary partition on
          your hard disk.
       2. Install the DOS 5.00 Upgrade.
       3. Add the Boot Manager partition and install OS/2.
  o  If you have a system with a VESA SUPER I/O controller and two disk drives,
     the system will not start DOS from the Boot Manager menu.  Instead, it
     will display a non-system disk or disk error message.  For more
     information on this message, check the VESA controller documentation or
     contact the manufacturer.
The FDISK Utility Program    276/2+

When you install OS/2 with the Advanced Installation method, yo u use the FDISK utility program to install the Boot Manager feature and to set up the partitions on your hard disk. During Advanced Installation, the FDISK screen appears so that you can see how the partitions are currently set up on your system.

The Options Menu    277/3

When you press the Enter key from the FDISK screen, the Options menu appears. The following list describes each of the choices on the Options menu. Some of the choices are available only under certain conditions. (They appear in black on the menu.) If you try to select an unavailable choice, the system will respond with a warning beep.

Install Boot Manager This choice is used only once--when you create the
partition for the Boot Manager.  It is unavailable thereafter.
Create partition This choice is used to create primary partitions and logical
drives within the extended partition.  You can use this choice whenever free
space is available on the hard disk.
Add to Boot Manager menu This choice is used to add the name of a partition or
logical drive to the Boot Manager startup menu.  You should use this choice for
any operating system that you want to be able to select when you start the
system.  When you select this choice, the New Name window is displayed. You use
the New Name window to assign a meaningful name to the partition or logical
drive.
Change partition name This choice is used to change the name that you have
previously assigned to a partition or logical drive.
Assign C: partition This choice is used to specify which primary partition you
want to be active (when more than one primary partition is installed on your
system).  The placement of the drive letter (C) tells you which primary
partition will be visible (or accessible) after you restart the system.
Set startup values This choice is used to specify the actions of the Boot
Manager startup menu.  For example, with Set startup values, you can specify
how long you want the Boot Manager menu to be displayed before the default
operating system is started. You can also specify which operating system you
want as the default.
Remove from Boot Manager menu This choice is used to delete a name from the
Boot Manager startup menu.  When you delete the name, you can no longer select
the operating system associated with that name from the Boot Manager startup
menu.
Delete partition This choice is used to delete information about a primary
partition or logical drive.  After you exit from FDISK, all the data in the
partition or logical drive is deleted.  (If you want to save any of the data in
a partition, be sure to back up the data be fore deleting the partition.)
Set installable This choice is used to mark a partition or logical drive as the
target for installation.  For example, during the installation of OS/2, you set
one primary partition (or logical drive) as installable. (This partition or
drive is the drive on which OS/2 is installed.)
After you install the operating system, the status of this partition will
change from Installable to Bootable.
If you use FDISK after the OS/2 installation (in preparation for installing
other operating systems), you can mark only primary partitions on the first
hard disk as installable.
Any partition that is set installable must reside within the first 1024
cylinders of the hard disk.  In addition, if you have more than two hard disk
drives, be aware that some adapter manufacturers  support the booting of
partitions on the first two hard disk drives only.
Also note that some SCSI drives that use removable media cannot be partitioned.
Make startable This choice is used to determine which primary partition is
activated when you start your system.  When you install the Boot Manager, it is
automatically marked as Startable.  This means that the Boot Manager is in
control when you start your system.  Only one primary partition on the first
hard disk can be made startable.  If you set any other primary partition
startable, the Boot Manager startup menu will not appear when you start the
system.
Creating a Boot Manager Setup    278/2+

The following sections describe in detail how to delete and create partitions, how and why to make selections from the Options menu, and how to specify options for how the Boot Manager will start up. Using Advanced Installation provides quick procedures you can follow to perform these actions. You can refer to the sections here if you need more detailed information.

Deleting Existing Partitions    279/3

To set up your system for installation, you must make sure there is enough room on your hard disk to accommodate the desired partitions. If you use the Advanced Installation method to install OS/2,

it might be necessary for you to delete some or

all of the existing partitions on your hard disk. For example, if your hard disk currently has only one partition that takes up the entire hard disk and you want to put OS/2 in its own partition, you must delete the existing partition. However, if your hard disk has ample free space for OS/2, you can keep one or more existing partitions and add to them. Important: All information you want to save must be backed up. Changing the size of a partition deletes all information in that partition, and the entire operating system must be reinstalled when the new partition is created. To delete an existing partition, you would follow these steps:

  1. On the FDISK screen, use the Up or Down Arrow key to highlight the
     partition you want to delete.
  2. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
  3. Select Delete partition and press Enter.  The information about that
     partition is deleted, and the words Free Space appear in the space
     formerly occupied by the partition information.
  4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 for any other partitions you want to delete.
After deleting the partitions on your hard disk, you must create the Boot
Manager partition.
Creating the Boot Manager Partition    280/3

During the Advanced Installation method, you must create a Boot Manager partition. To create this partition, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure that the Free Space line is highlighted on the FDISK screen.
      If it is not, use the Up or Down Arrow key to highlight it.
  2. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
  3. Select Install Boot Manager and press Enter.
  4. Specify whether the Boot Manager partition should be at the beginning or
     at the end of the available free space on the hard disk.
     Note:  The only restriction on the placement of the Boot Manager partition
     is that it be within the first 1024 cylinders of the first hard disk.
     Typically, the first 1024 cylinders is equal to 1GB (gigabyte), or 1024MB.
After creating the Boot Manager partition, you can create any other partitions
you need to install OS/2 and the other operating systems you want to use on
your computer.
Creating Partitions for Other Operating Systems    281/3+

After you create the partition for the Boot Manager, you create primary partitions for any DOS or Windows versions or previous versions of OS/2 that you are going to install. At this time, you can also create any logical drives for data or programs or to install OS/2. Consider the following before you begin creating the partitions:

  o  If you prefer, and if you have sufficient free space on the hard disk, you
     can leave existing partitions intact until you have completely transferred
     data processing operations to OS/2.
  o  You can install OS/2 in its own partition and place your programs and data
     in a separate logical drive.  This arrangement makes it easier to back up
     those programs and data.
  o  If multiple types of file systems are needed, determine if you want them
     in a separate partition or placed on a logical drive.
  o  When determining how much space to allocate for the OS/2 partition,
     consider some of the tools and applications you will be installing and
     whether you want to install them in the OS/2 partition or on another
     logical drive.  For example, if you want to install the OS/2 Toolkit, you
     can install it on a separate logical drive instead of the default
     partition used for OS/2.
  o  Allow enough room in your OS/2 partition for the growth of a swap file.  A
     swap file contains segments of a program
      or data temporarily
     moved out of main storage.  The swap file (SWAPPER.DAT) requires at least
     2MB of hard disk space but might require much more.  You can include this
     space in your OS/2 partition, or you can set up a logical drive for the
     swap file.
  o  Some operating systems, such as AIX*, require that their own disk utility
     program create the installation partition.  The OS/2 FDISK utility program
     cannot create the partition for these operating systems. If you are going
     to install AIX, make sure you leave sufficient free space for it on the
     hard disk.
  o  If you have applications that require other operating systems, such as
     AIX, check the amount of storage space recommended by the supplier.
To create partitions and logical drives for your other operating systems and
for your programs and data, follow these steps:
  1. Make sure that the Free Space line is highlighted on the FDISK screen.
      If it is not, use the Up or Down Arrow key to highlight it.
  2. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
  3. Select Create partition and press Enter.
  4. Type the size (in MB) of the partition you are creating.  Use the
     following table to help you determine a minimum size for the partition.
      For specific information about partition sizes, refer to the
     documentation
     that came with the product you will be installing.
     place=inline width=column frame=box id=dpart rules=horiz hdframe=rules
     hp='2 0 0
     0' split=yes expand.
     ZDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     ?
     3          Planning Table for Partition Sizes
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 CONTENTS 3 SIZE     3 HARD DISK CONSIDERATIONS
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 DOS 3.3  3 2MB      3 Must be in a primary partition within the first
     32MB   3
     3          3          3 on the first hard disk.
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 DOS 4.0  3 3MB      3 Must be in a primary partition on the first hard
     disk. 3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 DOS 5.0  3 4MB      3 Must be in a primary partition on the first hard
     disk. 3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 DOS 6.x  3 8MB      3 Must be in a primary partition on the first hard
     disk. 3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 OS/2 1.x 3 20MB     3 Must be in a primary partition on the first hard
     disk. 3
     3 SE       3          3 Installs in less than 20MB, but segment swapping
     is    3
     3          3          3 inhibited.
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 OS/2 1.x 3 30MB     3 Must be in a primary partition on the first hard
     disk. 3
     3 EE       3          3 Installs in less than 30MB with reduced function.
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 OS/2 2.0 3 15-33MB  3 Can be in a primary partition or logical drive.
     If    3
     3          3          3 you choose a minimum size for the partition, you
     might 3
     3          3          3 want to place the swap file on another partition.
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 OS/2 2.1 3 20-40MB  3 OS/2 2.1 can be in a primary partition or logical
     3
     3          3 (Plus    3 drive.  If you choose a minimum size for the
     parti-    3
     3          3 10MB for 3 tion, you might want to place the swap file on
     another 3
     3          3 swap     3 partition.
     3
     3          3 file and 3
     3
     3          3 5MB for  3 If you want to install all the features and you
     want   3
     3          3 multi-   3 the swap file in the same partition, consider
     making   3
     3          3 media)   3 the OS/2 partition larger.
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 OS/2     3 25-45MB  3 OS/2 can be in a primary partition or logical
     drive.   3
     3 Version  3 (Plus    3 If you choose a minimum size for the partition,
     you    3
     3 3        3 10MB for 3 might want to place the swap file on another
     parti-    3
     3          3 swap     3 tion.
     3
     3          3 file and 3
     3
     3          3 10MB for 3 If you want to install all the features and you
     want   3
     3          3 multi-   3 the swap file in the same partition, consider
     making   3
     3          3 media)   3 the OS/2 partition larger.
     3
     CDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     4
     3 AIX      3          3 Partition size determined and built by AIX Disk
     3
     3          3          3 utility program.  Partition is created at the end
     of   3
     3          3          3 the hard disk.
     3
     @DDDDDDDDDDADDDDDDDDDDADDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
     Y
     Place system tools or common applications in a logical drive within the
     extended partition so that the data can be shared among the operating
     systems.
  5. Specify whether this is a primary partition or a logical drive within the
     extended partition.  Consider the following:
       o  All versions of DOS must reside in primary partitions on the first
          hard disk. Versions of OS/2 before 2.0 must also reside in primary
          partitions. (Remember that primary partitions cannot share data.)
       o  Logical drives within an extended partition are shareable.  This
          means that any data installed in the logical drive can be used by an
          operating system running from any other active logical drive on the
          system, if the file system formats are compatible.
  6. Specify the location of the partition or logical drive you want to create.
       Select either Create at Start of Free Space or Create at End of Free
     Space.  Note that the logical drives cannot be intermixed with primary
     partitions.
     Note:  This option is not available when the amount of free space equals
     the size of the request.
When you have set up the partition, you use the Options menu choices to specify
information about the partition.
Specifying Options for the New Partition    282/4

To specify options for the partition you just created, use the following procedure. Refer to The Options Menu for detailed explanations of the choices on the Options menu.

  1. From the FDISK screen, Press Enter to display the Options menu.
  2. Select Add to Boot Manager menu if you want this partition displayed on
     the Boot Manager startup menu.  If you do not select this choice for the
     partition, you cannot select the operating system that exists in this
     partition from the menu at startup time.
  3. If you selected Add to Boot Manager menu, you see the window in which you
     are asked to type a name for the partition. Type the name, and then press
     Enter.
If you have additional partitions to set up, follow the instructions outlined
in Creating Partitions for Other Operating Systems. Otherwise, continue to
Creating the Partition for OS/2.
Creating the Partition for OS/2    283/3

After you have created the partitions for the Boot Manager and for each of the other operating systems you plan to install, create the partition or logical drive in which you will install OS/2 OS/2 can be installed in either a primary partition or a logical drive within the extended partition. Remember that some operating systems, such as AIX, use their own disk utility program to set up partitions. The partitions for such operating systems are created when you actually install the operating systems. You must leave sufficient space on the hard disk to accommodate these operating systems. To create the partition or logical drive for OS/2, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure that the Free Space line is highlighted. If it is not, press the
     Up Arrow ( ) or Down Arrow ( ) key to highlight it.
  2. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
  3. Select Create partition and press Enter.
  4. Type the size (in MB) of the partition or logical drive you are creating.
     Note that the size of the swap file is based on the size of installed
     memory. The less memory you have, the larger the swap file. Thus, if your
     computer has a small amount of memory, you will need a larger partition.
     (You can also place the swap file on another partition.  To do this,
     select Software configuration from the OS/2 Setup and Installation window
     that appears during the Installation program. ) If you want to install all
     features and you want the swap file on the same partition, consider making
     the OS/2 partition large enough to accommodate all of those files.
  5. Specify whether this partition is a primary partition or a logical drive
     within the extended partition.
     If you have already marked three partitions as primary partitions, you
     might want to select Extended Logical Drive for OS/2. Your hard disk can
     be made up of a maximum of four primary partitions or three primary
     partitions and multiple logical drives within one extended partition. So,
     if you create a primary partition for OS/2 when three primary partitions
     already exist, you cannot create any logical drives.
  6. Specify the location of the partition or logical drive you want to create.
     Note:  This option is not available when the amount of free space equals
     the size of the request.
Specifying Options for the OS/2 Partition    284/3

During the Installation program, you can use the Options menu choices to specify information about the OS/2 partition or logical drive:

  1. From the FDISK screen, press Enter to display the Options menu.
  2. Highlight Add to Boot Manager menu and press Enter.
  3. Type the name you want to assign to this partition or logical drive, and
     press Enter.
  4. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
  5. Highlight Set installable and press Enter.
     You must select Set installable for this partition or logical drive. By
     selecting Set installable, you indicate which partition or logical drive
     should be used for OS/2.
Specifying the Default Operating System    285/3

After you create partitions for all of your operating systems, including OS/2, you may specify which operating system should be started (by default) every time you start your computer. Follow these steps:

  1. Highlight the line on the FDISK screen that contains the information for
     the operating system you want preselected at startup time.  For example,
     if you want OS/2 to be the preselected choice on the Boot Manager startup
     menu, highlight the OS/2 Version 3 line.
  2. Press Enter to display the Options menu.
  3. Select Set startup values and press Enter.
  4. With Default highlighted, press Enter.  Notice that the name of the
     partition you chose is listed next to Default.
  5. Press F3.
     If you want to set the timer for how long the Boot Manager menu should be
     displayed and how information on the menu should appear, you can do so
     during the installation of OS/2 or you can do so after installation.  To
     set the timer and display mode now, continue with the sections that
     follow, "Setting the Menu Display Time" and "Setting the Menu Mode."
     Otherwise, go to step 6.
  6. Press F3
Setting the Menu Display Time    286/3+

To indicate how long you want the Boot Manager startup menu displayed when you start your system, follow these steps:

  1. From the Set startup values menu, you can do one of the following:
       o  If you want the menu displayed for a certain period of time before
          the default operating system starts, accept the value of Yes.
       o  If you want the menu to be displayed indefinitely (until you
          explicitly select a choice from the menu), highlight Timer and press
          Enter to change the value to No.
  2. If you selected Yes for Timer, indicate how long you want the menu
     displayed before the default operating system is started.  You can do one
     of the following:
       o  Accept the value listed next to Timeout.
       o  Change the value as follows:
            a. Select Timeout and press Enter.
            b. Type the amount of time (in seconds) that you want the menu
               displayed before 	the preselected operating system is
               automatically started.
            c. Press Enter.
Setting the Menu Mode    287/4

You can select either Normal or Advanced for the Boot Manager menu mode. If you select Advanced, your Boot Manager menu will include additional information about your partitions. To change the mode that is currently displayed:

  1. Highlight Mode on the Set startup values menu.
  2. Press Enter.
When you have finished configuring your Boot Manager menu, press F3.  Then
continue with the installation of OS/2.
Selecting a File System    288/2

If you choose to format an existing partition during the Installation program, you will be asked to select a file system. A file system is the part of the operating system that provides access to files and programs on a disk. You can select either the File Allocation Table (FAT) file system or the High Performance File System (HPFS).

  o  Select the FAT file system if you intend to share data in the partition
     with a version of DOS that is running independently of OS/2. (For example,
     if you occasionally need to start DOS from a diskette and access the data
     in the OS/2 partition, the partition would have to be formatted for the
     FAT file system.) DOS uses the FAT file system, and does not recognize
     files created by HPFS.  Although DOS does not recognize HPFS, this is not
     the case for DOS sessions that are part of OS/2.  If you plan to run you
     r DOS programs in the DOS sessions that are part of OS/2, you can format
     for either file system.  The only restriction for DOS programs running in
     these DOS sessions is that they will not recognize the longer file names
     in the HPFS partition.
  o  HPFS has features that make it a better choice for larger hard disk
     partitions.  It puts the directory at the seek center of the partition and
     is designed to allocate contiguous space for files.  This feature helps
     prevent disk fragmentation.  HPFS also handles write errors by writing to
     alternate space reserved for that purpose.
HPFS also supports file names up to 254 characters in length.
If you format an OS/2 partition for the FAT file system and the system memory
is less than or equal to 6MB, support for HPFS is not automatically installed.
You can add this support later (for example, if you want to format another
partition for HPFS) using the Selective Install utility program (located in the
System Setup folder).
If you are trying to decide whether to use HPFS, consider that it takes at
least 200KB of system memory.  If your computer has 6MB or less of memory, your
system performance will be adversely affected.
Changing System Options from the OS/2 Setup and Installation Window    289/2+

During Advanced Installation, the OS/2 Setup and Installation window appears so you can select the features of the operating system that you want to install. You can also use the menu bar at the top of the window to indicate an alternate drive for your swap file, and to modify your CONFIG.SYS file.

Installing the Swap File and WIN-OS/2 Support in a Logical Drive    290/3

If you use the Advanced Installation method, you can install the swap file and WIN-OS/2 support in another partition or logical drive to save hard disk space in your OS/2 partition. When you are setting up your partitions with the FDISK utility program, you can create a logical drive just for this purpose. When the OS/2 Setup and Installation window appears during the installation process, follow these steps:

  1. Select Software configuration from the menu bar of the OS/2 Setup and
     Installation window.
  2. Select Change OS/2 parameters.
  3. Make sure the cursor is in the SWAPPATH field by selecting the field with
     the mouse or the Tab key.  Replace the default location of the swap file
     with the desired location.  For example, to place the swap file in the
     root directory of logical drive D, type
      d:\.
  4. Select OK or press Enter.
  5. Select the More push button next to WIN-OS/2 Support.
  6. Select the Down Arrow in the Destination drive field to change the drive
     to the desired logical drive (drive D in this example).
  7. Select OK.
Modifying the CONFIG.SYS File during Installation    291/3

During Advanced Installation, you can customize your system by modifying the CONFIG.SYS file. To do so, follow these steps when the OS/2 Setup and Installation window appears during installation:

  1. Select Software configuration from the menu bar at the top of the window.
  2. Select either Change OS/2 parameters or Change DOS parameters.
     For example, if you want to change the MINFREE setting for the swap file,
     select Change OS/2 parameters.  Then specify the size on the window that
     is displayed.  The MINFREE setting is used to specify when the system
     should warn you about the growth of the swap file.
  3. Select OK when you have finished making all the selections in the window.
     The OS/2 Setup and Installation window will reappear.
  4. Make your selections in the OS/2 Setup and Installation window to continue
     with the installation of OS/2.
Special Hardware Considerations    292/1+

This chapter provides information to help you if you are installing OS/2 Version 3 on or using the following hardware:

     Gateway 2000
     A system with Phoenix, AMI, or Micronics BIOS
     ATI Graphics Ultra Pro display adapter
     An EISA system with an Adaptec 1742A controller card
     IBM PS/2 with ABIOS on the Reference Diskette
     IBM PS/2 Model 76
     IBM ThinkPad with a Docking Station
     A system with an Aox upgrade
     Quantum II Hard Card
     Sony, Panasonic, Creative Labs, IBM ISA, Philips, Mitsumi, BSR, or Tandy
     non-SCSI CD-ROM drive
     Unsupported CD-ROM or SCSI/CD-ROM Combination
     IBM M-Audio Capture and Playback Adapter
     Sound Blaster
     Pro AudioSpectrum 16
Using Gateway 2000 Computers    293/2+

If you have an early version of a Gateway 2000 computer that does not work properly, your BIOS might be an early version. The company suggests that you replace the system board. Contact Gateway 2000, Inc. for information about upgrading your computer.

486 Math Coprocessors    294/3

If you have a Gateway 2000 computer with a 486 processor and a revision E system board, you could experience a divide underflow error. The error can occur when you are running software that takes advantage of the 486 math coprocessor. If this error occurs, you can upgrade to a revision F system board by contacting Gateway.

TRAP0002 Errors on Boot or Installation    295/3

Gateway computers that cause a TRAP0002 error are caused by one of the following:

  o  A bad Read Ahead Cache on the system board
  o  Bad memory
When the problem is a bad Read Ahead Cache on the system board, press
Ctrl+Alt+Del to display a menu from which you can disable the external caching.
Refer to your Gateway documentation for more information. Contact Gateway when
this problem is encountered.
When the problem is bad memory, try moving each memory module to a different
memory controller.  If the problem is not corrected, determine which memory
module is bad and replace it.
Gateway Nomad Notebook    296/3

If you receive a message that OS/2 is unable to operate your hard disk or your diskette drive, your computer needs a BIOS upgrade. If a TRAP error appears when the system is started, or during installation, disable caching on the system board. If the problem persists, contact Gateway 2000, Inc.

Using Phoenix, AMI, or Micronics BIOS    297/2+

This section provides information about computers that require a BIOS upgrade to support OS/2 Version 3.

Phoenix BIOS    298/3

For questions about products that use Phoenix BIOS, call the computer manufacturer directly. If there are additional questions, contact Phoenix.

AMI BIOS    299/3+

The later BIOS versions from American Megatrends, Inc. (AMI) provide a screen ID code, which is visible at the lower-left corner of the screen during the initial random access memory (RAM) count. The code can be made to reappear if you restart the system by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del, or it can be frozen on screen by holding down the Ins key during system startup. This creates a keyboard error, which will stop the screen. On a system that uses AMI BIOS or AMI BIOS Plus, the message will be in the form: aaaa-bbbb-mmddyy-Kc On a system than uses AMI HI-Flex BIOS, the message will be in the form: ee-ffff-bbbbbb-gggggggg-mmddyy-hhhhhhhh-c If the screen ID code is in a form other than those above, one of the following is true:

  o  The BIOS is a very early version.  In this case, contact Washburn & Co.
  o  The BIOS was produced by a company with source-code license. In this case,
     the system board manufacturer will be able to provide further information
     or updates.  All Everex** 368 BIOS versions are in this category.
General Rules    300/4
  o  If an IDE-type hard drive is installed, the date mmddyy should be 040990
     or later for use with any operating system, including DOS. Special timing
     requirements of IDE drives were accommodated on the date noted.
  o  If you use any other drive type, such as MFM, RLL, ESDI, or SCSI, the OS/2
     operating system might install and operate correctly if mmddyy is 092588
     or later, provided that the Keyboard Controller revision level is suitable
     for the OS/2 version being used.  Also, in the case of SCSI hard drives, a
     driver compatible with the version of OS/2 operating system being
     installed might be provided by the controller manufacturer, and if so, a
     special installation procedure might apply.
  o  Keyboard Controller revision level F (represented by "c" in the previous
     screen ID code examples) is expected to produce proper installation and
     operation of OS/2 versions 1.3x and 2.x.
          OS/2 1.0 or 1.1:   8, B, D, or F
          OS/2 1.2x:         D or F
          OS/2 1.3x or 2.:   F
  o  If the Keyboard Controller revision level shows as 0 or M, the Keyboard
     Controller chip is not an AMI chip, even if an AMI license sticker was
     applied to it. If it is not an AMI chip, its performance under the OS/2
     operating system is unknown.  It might or might not work correctly.  For
     some revision levels (usually "M"), an AMI chip can successfully replace a
     non-AMI chip, but this is not a general rule.  Sometimes the nonstandard
     Keyboard Controller (usually "0") was used to combine system board
     functions not normally part of the controller. Substituting a standard
     chip causes the board to not function at all. In this case, there is no
     solution other than to replace the board. A revision level of 9
     accompanied by a nonstandard ID code also indicates a nonstandard
     controller (and BIOS). The system board manufacturer should be contacted
     for further information.
BIOS Updates    301/4

If a BIOS prior to the previously noted dates requires replacement, note the following:

  o  AMI BIOS and BIOS Plus series BIOS (16 character ID code) for cached
     system boards are customized for individual system board designs.  You can
     obtain updates only from the system board manufacturer, unless you have
     one of the following:
       1. A BIOS with "aaaa" = E307. This BIOS can be replaced with a standard
          type.
       2. A BIOS for Northgate** or Motherboard Factory** system boards, except
          the Northgate Slimline**.  This BIOS can be replaced by a standard
          type.  The Slimline BIOS has the VGA BIOS in the same chips. They can
          be updated to the 040990 release, provided they are identified as
          Slimline, and the speed is specified (20, 25, or 33 MHz).  The speed
          must be specified because different VGA code is required for the
          various speeds.
       3. A BIOS with "aaaa" = DAMI, DAMX, or EDAMI (usually for cached boards
          d  esigned or built by AMI). This BIOS can be updated.  Mylex or
          Leading Technology** boards with these prefixes can only be updated
          by the board manufacturer.
  o  The complete screen ID code is necessary to determine whether a BIOS
     update for other system boards can be provided. In the case of the HI-Flex
     BIOS, the complete second and third lines of the ID code are also
     necessary.  If not immediately visible on the screen, they can be viewed
     by pressing the Ins key during system startup.
  o  If you have a hard disk drive from another manufacturer, it must be dated
     092588 or later.  If your hard disk drive is an earlier version, contact
     the dealer at your place of purchase, or the hard disk manufacturer, for
     information about upgrading the drive.
Micronics BIOS    302/3

If you have revision E of a Micronics system board, you might receive a divide underflow message, or your computer might not work properly. This board contains an early version of BIOS. If you purchased the board from Gateway, contact Gateway 2000, Inc. request an upgrade to revision F.

Using the ATI Graphics Ultra Pro Display Adapter    303/2

If you have an ATI Graphics Ultra Pro, you must run the INSTALL.EXE utility program provided by ATI before you install OS/2 Version 3. Note that this is a DOS program and you must, therefore, start DOS before you run the program. Note: If you have a Gateway 2000 system, refer also to "Black Lines on an OS/2 Logo Screen" in Solving Installation Problems

  1. Start DOS on your computer.
  2. Insert the ATI diskette into drive A.
  3. Type a:install.exe and press Enter. The Set Power-Up Configuration menu
     appears.
  4. Select Custom for Monitor Type.
  5. Make sure that VGA Memory Sizeis set to Shared for 1 MB video memory
     boards.
  6. Make sure that the refresh rate for 640 x 480 resolution is set to IBM
     Default or 60 Hz.
     Note:  Later during the installation of OS/2 Version 3, be sure to select
     8514 as the primary display type.
Using an EISA System with an Adaptec 1742A Controller Card    304/2

If you have an EISA system with an Adaptec 1742A controller card, you must run the Setup Configuration program provided on the Adaptec Card Setup Diskette before installing OS/2 Version 3. To set up the Adaptec card in the configuration using the Setup Diskette, do the following:

  1. Set the Enhanced mode setting to OFF.
  2. Set the Standard mode setting to ON.
  3. Set the Hex Address setting to C800.
  4. Set the I/O Port setting to 230H.
  5. Set the DMA channel setting to 5.
  6. Set the Parity Check setting to OFF.
  7. Set the Synchronous Negotiation setting to ON. If CD-ROM is not
     recognized, set this setting to OFF.
  8. Set the Enabled Disconnect setting to YES.
  9. Set the IRQ setting to 11 (default is 2).
Using an IBM PS/2 with ABIOS on the Reference Diskette    305/2

As part of the setup of your computer, you might have been advised to create a Reference Diskette (sometimes called a "Hardware System Program Diskette"). The Reference Diskette contains BIOS information (code about how your diskette drives, hard drives, and keyboard interact). The OS/2 Version 3 Installation program may prompt you to insert this diskette. If you have not created the Reference Diskette, do so before you begin the installation of OS/2 Version 3. Refer to your PS/2 documentation for instructions on creating this diskette.

Using an IBM PS/2 Model 76 or IBM ThinkPad with a Docking Station    306/2

If you are installing OS/2 Version 3 on an IBM PS/2 Model 76 or an IBM ThinkPad 700, 700C, 720, or 720C attached to a 3550 Docking Station, you need to replace the ABIOS files on the OS/2 Installation Diskette with files from the Reference Diskette. Do the following:

  1. If you are using a ThinkPad, detach it from the Docking Station.
  2. Create a Reference Diskette by following the documentation that came with
     your computer.
  3. Make a copy of the Installation Diskette. Type diskcopy a: a: and press
     Enter. Remove and insert diskettes when prompted to do so.
  4. Remove the copy from drive A and insert the original Installation
     Diskette.
  5. Turn your computer on.  If your computer is already on, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
     to restart it.
  6. When you are prompted to do so, remove the Installation Diskette, insert
     Diskette 1, and press Enter.
  7. When the Welcome screen appears, press F3 to display the command prompt.
  8. Insert the copy of the Installation Diskette into drive A.
  9. Type a:\del *.bio and press Enter.
 10. Remove the copy of the Installation Diskette and insert the Reference
     Diskette you created into drive A.
 11. If your computer has more than one diskette drive, insert the copy of the
     Installation Diskette into drive B. In the next two steps, you will be
     prompted to insert diskettes into both drive A and drive B.
     If you computer has only one diskette drive, when you are asked to insert
     a diskette into drive A, insert the Reference Diskette into your diskette
     drive. When you are asked to insert a diskette into drive B, insert the
     copy of the Installation Diskette into your diskette drive.
 12. Type copy a:\*.bio b:\ and press Enter.
 13. Type copy a:\abios.sys b:\ and press Enter.
 14. Turn off your computer.  If you are using a ThinkPad, return it to the
     Docking Station.
Using a System with an Aox Upgrade    307/2

If you have a system with a 286 processor that has been upgraded to a 386SX with an Aox upgrade and you want to install OS/2 Version 3, you must start the system with DOS and run the AOX232.EXE. Contact the Aox Technical Support Group to request a copy of AOX232.EXE before continuing with the installation of OS/2.

Using a Quantum II XL Hard Card    308/2

If you have a Quantum hard card, you must make a modification to the BASEDEV=IBM1S506.ADD line in the CONFIG.SYS file. To modify the BASEDEV statement, do the following:

  1. Edit the CONFIG.SYS file on Diskette 1.
  2. Change the BASEDEV statement to:
     BASEDEV=IBM1S506.ADD /A:1 /IRQ
     (The settings shown are the defaults for the Quantum hard card.)
  3. Save the CONFIG.SYS file.
  4. Install OS/2 Version 3.
Using a Sony, Panasonic, Creative Labs, IBM ISA, Philips, Mitsumi,  BSR, or Tandy Non-SCSI CD-ROM Drive    309/2+

For the Sony, Panasonic, Creative Labs, IBM ISA, Philips, Mitsumi, BSR, or Tandy non-SCSI drives to be recognized by OS/2 Version 3, the base port address specified on the CD-ROM BASEDEV statement in the CONFIG.SYS file must match the base I/O port address specified on the CD-ROM host adapter card. Note: If you are installing OS/2 from a CD-ROM, you might first need to modify the BASEDEV statement for your CD-ROM device driver in the CONFIG.SYS file on the diskette labeled Diskette 1. See also the section called "Using an Unsupported CD-ROM or SCSI/CD-ROM Combination."

Modifying the CONFIG.SYS for the Sony CDU-31A Device Driver    310/3

The Sony SONY31A.ADD device driver supports the following CD-ROM drives:

     Sony CDU-31A, CDU-7305
     Sony CDU-33A, CDU-7405
This section lists the parameters that are supported for the Sony CD-ROM device
driver.  The parameters can be changed by modifying the BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD
line in the CONFIG.SYS file. Also change the transfer mode from the default,
software polling transfer, to software interrupt transfer.  The syntax for the
BASEDEV statement is as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD [/A:d][/AT:dd][/P:nnn][/I:nn][/V]
where:
[/A:d]    Identifies a specific adapter, d. The adapter is specified as a
          single-digit value which is zero based (for example, the first
          adapter is specified as /A:0).
[/AT:dd]  Sets the adapter type connected to the CD-ROM drive. Supported values
          are:
     00 = Sony CDB-334 (default)
     05 = Echo** Speech (with ESC614 chip)
                 Orchid** SoundWave 32
                 Orchid GameWave 32
                 Cardinal DSP16
     08 = MediaVision** Pro AudioSpectrum 16
[/P:nnn]  Specifies the base I/O port address of the interface card. The port
          address is specified as a four-digit hex value.  Leading zeros should
          be specified. The value must be the same number as the port address
          selected by the jumper on the host interface card.
          If this parameter is not specified, the default port address for the
          host adapter is used.  For the Sony CDB-334 host interface card, the
          default is 0340. For the Media Vision Pro AudioSpectrum 16 card, the
          default is 1F88.
[/I:nn]   Specifies the interrupt request (IRQ) channel number. This must match
          the value specified on the jumper setting on the interface card. If
          this parameter is not specified, the device driver will use software
          polling transfer.
          Note:  Some Sony CDB-334 host adapter cards do not include the
          plastic jumper switch to select the IRQ channel on the IRQ jumper
          block.  You must obtain and install the plastic jumper switch to
          enable the IRQ channel.
[/V]      Instructs the device driver to display the device driver revision
          level and CD-ROM product information at startup time.
The examples that follow illustrate how this CD-ROM is attached to the most
common host adapters and indicate the required parameter switch settings for
each CD-ROM drive.
Example 1:  The Sony CDU-31A or CDU-33A CD-ROM drive is attached to a Sony
CDB-334 host adapter.
The Sony CDB-334 host adapter supports base I/O port addresses of 320h, 330h,
340h, or 360h.  If the host adapter is set to its default port address of 340h,
the CONFIG.SYS statement does not need to be modified and should appear as
follows:
BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD
If the CDB-334 host adapter is set to any port address other than the default
of 340h, the CONFIG.SYS statement must be modified. For example, if the Sony
CDB-334 host adapter is set to a base I/O port address of 360, the line in the
CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD /A:0 /P
If, in the above situation, the driver is operating in interrupt mode at IRQ
channel 5, the line in your CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD /A:0 /P:0360 /I
Example 2:  The Sony CDU-31A or CDU-33A CD-ROM drive is attached to a
MediaVision Pro AudioSpectrum 16 host adapter.
In this case, the line in CONFIG.SYS must be modified and should appear as
follows:
BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD /A:0 /AT
Note:  The default port address for the CDU-31A when attached to the PAS-16
card is 1F88. The Sony Desktop Library model numbers CDU-31A-LL/L and CDU-7305
include the PAS-16 adapter.
Example 3:  The Sony CDU-31A or CDU-33A CD-ROM drive is attached to a Creative
Labs Sound Blaster Pro, Sound Blaster 16, or Sound Blaster 16 MultiCD host
adapter.
The port address specified on the BASEDEV statement in CONFIG.SYS should be 10h
above the base I/O port address specified on these adapter cards.  For example,
if the Sound Blaster card is set for a base I/O port address of 220h, the line
in CONFIG.SYS should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD /A:0 /P
Example 4:  The Sony CDU-31A or CDU-33A CD-ROM drive is attached to the Echo
Speech, Orchid SoundWave 32, Orchid GameWave 32, or Cardinal DSP16 host
adapter.
In this case, the line in CONFIG.SYS must be modified and should appear as
follows:
BASEDEV=SONY31A.ADD /A:0 /AT
Modifying the CONFIG.SYS for the Sony CDU-535 Device Driver    311/3

The Sony SONY535.ADD device driver supports the following CD-ROM drives:

     Sony 531 series (CDU-531, 6201, 6205)
     Sony 535 series (CDU-535, 6205, 7205)
This section lists the parameters that are supported for the Sony CD-ROM device
driver.  The parameters can be changed by modifying the BASEDEV=SONY535.ADD
line in the CONFIG.SYS file.  Also change the transfer mode from the default,
software polling transfer, to software interrupt transfer.  The syntax for the
BASEDEV statement is as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY535.ADD [P:nnn][/I:nn][/U:d,d...][/V]
where:
[/P:nnn]. Specifies the base I/O port address of the interface card. The value
          must be the same number as the port address specified by the jumper
          on the host interface card.
[/I:nn].  Specifies the interrupt request (IRQ) channel number. This must match
          the value specified on the jumper setting on the interface card. If
          this parameter is not specified, the device driver will use software
          polling transfer.
          Note:  Some Sony host adapter cards do not include the plastic jumper
          switch to select the IRQ channel on the IRQ jumper block.  You must
          obtain and install the plastic jumper switch to enable the IRQ
          channel.
[/U:d,d...]. Specifies the drive unit number which the Sony CD-ROM drive is set
          to.  The value of d must be set to 0, 1, 2, or 3.  If more than one
          Sony CD-ROM drive is attached to the adapter, this parameter must be
          specified.  If only one CD-ROM drive is attached to the adapter, and
          this parameter is not specified, then the default unit ID used by the
          driver is 0.
[/V].     Instructs the device driver to display the device driver revision
          level and CD-ROM product information at startup time.
The examples that follow illustrate how this CD-ROM is attached to the most
common host adapters and indicate the required parameter switch settings for
each CD-ROM drive.
Example 1:  A Sony CD-ROM drive is attached to a Sony CDB-240 series host
adapter.
If the Sony host adapter is set to a base I/O port address of 360, the line in
the CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY535.ADD /P:360
Example 2:  A Sony CD-ROM drive is attached to a Sony CDB-240 series host
adapter.
If the Sony CD-ROM drive is attached to the Sony host adapter at a base I/O
port address of 360h, and the driver is operating in interrupt mode at IRQ
channel 5, the line in the CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY535.ADD /P:360 /I:5
Example 3:  Multiple Sony CD-ROM drives are daisy-chained to a Sony CDB-240
series host adapter.
If two Sony CD-ROM drives are daisy-chained from the Sony host adapter with the
first drive set to drive unit 0 and the second set to drive unit 1, the line in
the CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SONY535.ADD /P:340 /U:0,1
Modifying CONFIG.SYS for the Panasonic Device Driver    312/3

The Panasonic device driver (SBCD2.ADD) supports the following CD-ROM drives:

  o  Panasonic CR-521, 522, 523, 562, 563
  o  Creative Labs OmniCD
  o  IBM ISA CD-ROM drive
This section lists the parameters that are supported for the Panasonic CD-ROM
device driver.  The parameters can be changed by modifying the
BASEDEV=SBCD2.ADD line in the CONFIG.SYS file. Also change the transfer mode
from the default, software polling transfer, to software interrupt transfer.
The syntax for the BASEDEV statement is as follows: BASEDEV=SBCD2.ADD
[/P:nnn][/T:n][/NS][/V]
where:
[./P:nnn] Specifies the base I/O port address of the interface card.  The value
          must be the same number as the port address selected by the jumper on
          the host interface card.
[./T:n]   Sets the adapter type connected to the CD-ROM drive. The supported
          value is:
     Creative Labs CD-ROM interface card (not Sound Blaster)
[./NS]    Disables drive select scan.  Driver will not scan for more than one
          CD-ROM drive.
[./V]     Instructs the device driver to display the device driver revision
          level and CD-ROM product information at startup time.
The examples that follow illustrate how this CD-ROM is attached to the most
common host adapters and indicate the required parameter switch settings for
each CD-ROM drive.
Example 1:  A Panasonic, Creative Labs OmniCD, or IBM ISA CD-ROM drive is
attached to a standard Panasonic or IBM ISA CD-ROM host adapter.
The standard Panasonic or IBM ISA host adapter supports base I/O port addresses
of 300h, 310h, 320h, or 330h.  For example, if the adapter is set to a base I/O
port address of 300, the line in the CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SBCD2.ADD /P:300
Example 2:  A Panasonic, Creative Labs OmniCD, or IBM ISA CD-ROM drive is
attached to a Creative Labs Sound Blaster Pro, Sound Blaster 16, or Sound
Blaster 16 MultiCD.
If the Sound Blaster card is set for a base I/O address of 220h, the line in
CONFIG.SYS should appears as follows:
BASEDEV=SBCD2.ADD /P:220
Example 3:  A Creative Labs OmniCD is attached to a standard Creative Labs
CD-ROM host adapter (not Sound Blaster).
The standard Creative Labs host adapter supports base I/O port addresses of
250h or 260h.  For example, if the adapter is set to a base I/O port address of
250, the line in the CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SBCD2.ADD /P:250 /T:2
Example 4:  A Panasonic, Creative Labs OmniCD, or IBM ISA CD-ROM drive is
attached to a MediaVision Jazz 16 sound card.
If the MediaVision card is set for a base I/O port address of 300h, the line in
the CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SBCD2.ADD /P:300 /NS
Example 5:  A Panasonic, Creative Labs OmniCD, or IBM ISA CD-ROM drive is
attached to a Reveal audio card.
If the Reveal audio card is set to a base I/O port address of 630h, the line in
the CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=SBCD2.ADD /P:630
Modifying CONFIG.SYS for the Philips CD-ROM Device Drivers    313/3

The Philips device driver (LMS205.ADD) supports the following CD-ROM drives:

     Philips CM205, CM225
The Philips device driver (LMS206.ADD) supports the following CD-ROM drives:
     Philips CM205MS,CM225MS (multisession photo CD version of CM205)
     Philips CM206, CM226
Note:  If you have installed OS/2 and find that your CD-ROM drive does not
function, you  must copy the LMS206.ADD file from Diskette 1 to the \OS2
directory and add the following line to your CONFIG.SYS file:
BASEDEV=LMS206.ADD
This section lists the parameters that are supported for the Philips CD-ROM
device drivers.  The parameters can be changed by modifying the
BASEDEV=LMS205.ADD (or LMS206.ADD) line in the CONFIG.SYS file.  Also change
the transfer mode from the default, software polling transfer, to software
interrupt transfer. The syntax for the BASEDEV statement is as follows:
BASEDEV=LMS205.ADD [/P:nnn][/U:x][/M:y][/V]
where:
[./P:nnn] Specifies the base I/O port address of the interface card. The value
          must be the same number as the port address selected by the jumper on
          the host interface card.
[/U:x]    Identifies a specific unit, x.  Valid values for x are 0, 1, 2, and
          3.  The default is zero.  LMS205 and LMS206 locate all CM250 and
          CM260 host adapters and assign unit numbers based on the order in
          which each was found. This parameter tells LMS205 and LMS206 which
          BASEDEV line it is currently processing.
[/M:y]    Indicates the number of 2500-byte CD frame buffers that should be
          allocated by the LMS205.ADD or LMS2056.ADD driver. Valid values for y
          are 8,...,26.  The default is 16. Any value below the minimum (8)
          will be assigned the minimum (8).
[/V]      Instructs the device driver to display the device driver revision
          level and CD-ROM product information at startup time.
Modifying CONFIG.SYS for the Mitsumi CD-ROM Device Driver    314/3

The Mitsumi device driver (MITFX001.ADD) supports the following CD-ROM drives:

     Mitsumi CRMC-FX001D
     Mitsumi CRMC-FX001
     Mitsumi CRMC-LU005S
     Mitsumi CRMC-LU002S
     BSR 6800
     Tandy CDR-1000
This section lists the parameters that are supported for the Mitsumi CD-ROM
device driver.  The parameters can be changed by modifying the
BASEDEV=MITFX001.ADD line in the CONFIG.SYS file.  Also change the transfer
mode from the default, software polling transfer, to software interrupt
transfer.  The syntax for the BASEDEV statement is as follows:
BASEDEV=MITFX001.ADD [/P:nnn][/I:nn][/V]
where:
[/P:nnn]  Specifies the base I/O port address of the interface card.  This must
          be the same number as specified by the DIP switch on the interface
          card.
[/I:nn]   Specifies the interrupt request (IRQ) channel number. This must match
          the value specified on the jumper setting on the interface card.  If
          this parameter is not specified, the device driver will use software
          polling transfer.
[/V]      Instructs the device driver to display the device driver revision
          level and CD-ROM product information at startup time.
The examples that follow illustrate how this CD-ROM is attached to the most
common host adapters and indicate the required parameter switch settings for
each CD-ROM drive.
Example 1:  A Mitsumi CD-ROM drive is attached to a Mitsumi host adapter.
The Mitsumi host adapter supports I/O port address ranges from 300h to 3FCh.
If the Mitsumi host adapter is set to a base I/O port address of either 300h or
340h, the statement in CONFIG.SYS does not need to be modified and should
appear as follows:
BASEDEV=MITFX001.ADD
If the Mitsumi host adapter is set to an address other than those specified
above, the BASEDEV statement needs to be modified. For example, if the Mitsumi
host adapter is set to a base I/O port address of 320, the line in the
CONFIG.SYS file should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=MITFX001.ADD /P:320
Example 2:A Mitsumi CD-ROM drive is attached to a Creative Labs Sound Blaster
16 MultiCD.
If the Mitsumi CD-ROM port on the Sound Blaster 16 MultiCD is set to an I/O
port address of 340, the line in CONFIG.SYS should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=MITFX001.ADD /P:340
Note:    To enable interrupt transfer mode, which improves performance, the /I
parameter must be specified.  For example, to enable interrupt transfer mode
for IRQ channel 10 at I/O port address of 320h, the line in the CONFIG.SYS file
should appear as follows:
BASEDEV=MITFX001.ADD /P:320 /I:10
Using an Unsupported CD-ROM or SCSI/CD-ROM Combination    315/2

If you find that your drive or combination of CD-ROM drive and SCSI adapter is not supported by OS/2 Version 3, you can contact the manufacturer and obtain an OS/2 Adapter Device Driver (.ADD) file. Then, after you receive the .ADD file, use your current operating system and follow this procedure before you install OS/2:

  1. Make a copy of Diskette 1.  At a command prompt, type diskcopy a: a: and
     press Enter.
  2. Copy the .ADD file to the root directory on the copy of Diskette 1.  (The
     root directory is the first directory on the diskette.)  If there is not
     enough room, delete the following files from the copy of Diskette 1:
          For an ISA/EISA (non-Micro Channel) computer:  IBM2*.*
          For a Micro Channel computer:  IBM1*.*
     You will now have room to add device drivers to Diskette 1. However, if
     the .ADD driver is on a diskette, you might have to copy it to your hard
     disk before copying it to the copy of Diskette 1.
  3. Edit the CONFIG.SYS file located on the copy of Diskette 1:
       a. At the end of the file, add the appropriate BASEDEV= statement for
          your adapter.  For example, if your .ADD file is named T128SCSI.ADD,
          add the following BASEDEV= statement shown in capital letters:
               set cdrominst=1
               ifs=cdfs.ifs /q
               BASEDEV=T128SCSI.ADD
          The lowercase letters represent lines that already exist in your
          CONFIG.SYS file, and uppercase letters represent lines you need to
          insert.  This ensures proper placement and installation.
          Do not specify a file path for the .ADD file.
       b. Insert the letters REM before any lines in the CONFIG.SYS file that
          refer to the file you deleted in step 2 above.
  4. Begin the installation by inserting the Installation Diskette into drive A
     and restarting the system.  When prompted to insert Diskette 1, insert the
     copy that you modified.
  5. Install OS/2 Version 3, following the instructions in Using Easy
     Installation or Using Advanced Installation
When the installation is complete, you must make changes to the CONFIG.SYS file
located in the root directory of the OS/2 partition in order to make your
CD-ROM accessible.  You must also copy the .ADD that you put on the copy of
Diskette 1 to the \OS2 directory of the OS/2 drive.  The OS/2 Installation
program does not copy unsupported .ADD files automatically.  Do the following
(in the following examples, X represents the OS/2 partition):
  1. Open the OS/2 System folder on the Desktop.
  2. Open Command Prompts.
  3. Open OS/2 Window.
  4. At the command prompt, type cd\os2 and press Enter.
  5. Insert Diskette 1 into drive A.  Then type the following, pressing Enter
     after each:
     COPY A:\OS2CDROM.DMD
     COPY A:\CDFS.IFS
  6. Remove Diskette 1 from drive A and insert the manufacturer-supplied device
     driver diskette (which contains the .ADD file).
  7. Type the following and then press Enter:
     COPY A:\T128SCSI.ADD
     where T128SCSI.ADD represents the name of the device driver file.
  8. Using a system editor, add the lines shown in uppercase letters to the
     CONFIG.SYS file as shown below. (Lowercase letters represent lines that
     already exist in your CONFIG.SYS file; uppercase letters represent lines
     you need to insert.  This ensures proper placement and installation.)
     basedev=ibm1s506.add
     basedev=os2dasd.dmd
     DEVICE=X:\OS2\OS2CDROM.DMD /Q
     IFS=X:\OS2\CDFS.IFS /Q
     set bookshelf=x:\os2\book . . .
     codepage=437,850
     devinfo=kbd,us,x:\os2\keyboard.dcp
     BASEDEV=T128SCSI.ADD
     devinfo=scr,vga,x:\os2\viotbl.dcp
  9. Save the CONFIG.SYS file and exit the editor.
 10. Shut down your system.
The above procedure is not guaranteed to make your CD-ROM work properly because
the device drivers are made by manufacturers other than IBM.  For further
assistance, contact the manufacturer or your CD-ROM drive.
Using an IBM M-Audio Capture and Playback Adapter    316/2

TheM - AudioadaptercanbeconfiguredtoautomaticallyrouteanyaudiosourceattachedtoitsLINE - INjacktotheLINE - OUTjack . ThismightbenecessaryifyourCD - ROMdriveisnotattachedinternallytotheaudiocardoutputs . ToenablethisfeatureoftheM - Audiocard ,addaPtotheendoftheDEVICE =statementforM - AudiointheCONFIG . SYSfile ,asinthefollowingexample : DEVICE=d:\MMOS2\ACPADD2.SYS A P where d represents the drive letter, which will already appear in your CONFIG.SYS file.

Using a Sound Blaster Adapter    317/2

Before you install the Sound Blaster adapter into your computer, you must know the interrupt level, I/O port address, and the DMA channels. These values were shown when you installed the adapter into your computer. If you do not know these values, you can do the following:

  o  On a Micro Channel computer, run the Reference Diskette and look at the
     system configuration.
  o  On an ISA/EISA (non-Micro Channel) computer, check the Dip switches on
     your Sound Blaster.
If your computer has a Token Ring Adapter or a SCSI adapter, you might have
problems if you set Sound Blaster to use I/O port address 220.  Choose a
different address if you have either of these adapters installed.  I/O address
240 is a good choice if 220 cannot be used.
ISA and EISA (non-Micro Channel) computers use Interrupt level 7 for the
printer (LPT) port.  If you have this type of computer with a parallel printer,
choose a different interrupt.
  o  This release of OS/2 does not support MIDI recording.
  o  Sound Blaster (non-SB PRO) does not support software volume control.  The
     MMPM/2 Volume Control application will, therefore, be ineffective for
     these adapters.
  o  If you have an older Sound Blaster (non-SB PRO) card, ensure that you
     upgrade the DSP module to Version 2.0 or higher.  Versions 1.0 and 1.5 are
     not supported by the Sound Blaster device drivers.
Using a Pro AudioSpectrum 16    318/2

The Pro AudioSpectrum 16 is conceptually two sound cards in one adapter. The adapter provides support for the MediaVision Pro AudioSpectrum 16 and the Sound Blaster 2.0. A Yamaha OPL-3 chip is included for FM MIDI synthesis. It is used by the OS/2 device driver for MIDI playback and for MIDI background sound when playing games. The FM MIDI hardware is the same as used in Creative Labs Sound Blaster adapters and is fixed to always respond at a single I/O base address. This commonality of hardware is the reason that multiple Pro AudioSpectrum 16 adapters and multiple Sound Blaster adapters cannot be used in a single computer. The OS/2 physical device driver does not use the Sound Blaster wave audio side of the adapter. This is left free for use by WIN-OS/2 sessions or by games running in DOS sessions. The Pro AudioSpectrum 16 side of the adapter requires one interrupt (IRQ), one Direct Memory Access (DMA) channel, and two I/O addresses. The Sound Blaster side also uses one interrupt (IRQ), one DMA channel, and two I/O addresses. The values for each side of the adapter must be unique just as those selected for other hardware adapters must be unique. I/O addresses 388 and 330 will not be seen in the device driver statement. The Pro AudioSpectrum 16 configurations (DMA and IRQ) are set via software at system startup, based on parameters specified on the DEVICE= line of the CONFIG.SYS file. The values are set by OS/2 Multimedia installation. An example of the DEVICE= line that should appear in your CONFIG.SYS file for the Pro AudioSpectrum 16 device driver follows: DEVICE=D:\MMOS2\MVPRODD.SYS /I:10 /D:5 /S:1,240,1,5 /N:PAS161$ where:

/N:xxxxx  Specifies the name of the driver.
/T:x      /T:1 = use on-board oscillator for OPL-3 (the default is /T:0).
/D:x      Sets the DMA channel.
/Q:x      Sets the IRQ channel.
/I:x      Sets the IRQ channel.
/B:xxx    Specifies HEX base board I/O location (the default is /B:388).
/W:x      If /W:1, enables warm boot reset (the default is /W:0).
/M:x,xxx  MPU [enabled,base address]
/F:x      FM synthesis (/F:1 is enabled by default).
/J:x      /J:1 causes a joystick to be enabled (the default is /J:0).
/S:x,xxx,x,x Sound Blaster [enable,base address,DMA,IRQ]
The Sound Blaster DMA is fixed at DMA channel 1. The I/O base address and IRQ
settings are set differently based on the version of the Pro AudioSpectrum 16
adapter. Older adapters have these values set via jumpers on the card. The
current versions set the Sound Blaster settings via software on the command
line to MVPRODD.SYS (or MVSOUND.SYS for DOS).
As of this release of OS/2, the device driver MVPRODD.SYS does not know how to
set the Sound Blaster IRQ from software. Only the first two parameters of the
/S: parameters are used (enable and I/O location).
Keyboard and Mouse Use    319/1+

The following tables list some of the most common tasks you can do, using either the keyboard or a mouse. The plus (+) sign between key names means to press and hold down the keys in the order shown and release them together. When a column is left blank under the Mouse heading, it means that there is no equivalent mouse function. The keyboard must be used. The following terms are used to describe actions taken with a mouse:

Click         Press and release a mouse button.  Instructions explain whether
              you should click mouse button 1 or 2.
Double-click  Press and release mouse button 1 twice in quick succession.
Drag          Move an object across the computer screen with a mouse.
Open          Point to an item and double-click.  Instructions explain which
              item to point to.
Point         Move the mouse pointer.
Select        Point to an item and click mouse button 1.  Instructions explain
              which item to point to.
Note:  For a detailed list of specific key assignments, see the Master Help
Index.
System Tasks    320/2

ZDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD? 3 TASK 3 KEYS 3 MOUSE 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Get help. 3 F1 3 Select the word HELP. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Restart the system. 3 Ctrl+Alt+Del3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Switch to the next 3 Alt+Tab 3 Select the window. 3 3 window. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Switch to the next 3 Alt+Esc 3 Press both mouse buttons at the same 3 3 window or full-screen 3 3 time; open the window. 3 3 session. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display the Window 3 Ctrl+Esc 3 Point to an empty area on the 3 3 List. 3 3 desktop; click both mouse buttons at 3 3 3 3 the same time. 3 @DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDADDDDDDDDDDDDDADDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDY

Object Tasks    321/2

ZDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD? 3 TASK 3 KEYS 3 MOUSE 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move among objects. 3 , , , or 3 Point to the object. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select an object. 3 Use the arrow keys to 3 Select the object. 3 3 3 move among the objects. 3 3 3 3 Press the Spacebar to 3 3 3 3 select an object. 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select more than one 3 Shift+F8 to begin Add 3 Press and hold the Ctrl 3 3 object. 3 mode. Use the arrow keys 3 key. Select an object. 3 3 3 to move among objects. 3 Repeat as needed. 3 3 3 Press the Spacebar to 3 Release the Ctrl key 3 3 3 make each selection. 3 when done. 3 3 3 Repeat as needed. Press 3 3 3 3 Shift+F8 again to end 3 3 3 3 Add mode. 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select all objects. 3 Press Ctrl+/ 3 Press and hold mouse 3 3 3 3 button 1; then drag the 3 3 3 3 pointer over every 3 3 3 3 object. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Deselect all objects. 3 Press Ctrl+\ 3 Select an empty area on 3 3 3 3 the desktop. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Open an object. 3 Select it; then press 3 Point to the object; 3 3 3 Enter. 3 then double-click. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Delete an object. 3 Select it; then press 3 Point to the object; 3 3 3 Shift+F10. Select 3 then press and hold 3 3 3 DELETE from the 3 down mouse button 2. 3 3 3 pop-up menu. 3 Drag the object to the 3 3 3 3 Shredder object. 3 3 3 3 Release mouse button 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Print an object. 3 Select it; then press 3 Point to the object; 3 3 3 Shift+F10. Select PRINT 3 then press and hold 3 3 3 from the pop-up menu. 3 down mouse button 2. 3 3 3 3 Drag the object to the 3 3 3 3 Printer object. 3 3 3 3 Release mouse button 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move an object. 3 Select it; then press 3 Point to the object; 3 3 3 Shift+F10. Select MOVE 3 then press and hold 3 3 3 from the pop-up menu. 3 down mouse button 2. 3 3 3 3 Drag the object to 3 3 3 3 another folder object. 3 3 3 3 Release mouse button 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Copy an object. 3 Select it; then press 3 Press and hold down the 3 3 3 Shift+F10. Select COPY 3 Ctrl key; then point to 3 3 3 from the pop-up menu. 3 the object. Press and 3 3 3 3 hold down mouse button 3 3 3 3 2. Drag the object to 3 3 3 3 where you want a copy 3 3 3 3 to appear. Release 3 3 3 3 mouse button 2; then 3 3 3 3 release the Ctrl key. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Change the name of an 3 Select the object; then 3 Press and hold down the 3 3 object. 3 press Shift+F10. Press 3 Alt key; select the 3 3 3  ; then press Enter. 3 name (title). Release 3 3 3 Select the GENERAL tab. 3 the Alt key. Edit the 3 3 3 Select the TITLE field; 3 name. Select an area 3 3 3 then edit the name. 3 away from the name. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display the pop-up menu 3 Press Alt+Shift+Tab; 3 Point to an empty area 3 3 for the desktop folder. 3 then press Ctrl+\. Then 3 of the desktop folder; 3 3 3 press Shift+F10. 3 then click mouse button 3 3 3 3 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display the pop-up menu 3 Select it; then press 3 Point to the object; 3 3 for an object. 3 Shift+F10. 3 then click mouse button 3 3 3 3 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select the first choice 3 Home 3 Select the choice. 3 3 in a pop-up menu. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select the last choice 3 End 3 Select the choice. 3 3 in a pop-up menu. 3 3 3 @DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDADDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDADDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDY ZDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDBDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD? 3 TASK 3 KEYS 3 MOUSE 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select a choice using 3 Type the underlined 3 3 3 the underlined letter. 3 letter. 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Get Help. 3 Select and object; then 3 Point to the object; 3 3 3 press F1. 3 then click mouse button 3 3 3 3 2. Select HELP. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move between the object 3 Press Alt+F6. 3 Select the window or 3 3 and the Help window. 3 3 object. 3

Window Tasks    322/2

3 TASK 3 KEYS 3 MOUSE 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Get Help. 3 F1. 3 Select the word HELP; 3 3 3 3 then select the type of 3 3 3 3 help you want. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display the pop-up menu 3 Alt+Spacebar 3 Point to the title-bar 3 3 for a window. 3 3 icon; then click mouse 3 3 3 3 button 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move a window. 3 Alt+F7; then use the 3 Point to the title bar; 3 3 3 arrow keys. 3 then press and hold 3 3 3 3 down mouse button 2. 3 3 3 3 Drag the window to the 3 3 3 3 new location. Release 3 3 3 3 mouse button 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Size a window. 3 Alt+F8; then use the 3 Point to the border; 3 3 3 arrow keys. 3 then press and hold 3 3 3 3 down mouse button 2. 3 3 3 3 Drag the border of the 3 3 3 3 window in any direc- 3 3 3 3 tion. Release mouse 3 3 3 3 button 2. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Set a default size for 3 Press Alt; then press S. 3 Press and hold the 3 3 a window. 3 Use the up, down, left, 3 Shift key; then point 3 3 3 or right cursor keys to 3 to a corner of the 3 3 3 adjust two of the 3 window border. Press 3 3 3 borders; then press 3 and hold mouse button 3 3 3 Enter. 3 1; then drag the border 3 3 3 3 to the desired size. 3 3 3 NOTE: If you press the 3 Release mouse button 1; 3 3 3 mnemonic key for 3 then release the Shift 3 3 3 Hide, Minimize, 3 key. 3 3 3 or Maximize, 3 3 3 3 instead of the S 3 3 3 3 for Size, the 3 3 3 3 selected choice 3 3 3 3 will become the 3 3 3 3 default size of 3 3 3 3 the window. 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Minimize a window. 3 Alt+F9 3 Select the Minimize 3 3 3 3 button. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Hide a window. 3 Alt+F11 3 Select the Hide button. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Maximize a window. 3 Alt+F10 3 Select the Maximize 3 3 3 3 button. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Close a window. 3 Alt+F4 3 Double-click on the 3 3 3 3 title bar icon. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move up through the 3 Page Up or PgUp. 3 Select the area above 3 3 contents of a window, 3 3 the slider box on the 3 3 one page at a time. 3 3 scroll bar. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move down through the 3 Page Down or PgDn. 3 Select the area below 3 3 contents of a window, 3 3 the slider box on the 3 3 one page at a time. 3 3 scroll bar. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move to and from the 3 F10 3 Select the menu bar or 3 3 menu bar. 3 3 the window. 3

Notebook Tasks    323/2

3 TASK 3 KEYS 3 MOUSE 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Get Help 3 F1 3 Select the HELP push 3 3 3 3 button. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move to the next page. 3 Alt+Page Down 3 Select a notebook tab. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move to the previous 3 Alt+Page Up 3 Select a notebook tab. 3 3 page. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move the cursor from 3 Alt+Up Arrow 3 Select a notebook tab. 3 3 the notebook page to a 3 3 3 3 tab. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move the cursor from a 3 Alt+Down Arrow 3 Select the notebook 3 3 tab to the notebook 3 3 page. 3 3 page. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move to the next field. 3 Tab 3 Select the field. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move to the next item 3 Up, Down, Left, or Right 3 3 3 within a field. 3 Arrow 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select an item in a 3 Enter 3 Select the item. 3 3 single selection field. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select an item in a 3 Spacebar 3 Select the button or 3 3 multiple selection 3 3 box next to the item. 3 3 field. 3 3 3

Help Window Tasks    324/2

These tasks only work from within a help window.

3 TASK 3 KEYS 3 MOUSE 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Switch between a help 3 Alt+F6 3 Select the window. 3 3 window and the object 3 3 3 3 or window for which 3 3 3 3 help was displayed. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display General help. 3 F2 3 Select HELP; then 3 3 3 3 select GENERAL HELP. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display Keys help. 3 F9 3 Select HELP; then 3 3 3 3 select KEYS HELP. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display Help index. 3 F11 or Shift+F1 3 Select HELP; then 3 3 3 3 select to HELP INDEX. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display Using help. 3 Shift+F10 3 Select HELP; then 3 3 3 3 select USING HELP. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display help for a 3 Use Tab to move the 3 Double-click on the 3 3 highlighted word or 3 cursor to the high- 3 highlighted word or 3 3 phrase. 3 lighted word or phrase; 3 phrase. 3 3 3 then press Enter. 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display the previous 3 Esc 3 Select the PREVIOUS 3 3 help window. 3 3 push button. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Search for a word or 3 Ctrl+S 3 Select SERVICES; then 3 3 phrase 3 3 select SEARCH. 3

Master Help Index Tasks    325/2

3 TASK 3 KEYS 3 MOUSE 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Open the Master Help 3 Enter 3 Double-click on the 3 3 Index. 3 3 Master Help Index. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move through the 3 3 Select the topic. 3 3 topics, one line at a 3 3 3 3 time. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Select the area above 3 3 3 3 the slider box on the 3 3 3 3 scroll bar. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move down through the 3 Page Down or PgDn. 3 Select the area below 3 3 topics, one page at a 3 3 the slider box on the 3 3 time. 3 3 scroll bar. 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move up through the 3 Page Up or PgUp. 3 3 3 topics, one page at a 3 3 3 3 time. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Move to the topics 3 Type the letter of the 3 Select the letter of 3 3 beginning with a 3 alphabet 3 the alphabet. 3 3 letter. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Switch between an entry 3 Alt+F6 3 Select the window. 3 3 and the Master Help 3 3 3 3 Index. 3 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Display related infor- 3 Use Tab to move the 3 Double-click on an 3 3 mation. 3 cursor to the entry 3 entry listed under 3 3 3 listed under related 3 related information. 3 3 3 information; then press 3 3 3 3 Enter. 3 3 CDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDEDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD4 3 Return to the previous 3 Esc 3 Select the PREVIOUS 3 3 help window. 3 3 push button. 3

Notices    326/1+

References in this publication to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that IBM intends to make these available in all countries in which IBM operates. Any reference to an IBM product, program or service is not intended to state or imply that only IBM's product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not infringe any of IBM's intellectual property rights or other legally protectable rights may be used instead of the IBM product, program, or service. Evaluation and verification of operation in conjunction with other products, programs, or services, except those expressly designated by IBM, are the user's responsibility. IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to the IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, 500 Columbus Avenue, Thornwood NY 10594, U.S.A.

Trademarks    327/2

The following terms, denoted by an asterisk (*) in this publication, are trademarks or service marks of the IBM Corporation in the United States or other countries:

AT                          IBM
IBMLink                     Micro Channel
Operating System/2          OS/2
PC/XT                       Personal System/2
Presentation Manager        Proprinter
PS/2                        Screen Reader
ThinkPad                    ValuePoint
WIN-OS/2                    Workplace Shell
XGA                         XT
The following terms, denoted by a double asterisk (**) in this publication, are
trademarks of other companies as follows:
Trademark                Owner
Adaptec                  Adaptec, Inc.
Adobe                    Adobe Systems Incorporated
Adobe Type Manager       Adobe Systems Incorporated
After Dark               Berkely Systems, Inc.
Allways                  Funk Software, Inc.
ALR                      Advanced Logic Research, Inc.
AMI                      American Megatrends, Inc.
Aox                      Aox Corporation
APM                      Astek International
ATI                      ATI Technologies, Inc.
Borland C++              Borland International, Inc.
Bubble-Jet               Canon, Inc.
Canon                    Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Central Point Anti-Virus Central Point Software, Inc.
Central Point Backup     Central Point Software, Inc.
Cirrus Logic             Cirrus Logic, Inc.
Compaq                   Compaq Computer Corporation
CompuServe               CompuServe Incorporated
Echo                     Echo Speech Corporation
Everex                   Everex Systems, Inc.
Flexview                 Nutmeg Systems
Freelance                Lotus Development Corporation
Future Domain            Future Domain Corporation
Gateway 2000             Gateway 2000, Inc.
Graphics Ultra Pro       ATI Technologies, Inc.
Helvetica                Linotype Company
Hewlett-Packard          Hewlett-Packard Company
Hitachi                  Hitachi Ltd.
HP                       Hewlett-Packard Company
Intel                    Intel Corporation
IOMEGA                   IOMEGA Inc.
LaserJet                 Hewlett-Packard Company
Leading Technology       Leading Technology, Inc.
Legend                   Sigma Designs Inc.
Logitech                 Logitech, Inc.
Lotus                    Lotus Development Corporation
McAfee                   McAfee Associates
Media Vision             Media Vision, Inc.
Micronics                Micronics Electronics, Inc.
Microsoft                Microsoft Corporation
Mitsumi                  Mitsumi Denki Kabushki Kaisha
Motherboard Factory      Motherboard Factory
Mylex                    Mylex Corporation
NetWare                  Novell, Inc.
Nomad                    Gateway 2000, Inc.
Northgate                Northgate Computer Systems
Orchid                   Orchid Technology Inc.
Panasonic                Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.
PCMCIA                   Personal Computer Memory Card International
                         Association
Philips                  Philips Electronics N.V.
Phoenix                  Phoenix Technologies, Ltd.
PostScript               Adobe Systems Incorporated
Pro AudioSpectrum        Media Vision, Inc.
ProComm                  Datastorm Technologies, Inc.
Quantum                  Quantum Corporation
Reveal                   Reveal Computer Products, Inc.
SlimLine                 Northgate Computer Systems
Sony                     Sony Corporation
Sound Blaster            Creative Labs, Inc.
Stacker                  Stac Electronics
S3                       S3 Incorporated
Times New Roman          Monotype Corporation, Limited
Trident                  Trident Microsystems, Incorporated
Toshiba                  Toshiba Corporation
Tseng                    Tseng Laboratories Inc.
Ventura Publisher        Ventura Software, Inc.
VESA                     Video Electronics Standards Association
Video 7                  Video Seven, Inc.
Weitek                   Weitek Corporation
Western Digital          Western Digital Corporation
Windows                  Microsoft Corporation
WordPerfect              WordPerfect Corporation
Zenith Data Systems      Zenith Electronics Corporation
ZEOS                     ZEOS International Ltd.
1-2-3                    Lotus Development Corporation

Glossary 328/1+

A    329/2+


archive    330/3

archive (1) A flag of files and directories that OS/2 uses to determine which files are new or modified. Files with this flag are included when a backup copy is made or when all the files are restored on a hard disk. (2) A copy of one or more files or a copy of a database that is saved for future reference or for recovery purposes in case the original data is damaged or lost.

attribute    331/3

attribute A characteristic or property of a file, directory, or object; for example, its size, last modification date, or flag. See also setting.

audio    332/3

audio Pertaining to the portion of recorded information that can be heard.

AUTOEXEC.BAT    333/3

AUTOEXEC.BAT A batch file whose main purpose is to process commands that set up the operating system for DOS sessions.

audio    334/3

audio Pertaining to the portion of recorded information that can be heard.

audio processing    335/3

audio processing In multimedia applications, manipulating digital audio; for example, by editing or creating special effects.

audio segment    336/3

audio segment A contiguous set of recorded data from an audio track. An audio segment might or might not be associated with a video segment.

audio track    337/3

audio track (1) The audio portion of a program. (2) The physical location where the audio is placed beside the image. (A system with two audio tracks can have either stereo sound or two independent audio tracks.) (3) Synonymous with sound track&per.

AudioVisual Connection (AVC)    338/3

AudioVisual Connection (AVC) An IBM product that enables a user to develop and deliver professional-quality audio-visual shows on a PS/2 computer.

authoring    339/3

authoring A structured approach to combining all the media elements in an interactive production, assisted by computer software designed for this purpose.

authoring system    340/3

authoring system The software tools necessary to integrate computers and peripherals, such as CD-ROMs and laser videodiscs.

B    341/2+


background    342/3

background In multiprogramming, the conditions under which low-priority programs run when high-priority programs are not using the system resources. A background session runs one program step at a time. It does not run interactively with the user; processing continues on other sessions in the foreground.

back up    343/3

back up To copy information onto a diskette or hard disk for record keeping or recovery purposes.

batch file    344/3

batch file A file that contains a series of commands to be processed sequentially. A batch file can have either a CMD or a BAT extension.

baud rate    345/3

baud rate A number representing the speed at which information travels over a communication line. The higher the number, the faster communication occurs.

bit map    346/3

bit map A representation of an image by an array of bits.

bookmark    347/3

bookmark A menu choice in online books that is used to save your place in the document that you are viewing, by marking the topic that is displayed.

border    348/3

border A visual indicator of a window's boundaries.

button    349/3

button A mechanism on a pointing device, such as a mouse, or an area on the computer screen, used to request or initiate an action. See also maximize button, hide button, push button, radio button, and restore button.

byte    350/3

byte A group of eight adjacent binary digits that are treated as a unit, and that often represent a character.

C    351/2+


cache    352/3

cache A storage buffer that contains frequently accessed instructions and data; it is used to reduce hard disk access time.

cascade    353/3

cascade A choice in a menu that arranges the secondary windows so that each window is offset on two sides from the window it overlaps. The windows appear to be stacked, one behind the other.

cascading choice    354/3

cascading choice A menu choice that has an arrow to the right of it. If this arrow is selected, a cascaded menu appears. A three-dimensional arrow indicates that a cascaded choice is preselected and is the default action when you select the main choice.

A one-dimensional arrow indicates that additional choices are available;

however, there is no default action. See also cascaded menu.

cascaded menu    355/3

cascaded menu A menu that appears when the arrow to the right of a cascading choice is selected. It contains a set of choices that are related to the cascading choice. Cascaded menus are used to reduce the length of a menu.

case-sensitive    356/3

case-sensitive A condition in which entries for an entry field must conform to a specific lowercase, uppercase, or mixed-case format in order to be valid.

CD-ROM    357/3

CD-ROM High capacity, read-only memory in the form of an optically read compact disc. See also compact disc.

character    358/3

character A letter, digit, or other symbol that is used as part of the organization, control, or representation of data.

check box    359/3

check box A square box with associated text that represents one choice in a set of multiple choices. When you select a choice, a check mark appears in the check box to indicate that the choice is in effect. You can clear the check box by selecting the choice again. Contrast with radio button.

check mark    360/3

check mark A symbol that shows that a choice is currently active. This symbol is used in menus and check boxes. See also checkbox.

chip set    361/3

chip set An integrated circuit or a set of integrated circuits which provide hardware support for a related set of functions, such as generation of video.

choice    362/3

choice Any item that you can select. A choice can appear in a selection field, in a menu, or in text (a list of selectable choices), or it might be represented by an icon.

circular slider control    363/3

circular slider control A knob-like control that performs like a control on a TV or stereo.

click    364/3

click To press and release the select button on a pointing device without moving the pointer off the choice. See also double-click.

clip    365/3

clip A section of recorded, filmed, or videotaped material.

clipboard    366/3

clipboard An area of memory that temporarily holds data being passed from one program to another. Data is placed on the clipboard by selecting from a menu.

close    367/3

close A choice in Window List and in those programs that have a system menu. This is also a cascading choice from the Windows choice on a pop-up menu. This choice ends highlighted programs and objects and their associated windows.

command prompt    368/3

command prompt A displayed symbol that indicates where you enter commands.

compact disc    369/3

compact disc A disc, usually 4.75 inches in diameter, from which data is read optically by means of a laser.

CONFIG.SYS    370/3

CONFIG.SYS A file that the operating system adds to the root directory during installation. This file contains statements that set up the system configuration each time you restart the operating system.

configuration    371/3

configuration (1) The manner in which hardware and software of an information processing system are organized and interconnected. (2) The arrangement and relationship of the components in a system or network.

configure    372/3

configure To describe to a system the devices, optional features, and programs installed on the system.

container    373/3

container An object that holds other objects. A folder is an example of a container object.

copy    374/3

copy (1) A reproduction of an original. (2) To make a reproduction of an object in a new location. After the copy action, the original object remains in the original location and a duplicate exists in the new location. A menu choice that places onto the clipboard a copy of what you have selected. This choice is also used to make copies of objects from a pop-up menu.

cut    375/3

cut A choice in a menu of a program that removes a selected object, or a part of an object, to the clipboard, usually compressing the space it occupied in a window. Removes a selected object or a part of an object to the clipboard, usually compressing the space it occupied in a window.

D    376/2+


data    377/3

data The coded representation of information for use in a computer. Data has certain attributes such as type and length.

database    378/3

database A collection of data with a given structure for accepting, storing, and providing, on demand, data for multiple users.

data-file object    379/3

data-file object An object that represents a file in the file system. The primary purpose is to convey information, such as text, graphics, audio, or video. A letter or spreadsheet is an example of data-file objects.

default    380/3

default A value, attribute, or option that is assumed when another is not explicitly specified.

default action    381/3

default action An action that is performed when you press Enter while pointing at an object, double-click the selection button on an object, or perform a direct-manipulation operation. The default action is intended to be the action that you would most likely want in the given situation.

default choice    382/3

default choice A selected choice that a program provides for the initial appearance of a group of selection choices.

deselect    383/3

deselect The process of removing selection highlighting from one or more choices. Contrast with select.

desktop    384/3

desktop A folder that fills the entire screen and holds all of the objects that enable you to interact with and perform operations on the system.

device driver    385/3

device driver A program that contains the code needed to attach and use a device, such as a display, plotter, printer, or mouse. The driver might also include data such as help information.

device font    386/3

device font A font particular to, and loaded in the memory of a device such as a video display or printer. Some device fonts have size and language-support restrictions.

device object    387/3

device object An object that provides a means of communication between a computer and another piece of equipment, such as a printer or disk drive. See also printer object.

digital    388/3

digital Pertaining to data in the form of numeric characters.

digital audio    389/3

digital audio Audible information that has been converted to and stored in digital form.

digital video    390/3

digital video Visual material that has been converted to digital form.

direct manipulation    391/3

direct manipulation The action of using a mouse or another pointing device to work with objects, rather than through menus. For example, changing the size of a window by dragging one of its edges is direct manipulation. Moving or printing an object by dragging it to the printer is another example. See also drag.

directory    392/3

directory (1) A list of the files that are stored on a disk or diskette. A directory also contains information about the file such as size and date of last change. (2) A named grouping of files in a file system. See also folder.

directory tree    393/3

directory tree An outline of all the directories and subdirectories on the current drive.

disk    394/3

disk A round, flat, data medium that is rotated in order to read or write data. See also compact disc, hard disk, and diskette.

diskette    395/3

diskette A removable magnetic disk enclosed in a protective cover used to store information. See also diskette drive.

diskette drive    396/3

diskette drive A mechanism used to seek, read, and write data on diskettes.

DOS command prompt    397/3

DOS command prompt A displayed symbol that indicates where you enter commands. The DOS command prompt is displayed in a DOS window or DOS full screen. Contrast with OS/2 command prompt.

DOS session    398/3

DOS session A session created by the OS/2 operating system that supports the independent execution of a DOS program. The DOS program appears to run independent of any other programs in the system.

double-click    399/3

double-click To press and release the select button on a pointing device twice in rapid succession while the pointer is over the intended target of the operation. See also click.

downloaded font    400/3

downloaded font A soft font copied (downloaded) to the memory of a printer.

drag    401/3

drag To use a mouse or another pointing device to move an object. The following are examples: (1) pointing to an object; then pressing and holding mouse button 2 while moving to a new location, or (2) pointing to a window border; then holding down mouse button 1 or 2 while moving the border to change the size of the window. Dragging ends when the mouse button is released.

dynamic data exchange    402/3

dynamic data exchange The exchange of data between programs or between a program and a data-file object. Any change you make to information in one program or session is applied to the identical data created by the other program. For example, with the dynamic data exchange (DDE) feature enabled, you can select the duplicate of a spreadsheet that is embedded in a report. Then, if you make changes to the spreadsheet copy in the report, the same changes are made to the original spreadsheet file.

E    403/2+


enable    404/3

enable (1) To make functional. (2) The state of a processing unit that allows the occurrence of certain types of interruptions. (3) To initiate the operation of a circuit or device.

environment variables    405/3

environment variables A series of commands placed in the AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files that dictate the way the operating system is going to run and what external devices it is going to recognize. These commands also can be specified as settings of DOS programs.

extended attributes    406/3

extended attributes Additional information that the system or a program associates with a file. An extended attribute can be any format, for example text, a bit map, or binary data.

F    407/2+


field    408/3

field An identifiable area in a window used to contain data. Examples of fields are: an entry field, into which you can type text; and a field of radio buttons, from which you can select one choice.

file    409/3

file A collection of related data that is stored and retrieved by an assigned name. For example, a file can include information that starts a program, program-file object, can contain text or graphics data-file object, or can process a series of commands such as a batch file.

file allocation table (FAT)    410/3

file allocation table (FAT) A table used by DOS to allocate disk space for a file. It also locates and chains together parts of the file that may be scattered on different sectors so that the file can be used in a random or sequential manner. Contrast with High Performance File System (HPFS).

file name    411/3

file name (1) The name used by a program to identify a file. (2) When referring to the file allocation table (FAT) file system, the file name is the portion of the identifying name that precedes the extension. When referring to the high performance file system (HPFS), the file name includes an extension (if there is one). If you are using the HPFS, the file name can be up to 254 characters and can include any number of periods. The following is an example of a path and file name in the HPFS file system where C: is the drive, the first \ is the root, INCOME is the directory, and SALES.FIGURES.SEPTEMBER is the file name:

   C:\INCOME\SALES.FIGURES.SEPTEMBER

If you are using the FAT file system, the file name can be up to eight characters and can be followed by an optional three-character extension. The following is an example of a path and file name in the FAT file system where C: is the drive, the first \ is the root, INCOME is the directory, TAX is a subdirectory, and SALES.TXT is the file name and extension:

   C:\INCOME\TAX\SALES.TXT
flag    412/3

flag A characteristic of a file or directory that enables it to be used in certain ways. See also archive, hidden, read-only, and system.

folder    413/3

folder A container used to organize objects, programs, documents, other folders, or any combination of these. The folders on the desktop represent the directories in the file system. For example, a folder can have other folders within it. This is similar to a subdirectory within a directory.

font    414/3

font A particular style (shape), size, slant, and weight, defined for an entire character set; for example, 9-point Helvetica italic bold. When applied to outline or scalable character sets, which can be scaled to any size, font refers to style, slant, and weight, but not to size.

foreground    415/3

foreground In multiprogramming, the environment in which interactive high-priority programs run. These programs run interactively with the user.

format    416/3

format To check a hard disk or diskette for defects and prepare it to hold information.

Format 0 MIDI file    417/3

Format 0 MIDI file All MIDI data is stored on a single track.

Format 1 MIDI file    418/3

Format 1 MIDI file All MIDI data is stored on multiple tracks.

H    419/2+


hard disk    420/3

hard disk A rigid disk in a hard disk drive that you cannot remove. The hard disk can be partitioned into storage areas of variable sizes that are subdivided into directories and subdirectories. See also partition.

Help    421/3

Help A choice on a pop-up menu that gives you assistance and information; for example, general help about the purpose of the object. (This information is the same as highlighting the choice and pressing F1.) If you select the arrow to the right of Help, a cascaded menu appears from which you can request further help. The Help choice also can appear in those programs that have a menu bar.

Help Index    422/3

Help Index A choice in the Help cascaded menu that presents an alphabetic listing of help topics for an object. The Help index choice also can appear in those programs that have Help on a menu bar.

Help push button    423/3

Help push button A push button that, when selected, provides information about the item the cursor is on or about the entire window.

hidden    424/3

hidden A flag that indicates that a file or directory should not be displayed in the directory tree or the directory window.

hide    425/3

hide To remove a window from the desktop. Hidden windows are displayed in the Window List.

hide button    426/3

hide button A small button located in the right-hand corner of the title bar of a window that, when selected, removes all of the windows associated with that window from the screen and are displayed in the Window List.

highlighting    427/3

highlighting Emphasizing a display element or segment by modifying its visual attributes.

high performance file system (HPFS)    428/3

high performance file system (HPFS) An installable file system that uses high-speed buffer storage, known as a cache, to provide fast access to large disk volumes. The file system also supports the coexistence of multiple, active file systems on a single personal computer, with the capability of multiple and different storage devices. File names used with HPFS can have as many as 254 characters.

I    429/2+


icon    430/3

icon A graphical representation of an object, consisting of an image, image background, and a label.

image file    431/3

image file A file that is created from a DOS startup diskette. The image file is a copy of the information on the startup diskette. Just as a DOS session can be started from a DOS startup diskette, a DOS session can be started from an image file of that same diskette.

inactive window    432/3

inactive window A window you are not currently interacting with. This window cannot receive input from the mouse or keyboard. Contrast with active window.

install    433/3

install (1) To physically copy the files from the shipped diskettes of an operating system or program to specified areas (directories) of a hard disk. (2) Installing a printer driver, queue driver, or port means adding the driver to the INI file (and copying to the hard disk only if required). Deleting a printer driver, queue driver, or port removes the entry from the INI file, but leaves the program file on your hard disk.

interrupt request (IRQ)    434/3

interrupt request (IRQ) A request for processing on a particular priority level. It may be generated by the active program, the processing unit, or an I/O device.

IRQ    435/3

IRQ See interrupt request (IRQ).

J    436/2+


job    437/3

job A data file sent to a printer to be printed.

K    438/2+


kernel    439/3

kernel (1) The part of an operating system that performs basic functions such as allocating hardware resources. (2) A part of a program that must be in main storage in order to load other parts of the program.

keys help    440/3

keys help A choice in the Help cascaded menu that presents a listing of all the key assignments for an object or a product. This choice also can appear in those programs that have Help on a menu bar.

kilobyte (KB)    441/3

kilobyte (KB) A term meaning 1024 bytes.

L    442/2+


LAN    443/3

LAN Local Area Network. (1) Two or more computing units connected for local resource sharing. (2) A network in which communications are limited to a moderate-sized geographic area, such as a single office building, warehouse, or campus, and that do not extend across public rights-of-way.

list box    444/3

list box A vertical, scrollable list of objects or settings choices that you can select.

log in    445/3

log in (1) To begin a session with a remote resource (2) The act of identifying yourself as authorized to use the resource. Often, the system requires a user ID and password to check your authorization to use the resource.

log out    446/3

log out (1) To end a session or request that a session be ended. (2) The act of removing access to a remote resource from a workstation. Contrast with log in.

M    447/2+


M-Audio Capture and Playback Adapter (M-ACPA)    448/3

M-Audio Capture and Playback Adapter (M-ACPA) An adapter card (for use with the IBM PS/2 product line) that provides the ability to record and play back high quality sound. The adapter converts the audio input (analog) signals to a digital format that is compressed and stored for later use.

mark    449/3

mark A menu choice of a program that you select to highlight text or graphics that you want to perform clipboard operations on. The clipboard operations are cut, copy, paste, clear, and delete.

Master Help Index    450/3

Master Help Index An object on the desktop that, when selected, presents an alphabetic listing of operating system tasks and topics.

maximize    451/3

maximize A menu choice available from the Windows choice on a pop-up menu. Select this choice to enlarge the window to its largest possible size.

maximize button    452/3

maximize button A large, square button located in the rightmost corner of the title bar of a window that, when selected, enlarges the window to its largest possible size. Contrast with hide button. See also restore button.

megabyte (MB)    453/3

megabyte (MB) A term meaning approximately 1000000 bytes.

memory    454/3

memory (1) The storage on electronic chips; for example, random access memory, where your programs and data are held while you use them, or read-only memory where information is stored that your system can refer to but not change. (2) Program-addressable storage; the locations by which the operating system and your programs can locate information that is temporarily held in memory. With the OS/2 operating system, program-addressable memory might be larger than the electronic chip memory in your computer.

menu    455/3

menu A displayed list of available items from which you can make a selection. See also popup menu.

menu bar    456/3

menu bar The area near the top of the window, below the title bar and above the rest of the window, that contains choices that provide access to other menus.

MIDI    457/3

MIDI Musical Instrument Digital Interface.

MIDI Mapper    458/3

MIDI Mapper Provides the ability to translate and redirect MIDI messages to achieve device-independent playback of MIDI sequences.

migrate    459/3

migrate (1) To move to a changed operating environment, usually to a new release or version of a system. (2) To move data from one hierarchy of storage to another.

minimize    460/3

minimize To remove a window (using the minimize button) to one of the following:

  o  Minimized Window Viewer
  o  Window List
  o  Desktop Folder.
See also hide.
minimize button    461/3

minimize button A button, located next to the rightmost button in a title bar, that when selected, reduces the window to its smallest possible size and removes all of the windows associated with that window from the screen. Contrast with maximize button and hide button.

Minimized Window Viewer    462/3

Minimized Window Viewer A folder that contains icons of minimized windows. See also minimize button and minimize.

mix    463/3

mix The combining of audio or video sources during postproduction.

mixer    464/3

mixer A device used to simultaneously combine and blend several inputs into one or two outputs.

modem    465/3

modem A device that converts digital data from a computer to an analog signal that can be transmitted on a telecommunications line and that converts the received signal to data for the computer.

mouse    466/3

mouse A pointing device that you move on a flat surface to position a pointer on the screen. It allows you to select a choice or function to be performed or to perform operations on the screen, such as dragging or drawing lines from one position to another.

mouse button    467/3

mouse button A mechanism on a mouse that you press to select choices or initiate actions.

move    468/3

move To change the location of an object. After the move action, the original exists in its new location and no longer exists in its original location. Contrast with copy.

Move    469/3

Move A choice on the pop-up menu of objects that you select to move the objects to other containers. Select to position a window on the screen.

multimedia    470/3

multimedia (1) The combination of different elements of media (for example, text, graphics, audio, and still images) for display and control from a personal computer. (2) Material presented in a combination of text, graphics, video, image, animation, and sound.

multimedia system    471/3

multimedia system A system capable of presenting multiple types and formats of material in their entirety.

multiple DOS sessions    472/3

multiple DOS sessions A system service that coordinates the concurrent operation of separate DOS sessions.

multiple virtual DOS machines    473/3

multiple virtual DOS machines

See multiple DOS sessions.

multitasking    474/3

multitasking A mode of operation that provides for concurrent performance, or interleaved execution of two or more tasks.

Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI)    475/3

Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) A protocol that enables a synthesizer to send signals to another synthesizer or to a computer, or enables a computer to send signals to a musical instrument or to another computer.

N    476/2+


network    477/3

network A configuration of data-processing devices and software connected for the purpose of sharing resources and for information interchange. See also LAN.

network administrator    478/3

network administrator The person responsible for the installation, management, and control of a network. The network administrator gives authorization to you for accessing shared resources and determines the type of access those users can have.

network group    479/3

network group A folder representing a Local Area Network or a group of objects that you have permission to access.

notebook    480/3

notebook A graphical representation that resembles a bound notebook that contains pages separated into sections by tabbed divider-pages. It contains a mechanism that you can use to turn the pages. For example, you can select a tab to turn the page to the section identified by the tab label.

O    481/2+


object    482/3

object Something that you work with to perform a task. Text and graphics are examples of objects. See also data-file object, folder, program object and device object.

open    483/3

open To create a file or make an existing file available for processing or use.

operating system    484/3

operating system Software that controls the processing of programs and that may provide services such as resource allocation, scheduling, input/output control, and data management. Although operating systems are predominantly software, partial hardware implementations are possible.

OS/2 command prompt    485/3

OS/2 command prompt A displayed symbol that indicates where you enter commands. The OS/2 command prompt is displayed in an OS/2 window or OS/2 full screen. Contrast with DOS command prompt.

P    486/2+


parallel    487/3

parallel Pertaining to the simultaneous transmission of individual parts of a whole. When a printer is connected to a parallel port, it receives an entire byte (character) at a time. See also serial.

parameter    488/3

parameter A variable used in conjunction with a command to affect its result.

parity check    489/3

parity check A mathematical operation on the numerical representation of the information communicated between two pieces. For example, if parity is odd, any character represented by an even number has a bit added to it, making it odd, and an information receiver checks that each unit of information has an odd value.

PARSEDB    490/3

PARSEDB A utility program that creates a similar database to the Migrate Applications default database (DATABASE.DAT). The Migrate Applications program uses information in this database when migrating programs. The database you create with PARSEDB contains similar information to the default database, but for different programs.

partition    491/3

partition A fixed-size division of storage. On a personal computer hard disk, one of four possible storage areas of variable size; one might be accessed by DOS, and each of the others might be assigned to another operating system.

password    492/3

password A string of characters that you, a program, or a computer operator must specify to meet security requirements before gaining access to a system and to the information stored within it.

paste    493/3

paste (1) A choice in the menu of a program that, when selected, moves the contents of the clipboard into a preselected location that you can select in a window. (2)Move the contents of the clipboard into a preselected location that you can select in a window.

path    494/3

path A statement that indicates where a file is stored on a particular drive. The path consists of all the directories that must be opened to get to a particular file. The directory names are separated by the backslash (\). The first backslash represents the root directory. For example, a file named things that is located in the EDIT directory of drive C has a path of:

    c:\edit\things

A path is sometimes followed by a file name and a file name extension (if there is one). It is sometimes preceded by a drive letter and a colon (:).

path and file name    495/3

path and file name The path and file name make up a statement that indicates where a file is stored in a particular drive. It consists of all the directories that must be opened to get to a particular file. The backslash (\) separates directory names and the file name; the first \ indicates the root. File names in the HPFS file system can be up to 254 characters and can include any number of periods. The following is an example: \INCOME\SALES.FIGURES.FOR.SEPTEMBER File names in the FAT file system can be up to eight characters and can be followed by an optional three-character extension. The following is an example: \INCOME\TAX\SALES.TXT

plotter    496/3

plotter An output device that uses multiple pens to draw on paper or transparencies.

pointer    497/3

pointer The symbol displayed on the screen that you move with a pointing device, such as a mouse.

pop-up menu    498/3

pop-up menu A menu that, when requested, is displayed next to the object it is associated with. It contains choices appropriate for a given object or set of objects in their current context. The menu is displayed by clicking mouse button 2 on an object or on the desktop.

pop-up window    499/3

pop-up window A movable window, fixed in size, in which you provide information required by an application so that the application can continue to process your request.

port    500/3

port A connector on a computer to which cables for devices, such as display stations and printers, or communications lines are attached. Ports can be parallel or serial.

port designation    501/3

port designation A 4-character identifier (such as LPT1 or COM1) assigned to a printer, plotter, or communications device so that the system has a unique way to refer to the resource.

printer driver    502/3

printer driver A file that describes the physical characteristics of a printer, plotter, or other peripheral device, and is used to convert graphics into device-specific data at the time of printing or plotting. A Presentation Manager printer driver allows you to print or plot from an application program that creates printer-independent files.

printer-independent file    503/3

printer-independent file A file in a format that is independent of a particular printer type. For example, with a Presentation Manager spooler, a file in the metafile format is printer-independent. See also printer-specific file.

printer object    504/3

printer object An object representing a physical printer or plotter, its printer driver, queue, and other settings. See also device object.

printer-specific file    505/3

printer-specific file A file that can be printed on only one type of printer. See also printer-independent file.

private    506/3

private When the WIN_CLIPBOARD setting is set to Off, this disables (makes private) the sharing of clipboard information among DOS, OS/2 and Windows programs. When the WIN_DDE (dynamic data exchange) setting is set to Off, this disables (makes private) the sharing of data among OS/2 and Windows programs.

program    507/3

program A sequence of instructions that a computer can interpret and process.

program-file object    508/3

program-file object An object that starts a program. Program files commonly have extensions of &per.EXE, .COM, .CMD, or .BAT. Contrast with data-file object.

program object    509/3

program object An object representing the file that starts a program. You can change the settings for this object to specify how you want the program to start or where the files related to the program are stored. For example, you can specify that an editor always starts with the NOTABS option. See also program-file object.

program title    510/3

program title A name that you type for a selected program. It is displayed with the icon. It can be any name you want to use to refer to the program. For example, My Favorite Editor could be used as the program title for an editor whose actual title is ABC.

program type    511/3

program type See session.

property    512/3

property (1) Synonym for setting. (2) Like a setting, but used by the OS/2 operating system to refer to printer, plotter, or print job set up.

public    513/3

public When the WIN_CLIPBOARD setting is set to On, this enables (makes public) the sharing of clipboard information among DOS, OS/2, and Windows programs. When the WIN_DDE (dynamic data exchange) setting set to On, this enables (makes public) the sharing of data among OS/2 and Windows programs.

push button    514/3

push button A rounded-corner rectangular control containing text or graphics, or both. Push buttons are used in windows for actions that occur immediately when the push button is selected.

Q    515/2+


queue    516/3

queue A line or list formed by items waiting to be processed; for example, a list of print jobs waiting to be printed. See also spooling and spooler.

queue driver    517/3

queue driver A software processor that takes a print job from a queue, and sends it to the appropriate printer driver to prepare it for printing.

R    518/2+


radio button    519/3

radio button A round button on the screen with text beside it. Radio buttons are combined to show you a fixed set of choices from which only one can be selected. The circle is partially filled when a choice is selected. Contrast with check box.

read-only    520/3

read-only A flag that prevents a file from being modified. The file with this flag set can be viewed, copied, or printed.

refresh    521/3

refresh An action that updates changed information to its current status.

remote    522/3

remote Pertaining to a system, program, or device that is accessed through a telecommunication line.

resolution    523/3

resolution (1) Density or sharpness of an image. For bit-map material, resolution is expressed in dots-per-inch, with higher quality output having more dots-per-inch. Resolution can be adjusted for some printers. Low-resolution images are printed faster, but appear coarser than high-resolution images. A printer's memory size can limit the resolution you can choose. (2) The number of lines in an image that an imaging system (for example, a telescope, the human eye, or a camera) can resolve. Higher resolution makes text and graphics appear clearer.

resource    524/3

resource Any facility of a computing system or operating system needed to perform required operations; includes disk storage, input devices, output devices (such as printers), a processing unit, data files, and programs.

restore button    525/3

restore button A button that appears in the rightmost corner of the title bar after a window has been maximized. When the restore button is selected, the window returns to the size it was before it was maximized. See also maximize button and hide button.

root directory    526/3

root directory The first directory on a drive in which all other files and subdirectories exist, such as C:\.

S    527/2+


scroll    528/3

scroll To move a display image vertically or horizontally to view data that is not otherwise visible in a display screen or window.

scroll bar    529/3

scroll bar A part of a window, associated with a scrollable area, that you interact with to see information that is not currently visible. Scroll bars can be displayed vertically and horizontally. The scroll bar can be selected only with a mouse.

select    530/3

select To use the selection button to highlight or choose an item such as an object or a menu choice. When you make a selection, there is a subsequent action that will apply. Contrast with deselect.

serial    531/3

serial Pertaining to the sequential transmission of one element at a time. Serial ports pass one bit at a time. If a port has word length 7, it must pass seven separate elements before the receiver can assemble those elements into a single recognizable whole unit (character). See also parallel.

server    532/3

server (1) On a local area network (LAN), a workstation that provides facilities to other workstations. (2) A computer that shares its resources with other computers on a network. An example of a server is a file server, a print server, or a mail server.

session    533/3

session (1) A logical connection between two machines on a network. (2) One instance of a started program or command prompt. Each session is separate from all other sessions that might be running on the computer. The operating system is responsible for coordinating the resources that each session uses, such as computer memory, allocation of processor time, and windows on the screen. The session types are OS/2 window, OS/2 full screen, DOS window, DOS full screen, WIN-OS/2 full screen, WIN-OS/2 window, and WIN-OS/2 window separate session.

setting    534/3

setting A unique characteristic of an object that can be changed or modified. The setting of an object describes the object. The name of the object is an example of a setting.

Settings    535/3

Settings A choice that defines characteristics of objects or displays identifying characteristics of objects.

shadow    536/3

shadow A link between duplicate objects. The objects can be located in different folders. If you make a change in either the duplicate or the original, the change takes effect in the other as well. Or, suppose you have a program on a drive other than drive C and want to use it from the desktop. You can make a shadow of the program for the desktop. The program is not physically moved or copied, which means you save space on your hard disk, but you can use it from the desktop.

shutdown    537/3

shutdown The process of selecting the Shut down choice before the computer is powered off so that data and configuration information is not lost.

slider    538/3

slider A control that represents a quantity and its relationship to the range of possible values for that quantity. In some cases, you can change the value of the quantity.

soft font    539/3

soft font Optional fonts shipped as files. Soft fonts must be installed onto the hard disk before they can be selected from programs. See also downloaded font.

source diskette    540/3

source diskette In a diskette-copying procedure, the diskette from which information is read. Contrast with target diskette.

source drive    541/3

source drive The drive from which information is read. Contrast with target drive.

specific DOS    542/3

specific DOS An actual DOS program product that is purchased independently of the OS/2 operating system. Examples include IBM DOS Version 3.x, Microsoft DOS Version 3.x, Digital Research** Version 5.0. Some programs are dependent on the internals of a specific DOS version. You can run these programs with the OS/2 operating system by starting a DOS session with a specific DOS version. Contrast with DOS session.

spooler    543/3

spooler A program that intercepts data going to a device driver and writes it to disk. The data is later printed or plotted when the required device is available. A spooler prevents output from different sources from being intermixed.

spooling    544/3

spooling The process of temporarily storing print jobs while waiting for an available printer or port. Spooling jobs frees system resources from waiting for a relatively slow device to provide output, and keeps the contents of each print job separated from the contents of every other print job.

sticky keys    545/3

sticky keys An input method that enables you to press and release a series of keys sequentially (for example, Ctrl+Alt+Del), yet have the keys behave as if they were pressed and released at the same time. This method can be used for those who require special-needs settings to make the keyboard easier to use.

system    546/3

system A flag that indicates that a file or directory is part of the operating system.

system font    547/3

system font One of the fonts available for screen display and printing. You can specify any size for this font, and it supports any language. Contrast with device font.

T    548/2+


tab    549/3

tab (1) An action, achieved by pressing the Tab key that moves the cursor to the next field. (2) A graphical representation of a book-like tab on a notebook that, when selected, turns the notebook page.

target diskette    550/3

target diskette In a diskette or storage copying procedure, the diskette onto which information is written. Contrast with source diskette.

target drive    551/3

target drive The drive to which information is written. Contrast with source drive.

template    552/3

template An object that you can use as a model to create additional objects. When you drag a template you create another of the original object, as though you were peeling one of the objects off a stack.

tile    553/3

tile A choice in a menu that modifies the size of each window and arranges them so that they appear side-by-side and top-to-bottom.

title bar    554/3

title bar The area at the top of each window that can contain the window title and a title-bar icon. When appropriate, it also contains the hide, maximize, and restore buttons.

title-bar icon    555/3

title-bar icon The mini-icon in the upper-left corner of the title bar that represents the object that is open in the window. You can use the object to display the pop-up menu or close a window.

U    556/2+


user interface    557/3

user interface The hardware, software, or both that allows you to interact with and perform operations on a computer.

Using Help    558/3

Using Help A cascaded choice on the Help menu that gives you information about how the help function works. This choice is also available on those programs that have Help as a choice on a menu bar.

V    559/2+


value    560/3

value A quantity assigned to a constant, a variable, or a parameter.

videodisc    561/3

videodisc A disc on which programs are recorded for playback on a computer (or a television set); a recording on a videodisc.

view    562/3

view The appearance of the contents of an open object (for example, a folder can be displayed in icon view, tree view, settings view or details view.

virtual device driver    563/3

virtual device driver A type of device driver used by DOS programs running in a DOS virtual machine, in order to access devices such as the screen or mouse which must be shared with other processes in the system. The virtual device driver maps DOS device commands to the normal (physical) device driver under OS/2 Version 3.

virtual DOS machine    564/3

virtual DOS machine See DOS session.

W    565/2+


waveform    566/3

waveform (1) A graphic representation of the shape of a wave that indicates the wave's characteristics, such as frequency and amplitude. (2) A digital method of storing and manipulating audio data within a computer. (3) A series of digital samples of the audio input stream taken at regular intervals over the duration of the audio event.

wildcard character    567/3

wildcard character Either a question mark (?) or an asterisk (*) used as a variable in a file name or file name extension when referring to a particular file or group of files.

WIN-OS/2*    568/3

WIN-OS/2* WIN-OS/2 is a feature of OS/2 that enables OS/2 to run supported Windows programs. See supported Windows programs.

WIN-OS/2 session    569/3

WIN-OS/2 session A WIN-OS/2 session created by the OS/2 operating system that supports the independent processing of a Windows program. The Windows program can run in a WIN-OS/2 full-screen, WIN-OS/2 window, or WIN-OS/2 window separate session.

window    570/3

window An area of the screen with visible boundaries within which information is displayed. A window can be smaller than or the same size as the screen. Windows can appear to overlap on the screen.

Window List    571/3

Window List A menu choice that displays a list of all of the open windows in a product. Use the Window List choice to switch to an active program, to tile or cascade open program windows, to surface hidden windows, or to close a program.

Windows program    572/3

Windows program A program written for the Microsoft Windows application programming interface.

workarea    573/3

workarea A folder setting that enables you to organize your desktop by grouping together objects for a specific task. For example, you could group a plotter object with data-file objects that contain charts and documents.

working directory    574/3

working directory A specified directory that becomes the current directory when a program is started. The current directory is the first directory in which the operating system looks for programs and files and stores temporary files and output. Some programs require a working directory.

Workplace Shell    575/3

Workplace Shell A graphical user interface that makes working with your computer easier. The Workplace shell lets you manage your work without having to learn the complexities of the operating system.