Difference between revisions of "Screen Reader/2 user's guide"

From OS2World.com Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m
 
Line 168: Line 168:
 
Announce changes in the entry field of a combo box.
 
Announce changes in the entry field of a combo box.
  
Read the description of the highlighted setting in
+
Read the description of the highlighted setting in the DOS Settings or Win-OS/2 Settings Notebook.
the DOS Settings or Win-OS/2 Settings Notebook.
+
  
When you are using a menu and Screen Reader/2 is set for
+
When you are using a menu and Screen Reader/2 is set for quiet talking level, Screen Reader/2 does not announce shortcut keys information for menu items. Shortcut keys information is announced for chatty and moderate talking levels. In addition, when a selector is highlighted
quiet talking level, Screen Reader/2 does not announce
+
while in chatty mode, you will hear three beeps. If the selector is not highlighted, no beeps will be heard.
shortcut keys information for menu items. Shortcut keys
+
information is announced for chatty and moderate talking
+
levels. In addition, when a selector is highlighted
+
while in chatty mode, you will hear three beeps. If the
+
selector is not highlighted, no beeps will be heard.
+
  
NOTE:  If you are a user of the previous version of
+
NOTE:  If you are a user of the previous version of Screen Reader/2, you should refer to "Changes to Screen Reader/2, Version 1.0".
Screen Reader/2, you should refer to "Changes to
+
Screen Reader/2, Version 1.0".
+
  
 
WINDOWS ENVIRONMENT
 
WINDOWS ENVIRONMENT
  
With OS/2 2.1, you can run OS/2, DOS, and Windows
+
With OS/2 2.1, you can run OS/2, DOS, and Windows programs on the same desktop, without being concerned about what type of application it is or how it is being accessed.
programs on the same desktop, without being concerned
+
about what type of application it is or how it is being
+
accessed.
+
  
OS/2 2.1 enables you to run Windows applications on the
+
OS/2 2.1 enables you to run Windows applications on the OS/2 Desktop or on a separate desktop. This ability to run Windows programs alongside OS/2 and DOS windowed programs on the same desktop is known as "seamless Windows."
OS/2 Desktop or on a separate desktop. This ability to
+
run Windows programs alongside OS/2 and DOS windowed
+
programs on the same desktop is known as "seamless
+
Windows."
+
  
Screen Reader/2 provides access to Windows applications
+
Screen Reader/2 provides access to Windows applications that are running seamlessly on the OS/2 Desktop. In the Windows environment, as in the OS/2 environment, Screen Reader/2 reads entry fields, selectors, action bars, highlights, pushbuttons, menus, and screen prompts
that are running seamlessly on the OS/2 Desktop. In the
+
Windows environment, as in the OS/2 environment, Screen
+
Reader/2 reads entry fields, selectors, action bars,
+
highlights, pushbuttons, menus, and screen prompts
+
 
automatically.
 
automatically.
  
Windows applications can be accessed by Screen Reader/2
+
Windows applications can be accessed by Screen Reader/2 in the following ways:
in the following ways:
+
  
 
1.  You can run one Windows program at a time by entering
 
1.  You can run one Windows program at a time by entering
Line 813: Line 793:
 
Move Margin Alert to the Left
 
Move Margin Alert to the Left
  
CHORD D 7.  Shifts the margin alert to the left by one
+
CHORD D 7.  Shifts the margin alert to the left by one character. For example, if the margin alert is at its default setting of the 60th character, pressing this key sequence resets
character. For example, if the margin alert
+
is at its default setting of the 60th
+
character, pressing this key sequence resets
+
 
it to the 59th character.
 
it to the 59th character.
  
 
Move Margin Alert to the Right
 
Move Margin Alert to the Right
  
CHORD D 9.  Shifts the margin alert to the right by one
+
CHORD D 9.  Shifts the margin alert to the right by one character.  For example, if the margin alert is at its default setting of the 60th character, pressing this key sequence resets
character.  For example, if the margin alert
+
is at its default setting of the 60th
+
character, pressing this key sequence resets
+
 
it to the 61st character.
 
it to the 61st character.
  
 
CHARACTER-DELETION FEEDBACK
 
CHARACTER-DELETION FEEDBACK
  
Echo modes respond to character deletions by echoing
+
Echo modes respond to character deletions by echoing characters, partial words, or complete words. This section discusses how to use and customize this feature.
characters, partial words, or complete words. This
+
section discusses how to use and customize this feature.
+
  
 
Deletion-Feedback Types
 
Deletion-Feedback Types
  
CHORD D C THEN 7.  Cycles through deletion-feedback
+
CHORD D C THEN 7.  Cycles through deletion-feedback types.
types.
+
  
When you use the DELETE key or the
+
When you use the DELETE key or the destructive BACKSPACE key in conjunction with echoes, you can choose one of the following three types of feedback:
destructive BACKSPACE key in
+
conjunction with echoes, you can
+
choose one of the following three
+
types of feedback:
+
  
The DELETE key echoes the new
+
The DELETE key echoes the new character at the cursor position.
character at the cursor position.
+
The destructive BACKSPACE key echoes the character being removed.
The destructive BACKSPACE key
+
echoes the character being
+
removed.
+
  
The DELETE key echoes a partial
+
The DELETE key echoes a partial word starting at the cursor position. The destructive BACKSPACE key echoes the character being removed.
word starting at the cursor
+
position. The destructive
+
BACKSPACE key echoes the
+
character being removed.
+
  
The DELETE and destructive
+
The DELETE and destructive BACKSPACE keys echo the whole word at the cursor.
BACKSPACE keys echo the whole
+
word at the cursor.
+
  
The default is for the DELETE key to
+
The default is for the DELETE key to echo the new character at the cursor and for the destructive BACKSPACE key to echo the character being removed.
echo the new character at the cursor
+
and for the destructive BACKSPACE key
+
to echo the character being removed.
+
  
NOTE:  Deletion feedback is not
+
NOTE:  Deletion feedback is not available if Line Echo is the only active echo mode and no
available if Line Echo is the
+
only active echo mode and no
+
 
browses are active.
 
browses are active.
  
 
Cycle Length of Deletion Look-Ahead
 
Cycle Length of Deletion Look-Ahead
  
CHORD D C THEN 9.  Cycles through lengths of the
+
CHORD D C THEN 9.  Cycles through lengths of the deletion look-ahead (3 through 20).
deletion look-ahead (3 through 20).
+
  
If a line contains repeating
+
If a line contains repeating characters and you delete several, Screen Reader/2 may not be able to detect that characters were deleted, because the character at the cursor position does not change. For example, if a line contains nine asterisks and you delete five, the character at the cursor position is still an asterisk. However, Screen Reader/2 provides a deletion
characters and you delete several,
+
look-ahead feature. You can set the number of characters that you want Screen Reader/2 to look ahead. This number can be from 3 to 20; the default length of the deletion look-ahead is 3.  When you set the look-ahead size, Screen Reader/2 looks ahead that number of characters to see if text has changed. Thus, it can detect that characters were deleted.
Screen Reader/2 may not be able to
+
detect that characters were deleted,
+
because the character at the cursor
+
position does not change. For
+
example, if a line contains nine
+
asterisks and you delete five, the
+
character at the cursor position is
+
still an asterisk. However, Screen
+
Reader/2 provides a deletion
+
look-ahead feature. You can set the
+
number of characters that you want
+
Screen Reader/2 to look ahead. This
+
number can be from 3 to 20; the
+
default length of the deletion
+
look-ahead is 3.  When you set the
+
look-ahead size, Screen Reader/2
+
looks ahead that number of characters
+
to see if text has changed. Thus, it
+
can detect that characters were
+
deleted.
+
  
 
Announce Length of Deletion Look-Ahead
 
Announce Length of Deletion Look-Ahead
  
CHORD D C THEN 8.  Announces the length of the deletion
+
CHORD D C THEN 8.  Announces the length of the deletion look-ahead.
look-ahead.
+
  
 
FUNCTION KEYS ON OR OFF
 
FUNCTION KEYS ON OR OFF
  
CHORD D C THEN C.  Toggles function-keys processing On
+
CHORD D C THEN C.  Toggles function-keys processing On or Off.
or Off.
+
  
By using this feature, you can decide
+
By using this feature, you can decide whether browse modes ignore function-key combinations or process them like other keys. When function-keys processing is turned Off, the edit facility ignores cursor movements caused by function-key combinations. When it is on, the edit facility processes cursor movements caused by function-key presses. Screen Reader/2 will speak according to the rules of echo and browse modes. The default is Off.
whether browse modes ignore
+
function-key combinations or process
+
them like other keys. When
+
function-keys processing is turned
+
Off, the edit facility ignores cursor
+
movements caused by function-key
+
combinations. When it is on, the
+
edit facility processes cursor
+
movements caused by function-key
+
presses. Screen Reader/2 will speak
+
according to the rules of echo and
+
browse modes. The default is Off.
+
  
 
TOGGLE EDIT FOR CONTROLS
 
TOGGLE EDIT FOR CONTROLS
  
CHORD D C THEN O.  Enables and disables the edit
+
CHORD D C THEN O.  Enables and disables the edit facility for controls.
facility for controls.
+
  
If you are navigating menus,
+
If you are navigating menus, notebooks, and other controls with a browse mode turned on, you might encounter a situation in which both the Presentation Manager profile and the edit facility are talking at the same time. To avoid this, place the cursor at the location where the duplicate verbalization is occurring and press CHORD D C THEN 0. This toggles the edit facility off for that control only.
notebooks, and other controls with a
+
browse mode turned on, you might
+
encounter a situation in which both
+
the Presentation Manager profile and
+
the edit facility are talking at the
+
same time. To avoid this, place the
+
cursor at the location where the
+
duplicate verbalization is occurring
+
and press CHORD D C THEN 0. This
+
toggles the edit facility off for
+
that control only.
+
  
If, on the other hand, you find that
+
If, on the other hand, you find that the edit facility is quiet when you would expect it to work, place the cursor on the control in question and press CHORD D C THEN 0. This activates the edit facility for that control and the control will now be read whenever the cursor travels over it.
the edit facility is quiet when you
+
would expect it to work, place the
+
cursor on the control in question and
+
press CHORD D C THEN 0. This
+
activates the edit facility for that
+
control and the control will now be
+
read whenever the cursor travels over
+
it.
+
  
You can have a maximum of 128
+
You can have a maximum of 128 controls active at one time. If you try to add more than that, Screen Reader/2 announces that the list is full, removes the last control from the list, and adds the current one.
controls active at one time. If you
+
try to add more than that, Screen
+
Reader/2 announces that the list is
+
full, removes the last control from
+
the list, and adds the current one.
+
  
 
BROWSE TALKING LEVEL
 
BROWSE TALKING LEVEL
Line 961: Line 854:
 
CHORD D C THEN D.  Toggles the browse talking level.
 
CHORD D C THEN D.  Toggles the browse talking level.
  
There are two talking levels
+
There are two talking levels available in browse modes: moderate and chatty. Moderate is the default.
available in browse modes: moderate
+
and chatty. Moderate is the default.
+
  
When the browse talking level is set
+
When the browse talking level is set to moderate, Screen Reader/2 reads text only when a cursor movement is directly caused by a key press. As a result, when a single key press causes a series of cursor movements, Screen Reader/2 might not read the line the cursor is on at the end of the process. For example, when you press ENTER in a 3270 terminal-emulation session, the
to moderate, Screen Reader/2 reads
+
cursor can move through a number of screen refreshes before it finally comes to rest.  In the moderate browse talking level, Screen Reader/2 will read the result of the first cursor movement, which may be a blank, but nothing after that.
text only when a cursor movement is
+
directly caused by a key press. As a
+
result, when a single key press
+
causes a series of cursor movements,
+
Screen Reader/2 might not read the
+
line the cursor is on at the end of
+
the process. For example, when you
+
press ENTER in a 3270
+
terminal-emulation session, the
+
cursor can move through a number of
+
screen refreshes before it finally
+
 
+
comes to rest.  In the moderate
+
browse talking level, Screen Reader/2
+
will read the result of the first
+
cursor movement, which may be a
+
blank, but nothing after that.
+
  
 
When the browse talking level is set
 
When the browse talking level is set
Line 1,017: Line 891:
 
ADVANCED READING KEY SEQUENCES
 
ADVANCED READING KEY SEQUENCES
  
The following sections discuss key sequences that make
+
The following sections discuss key sequences that make Screen Reader/2 read the screen for you:
Screen Reader/2 read the screen for you:
+
  
 
Characters.
 
Characters.
Line 1,031: Line 904:
 
CHARACTERS
 
CHARACTERS
  
0 THEN 7. Reads the character in the line above the
+
0 THEN 7. Reads the character in the line above the current cursor or pointer location.
current cursor or pointer location.
+
0 THEN 9. Reads the character in the line below the current cursor or pointer location.
0 THEN 9. Reads the character in the line below the
+
current cursor or pointer location.
+
  
 
FIRST, MIDDLE, AND LAST WORD
 
FIRST, MIDDLE, AND LAST WORD
Line 1,101: Line 972:
 
READ FIELDS
 
READ FIELDS
  
A field is a contiguous area of the display with the same
+
A field is a contiguous area of the display with the same attributes. An attribute determines how an item appears on the screen, such as color, font, underlining, blinking, and so forth.  Therefore, a field can be one character, several characters, a line, several lines, or an entire screen.
attributes. An attribute determines how an item appears
+
on the screen, such as color, font, underlining,
+
blinking, and so forth.  Therefore, a field can be one
+
character, several characters, a line, several lines, or
+
an entire screen.
+
  
Using Screen Reader/2, you can read the previous,
+
Using Screen Reader/2, you can read the previous, current, and next fields, and the rest of the current field. You can also specify the characteristics that Screen Reader/2 uses to determine a field. The first four key sequences, * THEN 1, * THEN 2, * THEN 3, and * THEN A, are useful, for example, for reading menus that ask for input into highlighted fields.
current, and next fields, and the rest of the current
+
field. You can also specify the characteristics that
+
Screen Reader/2 uses to determine a field. The first
+
four key sequences, * THEN 1, * THEN 2, * THEN 3, and *
+
THEN A, are useful, for example, for reading menus that
+
ask for input into highlighted fields.
+
  
Use key sequences * THEN H and CHORD * H to change the
+
Use key sequences * THEN H and CHORD * H to change the way Screen Reader/2 defines a field.  You can specify that Screen Reader/2 uses only the background color, only the foreground color, both foreground and background colors, or no color when it determines a field. (You
way Screen Reader/2 defines a field.  You can specify
+
should specify no color if you only want to use font information.)
that Screen Reader/2 uses only the background color, only
+
the foreground color, both foreground and background
+
colors, or no color when it determines a field. (You
+
should specify no color if you only want to use font
+
information.)
+
  
For example, if an application has a menu on which the
+
For example, if an application has a menu on which the choices all appear with the same background color, but the first letter of each choice is a different color, you can set the field definition to background. In this case, Screen Reader/2 reads the entire word as a field
choices all appear with the same background color, but
+
rather than considering the first letter and the rest of the word as separate fields.
the first letter of each choice is a different color, you
+
can set the field definition to background. In this
+
case, Screen Reader/2 reads the entire word as a field
+
rather than considering the first letter and the rest of
+
the word as separate fields.
+
  
You can also ask Screen Reader/2 to include font changes
+
You can also ask Screen Reader/2 to include font changes in the field definition. A font is the style of letters used to display information. Usually, a document will be displayed all in one font, such as Helvetica, Courier, or Bookman. A different font might be used within a
in the field definition. A font is the style of letters
+
document to draw attention to a particular character or word.
used to display information. Usually, a document will be
+
displayed all in one font, such as Helvetica, Courier, or
+
Bookman. A different font might be used within a
+
document to draw attention to a particular character or
+
word.
+
 
+
The default field definition is the mixture of attributes
+
(foreground and background) with font changes ignored.
+
  
The previous, current, and next fields are relative to
+
The default field definition is the mixture of attributes (foreground and background) with font changes ignored.
the cursor or pointer location for the following key
+
sequences:
+
  
 +
The previous, current, and next fields are relative to the cursor or pointer location for the following key sequences:
 
* THEN 1.  Reads the previous field.
 
* THEN 1.  Reads the previous field.
 
* THEN 2.  Reads the current field.
 
* THEN 2.  Reads the current field.
Line 1,161: Line 1,002:
 
FORMAT SHORTCUTS
 
FORMAT SHORTCUTS
  
The following key sequences are reading shortcuts. They
+
The following key sequences are reading shortcuts. They save time because you do not have to switch from your active format to the spell or phonetic format and then switch back; Screen Reader/2 does it for you automatically.
save time because you do not have to switch from your
+
active format to the spell or phonetic format and then
+
switch back; Screen Reader/2 does it for you
+
automatically.
+
  
For example, if you are using text format to read,
+
For example, if you are using text format to read, pressing * THEN 5 spells the word at the current pointer or cursor position, then Screen Reader/2 switches back to text format.
pressing * THEN 5 spells the word at the current pointer
+
or cursor position, then Screen Reader/2 switches back to
+
text format.
+
  
 
SPELLING SHORTCUTS
 
SPELLING SHORTCUTS
  
The following key sequences enable you to spell words
+
The following key sequences enable you to spell words quickly:
quickly:
+
 
+
 
* THEN 4.  Spells the previous word.
 
* THEN 4.  Spells the previous word.
 
* THEN 5.  Spells the current word.
 
* THEN 5.  Spells the current word.
 
* THEN 6.  Spells the next word.
 
* THEN 6.  Spells the next word.
* THEN B.  Spells the current word with capital letters
+
* THEN B.  Spells the current word with capital letters announced.
announced.
+
  
 
PHONETIC SHORTCUTS
 
PHONETIC SHORTCUTS
  
When you have trouble understanding a particular
+
When you have trouble understanding a particular character or word, you can use the phonetic shortcut keys to help you determine what the synthesizer is saying.
character or word, you can use the phonetic shortcut keys
+
to help you determine what the synthesizer is saying.
+
  
The phonetic alphabet uses a word beginning with the same
+
The phonetic alphabet uses a word beginning with the same letter to represent each character in our regular alphabet.
letter to represent each character in our regular
+
alphabet.
+
  
 
PHONETIC ALPHABET
 
PHONETIC ALPHABET
 +
Alpha        | Bravo        | Charlie      | Delta
 +
Echo        | Foxtrot      | Golf        | Hotel
 +
India        | Juliet      | Kilo        | Lima
 +
Mike        | November    | Oscar        | Papa
 +
Quebec      | Romeo        | Sierra      | Tango
 +
Uniform      | Victor      | Whiskey      | X-ray
 +
Yankee      | Zulu
  
+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+
+
You can use key sequence * THEN D to switch to the phonetic format, or use the following key sequences to hear a phonetic representation of just the previous, current, and next characters.
| Alpha        | Bravo        | Charlie      | Delta        |
+
| Echo        | Foxtrot      | Golf        | Hotel        |
+
| India        | Juliet      | Kilo        | Lima        |
+
| Mike        | November    | Oscar        | Papa        |
+
| Quebec      | Romeo        | Sierra      | Tango        |
+
| Uniform      | Victor      | Whiskey      | X-ray        |
+
| Yankee      | Zulu        |              |              |
+
+--------------+--------------+--------------+--------------+
+
  
You can use key sequence * THEN D to switch to the
+
* THEN 7.  Spells the previous character using the phonetic alphabet.
phonetic format, or use the following key sequences to
+
* THEN 8.  Spells the current character using the phonetic alphabet.
hear a phonetic representation of just the previous,
+
* THEN 9.  Spells the next character using the phonetic alphabet.
current, and next characters.
+
 
+
* THEN 7.  Spells the previous character using the
+
phonetic alphabet.
+
* THEN 8.  Spells the current character using the
+
phonetic alphabet.
+
* THEN 9.  Spells the next character using the phonetic
+
alphabet.
+
  
 
ANNOUNCING VALUES
 
ANNOUNCING VALUES
  
This section discusses key sequences that announce the
+
This section discusses key sequences that announce the following values:
following values:
+
  
 
ASCII Character Value.
 
ASCII Character Value.
Line 4,094: Line 3,911:
 
movement keys.
 
movement keys.
  
NOTE:  The Standard Keys and Extended
+
NOTE:  The Standard Keys and Extended Keys tables are used for the key-echo function.
Keys tables are used for the
+
key-echo function.
+
  
 
OTHER.            On this page, the settings are:
 
OTHER.            On this page, the settings are:
  
KEY DELAY. The amount of time
+
KEY DELAY. The amount of time Screen Reader/2 waits for a second key press before canceling a key sequence.
Screen Reader/2 waits for a second
+
key press before canceling a key
+
sequence.
+
  
KEYPAD. If this setting is
+
KEYPAD. If this setting is checked, you will hear a warning message if a keypad is not attached.
checked, you will hear a warning
+
message if a keypad is not
+
attached.
+
  
STOP. If checked, Screen Reader/2
+
STOP. If checked, Screen Reader/2 sends the Stop command each time a key is pressed on the keypad.
sends the Stop command each time a
+
key is pressed on the keypad.
+
  
CODE PAGE. Enables you to specify
+
CODE PAGE. Enables you to specify the code page that should be used with this file. Unless you are creating a file for another set of characters, this number should be identical to that of the code page you are currently using.
the code page that should be used
+
with this file. Unless you are
+
creating a file for another set of
+
characters, this number should be
+
identical to that of the code page
+
you are currently using.
+
  
COMMENTS. Contains information
+
COMMENTS. Contains information about the current code page.
about the current code page.
+
  
ANNOUNCEMENTS.   On this page, you can change what your
+
ANNOUNCEMENTS. On this page, you can change what your synthesizer says for the following types of announcements:
synthesizer says for the following
+
types of announcements:
+
 
Screen Reader/2 formats and modes.
 
Screen Reader/2 formats and modes.
 
Keypad and help messages.
 
Keypad and help messages.
 
Viewport messages.
 
Viewport messages.
Error messages and information
+
Error messages and information messages.
messages.
+
  
DICTIONARY.       On this page, you can tell Screen
+
DICTIONARY. On this page, you can tell Screen Reader/2 how the synthesizer should pronounce certain words which it might otherwise mispronounce, if following the normal rules of pronunciation. You tell Screen Reader/2 how to pronounce words by spelling them like they sound.
Reader/2 how the synthesizer should
+
pronounce certain words which it might
+
otherwise mispronounce, if following
+
the normal rules of pronunciation. You
+
tell Screen Reader/2 how to pronounce
+
words by spelling them like they sound.
+
  
For example, OS (for Operating System)
+
For example, OS (for Operating System) is included in your dictionary list of words. Because your synthesizer might read it as "OZ," the replacement letters "O S" provide the correct pronunciation to be used.
is included in your dictionary list of
+
words. Because your synthesizer might
+
read it as "OZ," the replacement
+
letters "O S" provide the correct
+
pronunciation to be used.
+
  
 
USING THE DICTIONARY AND SPELLING TABLES
 
USING THE DICTIONARY AND SPELLING TABLES
  
If you select the Utility choice on the action bar in the
+
If you select the Utility choice on the action bar in the Message Settings notebook and press ENTER, a pull-down menu with the following choices appears:
Message Settings notebook and press ENTER, a pull-down
+
menu with the following choices appears:
+
  
 
Import dictionary file.
 
Import dictionary file.
Line 4,160: Line 3,944:
 
Export spelling table.
 
Export spelling table.
  
Use this pull-down menu to import or export dictionary or
+
Use this pull-down menu to import or export dictionary or spelling-table ASCII files. When you choose any of these menu items, a dialog window appears that has a filename entry field. Type the name of the file containing your ASCII spelling table or dictionary. If you are exporting
spelling-table ASCII files. When you choose any of these
+
a spelling-table ASCII file, you must select the spelling-table name from a scrollable list.  To perform the import or export action, press ENTER.
menu items, a dialog window appears that has a filename
+
entry field. Type the name of the file containing your
+
ASCII spelling table or dictionary. If you are exporting
+
a spelling-table ASCII file, you must select the
+
spelling-table name from a scrollable list.  To perform
+
the import or export action, press ENTER.
+
  
 
SAVING YOUR CHANGES
 
SAVING YOUR CHANGES
  
You can change the message settings that you are
+
You can change the message settings that you are currently using. The changes take effect immediately and remain in effect only until you turn off Screen Reader/2.
currently using. The changes take effect immediately and
+
However, you can choose to save these settings for future use, and you can also change them in other files for future use.
remain in effect only until you turn off Screen Reader/2.
+
However, you can choose to save these settings for future
+
use, and you can also change them in other files for
+
future use.
+
  
You can save changes you made to the message settings in
+
You can save changes you made to the message settings in either of two ways:
either of two ways:
+
  
1. You can save the changes in the same message-settings
+
1. You can save the changes in the same message-settings file. To do this, press ALT+F4.
file. To do this, press ALT+F4.
+
  
2. You can save the changes in a different
+
2. You can save the changes in a different message-settings file. To do this:
message-settings file. To do this:
+
  
a. Select the File choice on the action bar and
+
a. Select the File choice on the action bar and press ENTER.
press ENTER.
+
  
b. Select Save to file from the pull-down menu to
+
b. Select Save to file from the pull-down menu to display a Save as file-dialog window. In this
display a Save as file-dialog window. In this
+
window, you can type a full drive, directory, and file name, or just a file name, and then select a drive and directory from the scrollable lists.
window, you can type a full drive, directory, and
+
 
file name, or just a file name, and then select a
+
c. To confirm that you want to save the file, press ENTER or choose the SAVE pushbutton.
drive and directory from the scrollable lists.
+
c. To confirm that you want to save the file, press
+
ENTER or choose the SAVE pushbutton.
+
  
 
CHANGING SETTINGS IN OTHER FILES
 
CHANGING SETTINGS IN OTHER FILES
  
To change Screen Reader/2 messages in files other than
+
To change Screen Reader/2 messages in files other than the one you are using:
the one you are using:
+
  
1. Open the Configuration - Screen Reader/2 object in
+
1. Open the Configuration - Screen Reader/2 object in your Independence Series folder.
your Independence Series folder.
+
  
All Screen Reader/2-supported message files are
+
All Screen Reader/2-supported message files are displayed as data objects in this folder.  These objects are identified by their file names. Message files have the extension .CNF. The default message file that Screen Reader/2 uses is SRD.CNF.
displayed as data objects in this folder.  These
+
objects are identified by their file names. Message
+
files have the extension .CNF. The default message
+
file that Screen Reader/2 uses is SRD.CNF.
+
  
2. To open a notebook to change the Screen Reader/2
+
2. To open a notebook to change the Screen Reader/2 messages and dictionary file, select the SRD.CNF file and press ENTER. The first page of the Screen Reader/2 Message Settings notebook is displayed.
messages and dictionary file, select the SRD.CNF file
+
and press ENTER. The first page of the Screen
+
Reader/2 Message Settings notebook is displayed.
+
  
3. Make the changes you want, then press F10 to move the
+
3. Make the changes you want, then press F10 to move the cursor to the File option on the action bar of the Message Settings notebook.
cursor to the File option on the action bar of the
+
Message Settings notebook.
+
  
4. Press ENTER to display the pull-down menu.
+
4. Press ENTER to display the pull-down menu.
  
5. Press ENTER to select the Save to file option.
+
5. Press ENTER to select the Save to file option.
  
6. The Save CNF File window is displayed. In this
+
6. The Save CNF File window is displayed. In this window, you can type a full drive, directory, and file name, or just a file name, and then select a drive and directory from the scrollable lists.
window, you can type a full drive, directory, and
+
file name, or just a file name, and then select a
+
drive and directory from the scrollable lists.
+
  
7. To confirm that you want to save the file, press
+
7. To confirm that you want to save the file, press ENTER or choose the SAVE pushbutton.
ENTER or choose the SAVE pushbutton.
+
  
 
SYNTHESIZERS
 
SYNTHESIZERS
  
This section contains technical data about the Screen
+
This section contains technical data about the Screen Reader/2-supported synthesizers.  Included are the default Screen Reader/2 settings for each synthesizer and the required switch settings, if any.
Reader/2-supported synthesizers.  Included are the
+
default Screen Reader/2 settings for each synthesizer and
+
the required switch settings, if any.
+
  
NOTE: To use a synthesizer not listed in this User's
+
NOTE: To use a synthesizer not listed in this User's Guide, contact either your synthesizer
Guide, contact either your synthesizer
+
manufacturer or the place where you purchased Screen Reader/2 to determine support and setup
manufacturer or the place where you purchased
+
Screen Reader/2 to determine support and setup
+
 
procedures.
 
procedures.
  
Line 4,250: Line 3,997:
 
SOFTWARE SETTINGS
 
SOFTWARE SETTINGS
  
The following values for the Accent synthesizer are in
+
The following values for the Accent synthesizer are in the ACC.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.
the ACC.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2
+
Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.
+
  
 
COM PORT.          COM1.
 
COM PORT.          COM1.
Line 4,274: Line 4,019:
 
Switches 4 and 8 are On; all others are Off.
 
Switches 4 and 8 are On; all others are Off.
  
NOTE: If you turn off the Accent synthesizer during a
+
NOTE: If you turn off the Accent synthesizer during a session, you should restart Screen Reader/2 after you turn the Accent on again. Otherwise, you might experience sluggish response.
session, you should restart Screen Reader/2 after
+
you turn the Accent on again. Otherwise, you
+
might experience sluggish response.
+
 
+
  
 
(10) Accent and Aicom are registered trademarks of Aicom Corporation.
 
(10) Accent and Aicom are registered trademarks of Aicom Corporation.
Line 4,286: Line 4,027:
 
SOFTWARE SETTINGS
 
SOFTWARE SETTINGS
  
The following values for the Apollo synthesizer are in
+
The following values for the Apollo synthesizer are in the APOLLO.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.
the APOLLO.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2
+
Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.
+
  
 
COM PORT.          COM1.
 
COM PORT.          COM1.
Line 5,723: Line 5,462:
 
SCAN KEYS
 
SCAN KEYS
  
CHORD 0 7.  Toggles setting and clearing the default
+
CHORD 0 7.  Toggles setting and clearing the default color.
color.
+
 
CHORD 0 8.  Toggles Color Scan On or Off.
 
CHORD 0 8.  Toggles Color Scan On or Off.
 
CHORD A 3.  Announces the status for scan.
 
CHORD A 3.  Announces the status for scan.
Line 5,737: Line 5,475:
 
SEARCH KEYS
 
SEARCH KEYS
  
# 1.        Searches for a string you specify from the
+
# 1.        Searches for a string you specify from the top.
top.
+
 
# 2.        Continues forward search.
 
# 2.        Continues forward search.
 
# 3.        Searches for the current string from the top.
 
# 3.        Searches for the current string from the top.
CHORD # 1.  Searches backward from the bottom for a
+
CHORD # 1.  Searches backward from the bottom for a string you specify.
string you specify.
+
 
CHORD # 2.  Continues backward search.
 
CHORD # 2.  Continues backward search.
CHORD # 3.  Searches backward from the bottom for the
+
CHORD # 3.  Searches backward from the bottom for the previous string.
previous string.
+
  
 
SET DEFINITION KEYS
 
SET DEFINITION KEYS
  
* H.              Sets the definition for foreground or
+
* H.              Sets the definition for foreground or background color, or a mixture of both.
background color, or a mixture of both.
+
 
# H.              Starts ignoring one or more characters.
 
# H.              Starts ignoring one or more characters.
 
CHORD # H.        Stops ignoring one or more characters.
 
CHORD # H.        Stops ignoring one or more characters.
Line 5,756: Line 5,490:
 
# D.              Turns on cursor mode.
 
# D.              Turns on cursor mode.
 
# 0.              Turns on pointer mode.
 
# 0.              Turns on pointer mode.
A 1 N.            Sets pitch (n can be any number from 1
+
A 1 N.            Sets pitch (n can be any number from 1 to 9).
to 9).
+
A 2 N.            Sets rate (n can be any number from 1 to 9).
A 2 N.            Sets rate (n can be any number from 1
+
A 3 N.            Sets volume (n can be any number from 1 to 9).
to 9).
+
A A N.            Sets Special Codes (n can be any number from 1 to 9).
A 3 N.            Sets volume (n can be any number from 1
+
to 9).
+
A A N.            Sets Special Codes (n can be any number
+
from 1 to 9).
+
 
CHORD A 1 THEN 2. Sets up the Hot key and the Stop key.
 
CHORD A 1 THEN 2. Sets up the Hot key and the Stop key.
CHORD A 5 THEN N. Sets the number of spaces that you want
+
CHORD A 5 THEN N. Sets the number of spaces that you want Screen Reader/2 to announce between
Screen Reader/2 to announce between
+
words.  (n can be any number from 1 to 9; the default is 2.)
words.  (n can be any number from 1 to
+
A C.              Cycles through word-definition settings (alphabetic, alphanumeric, and
9; the default is 2.)
+
A C.              Cycles through word-definition settings
+
(alphabetic, alphanumeric, and
+
 
nonblank).
 
nonblank).
CHORD A S.        Sets the amount of talking (chatty,
+
CHORD A S.        Sets the amount of talking (chatty, moderate, or quiet).
moderate, or quiet).
+
B C.              Sets the bottom-right corner of the viewport.
B C.              Sets the bottom-right corner of the
+
viewport.
+
  
 
B B B.            Sets the viewport to the full view.
 
B B B.            Sets the viewport to the full view.
Line 5,785: Line 5,510:
 
* 5.    Spells the current word.
 
* 5.    Spells the current word.
 
* 6.    Spells the next word.
 
* 6.    Spells the next word.
* 7.    Spells the previous character using the phonetic
+
* 7.    Spells the previous character using the phonetic alphabet.
alphabet.
+
* 8.    Spells the current character using the phonetic alphabet.
* 8.    Spells the current character using the phonetic
+
* 9.    Spells the next character using the phonetic alphabet.
alphabet.
+
* 9.    Spells the next character using the phonetic
+
alphabet.
+
 
* B.    Spells the current word with capitals.
 
* B.    Spells the current word with capitals.
  
Line 5,797: Line 5,519:
 
0 H.        Announces the time.
 
0 H.        Announces the time.
 
CHORD 0 H.  Announces the date.
 
CHORD 0 H.  Announces the date.
CHORD 0 S.  Toggles the time autospeak On or Off. The
+
CHORD 0 S.  Toggles the time autospeak On or Off. The default is Off.
default is Off.
+
  
 
TOGGLE KEYS
 
TOGGLE KEYS
Line 5,804: Line 5,525:
 
HELP.            Toggles Help mode On or Off.
 
HELP.            Toggles Help mode On or Off.
 
CHORD * 2.        Toggles Font Scan On or Off.
 
CHORD * 2.        Toggles Font Scan On or Off.
CHORD * H.        Toggles between inclusion and exclusion
+
CHORD * H.        Toggles between inclusion and exclusion of font changes in field definitions.
of font changes in field definitions.
+
# B.              Toggles reporting keyboard lock-key status On or Off.
# B.              Toggles reporting keyboard lock-key
+
status On or Off.
+
 
A 4.              Toggles Caps On or Off.
 
A 4.              Toggles Caps On or Off.
 
A 5.              Toggles Spaces On or Off.
 
A 5.              Toggles Spaces On or Off.
Line 5,817: Line 5,536:
 
A B.              Toggles Graphics On or Off.
 
A B.              Toggles Graphics On or Off.
 
A *.              Toggles Key Echo On or Off.
 
A *.              Toggles Key Echo On or Off.
CHORD A 1 THEN 1. Toggles between having the pop-up
+
CHORD A 1 THEN 1. Toggles between having the pop-up keypad active on the right or the left.
keypad active on the right or the left.
+
CHORD A 1 THEN 3. Toggles between the keyboard beeping or not beeping.
CHORD A 1 THEN 3. Toggles between the keyboard beeping or
+
CHORD A 1 THEN 4. Toggles between disabling only the keyboards keys of the pop-up keypad or
not beeping.
+
the entire typing area of the keyboard while the pop-up keypad is active.
CHORD A 1 THEN 4. Toggles between disabling only the
+
CHORD A 1 THEN B. Toggles the Hot key and the Stop key On or Off.
keyboards keys of the pop-up keypad or
+
the entire typing area of the keyboard
+
while the pop-up keypad is active.
+
CHORD A 1 THEN B. Toggles the Hot key and the Stop key On
+
or Off.
+
 
CHORD A 4.        Toggles Caps Scan On or Off.
 
CHORD A 4.        Toggles Caps Scan On or Off.
 
CHORD A 6.        Toggles Trailing Characters On or Off.
 
CHORD A 6.        Toggles Trailing Characters On or Off.
 
CHORD A 0.        Toggles SpellCaps On or Off.
 
CHORD A 0.        Toggles SpellCaps On or Off.
  
B D.              Toggles user-defined autospeaks On or
+
B D.              Toggles user-defined autospeaks On or Off.
Off.
+
 
D 7.              Toggles Character Echo On or Off.
 
D 7.              Toggles Character Echo On or Off.
 
D 8.              Toggles Word Echo On or Off.
 
D 8.              Toggles Word Echo On or Off.
 
D 9.              Toggles Line Echo On or Off.
 
D 9.              Toggles Line Echo On or Off.
 
D 0.              Toggles Column Browse On or Off.
 
D 0.              Toggles Column Browse On or Off.
D B.              Toggles the flush of text being spoken
+
D B.              Toggles the flush of text being spoken On or Off.
On or Off.
+
 
D #.              Toggles current selections.
 
D #.              Toggles current selections.
 
D *.              Toggles Line Browse On or Off.
 
D *.              Toggles Line Browse On or Off.
CHORD D 2.        Toggles between one-space and two-space
+
CHORD D 2.        Toggles between one-space and two-space sentence termination.
sentence termination.
+
CHORD D C THEN C. Toggles function-key processing On or Off.
CHORD D C THEN C. Toggles function-key processing On or
+
Off.
+
 
CHORD 0 8.        Toggles Color Scan On or Off.
 
CHORD 0 8.        Toggles Color Scan On or Off.
  
Line 5,850: Line 5,560:
  
 
B A.    Defines viewport 1 through 9.
 
B A.    Defines viewport 1 through 9.
B B N.  Makes viewport n the active viewport (n can be
+
B B N.  Makes viewport n the active viewport (n can be any number from 1 to 9).
any number from 1 to 9).
+
 
B B B.  Sets the viewport to the full view.
 
B B B.  Sets the viewport to the full view.
 
B C.    Sets the bottom-right corner of the viewport.
 
B C.    Sets the bottom-right corner of the viewport.
Line 5,857: Line 5,566:
 
B D B.  Turns off all active autospeaks.
 
B D B.  Turns off all active autospeaks.
 
B 0.    Defines autospeaks 1 through 9.
 
B 0.    Defines autospeaks 1 through 9.
B # N.  Announces the screen coordinates of viewport n or
+
B # N.  Announces the screen coordinates of viewport n or autospeak n.
autospeak n.
+
0 D.    Moves the pointer to the right edge of the viewport.
0 D.    Moves the pointer to the right edge of the
+
0 #.    Moves the pointer to the bottom left of the viewport.
viewport.
+
0 *.    Moves the pointer to the top left of the viewport.
0 #.    Moves the pointer to the bottom left of the
+
viewport.
+
0 *.    Moves the pointer to the top left of the
+
viewport.
+
  
 
==GLOSSARY==
 
==GLOSSARY==
 
 
A
 
A
  
 
ACKNOWLEDGE STOP.
 
ACKNOWLEDGE STOP.
In Screen Reader/2, a parameter that specifies if the
+
In Screen Reader/2, a parameter that specifies if the synthesizer sends a control sequence back to Screen Reader/2 to indicate that it has received, and has acted upon, the Screen Reader/2 Stop sequence.
synthesizer sends a control sequence back to Screen
+
Reader/2 to indicate that it has received, and has
+
acted upon, the Screen Reader/2 Stop sequence.
+
  
 
ALWAYS STOP.
 
ALWAYS STOP.
A Screen Reader/2 parameter that specifies if the
+
A Screen Reader/2 parameter that specifies if the synthesizer allows a Stop sequence to be sent even if Not Clear to Send or XOFF has been received.
synthesizer allows a Stop sequence to be sent even if
+
Not Clear to Send or XOFF has been received.
+
  
 
APPLICATION PROGRAM.
 
APPLICATION PROGRAM.
A program written for, or by, a user that applies to
+
A program written for, or by, a user that applies to the user's work, such as a program that does inventory control or word processing.
the user's work, such as a program that does inventory
+
control or word processing.
+
  
NOTE: Screen Reader/2 contains profiles that define
+
NOTE: Screen Reader/2 contains profiles that define keypad key sequences customized for use with specific application programs.
keypad key sequences customized for use with
+
specific application programs.
+
  
 
ASCII.
 
ASCII.
An acronym standing for American National Standard
+
An acronym standing for American National Standard Code for Information Interchange. The ASCII code is a character set consisting of seven-bit coded characters (eight bits, including parity check). It is used for information interchange among data-processing systems, data-communication systems, and associated equipment.
Code for Information Interchange. The ASCII code is a
+
The ASCII set consists of control characters and graphic characters.
character set consisting of seven-bit coded characters
+
(eight bits, including parity check). It is used for
+
information interchange among data-processing systems,
+
data-communication systems, and associated equipment.
+
The ASCII set consists of control characters and
+
graphic characters.
+
  
NOTE: IBM has defined an extension to the ASCII code
+
NOTE: IBM has defined an extension to the ASCII code (characters 128-255).
(characters 128-255).
+
  
 
ATTRIBUTE.
 
ATTRIBUTE.
Used here as a display attribute, it is a number that
+
Used here as a display attribute, it is a number that determines how an item should appear on the screen. For example, an attribute could be the color of a screen character or indicate that the Presentation Manager character is italic, bold, or underlined.
determines how an item should appear on the screen.
+
For example, an attribute could be the color of a
+
screen character or indicate that the Presentation
+
Manager character is italic, bold, or underlined.
+
  
 
AUTOSPEAK.
 
AUTOSPEAK.
An autospeak monitors values or areas of the screen
+
An autospeak monitors values or areas of the screen for change and then announces the change.  It is a unique feature of Screen Reader/2 and the Profile Access Language.
for change and then announces the change.  It is a
+
unique feature of Screen Reader/2 and the Profile
+
Access Language.
+
  
 
B
 
B
  
 
BAUD RATE.
 
BAUD RATE.
The measure of the transmission rate between a
+
The measure of the transmission rate between a computer and a synthesizer; it is approximately ten times the number of characters transmitted per second.
computer and a synthesizer; it is approximately ten
+
times the number of characters transmitted per second.
+
  
 
BROWSE.
 
BROWSE.
An edit function, browsing is used primarily for
+
An edit function, browsing is used primarily for reading. It enables you to hear the character, word, or line the cursor is on, depending on where you move the cursor. If Page Browse is On, a page is read automatically.
reading. It enables you to hear the character, word,
+
or line the cursor is on, depending on where you move
+
the cursor. If Page Browse is On, a page is read
+
automatically.
+
  
 
BUFFER MANAGEMENT.
 
BUFFER MANAGEMENT.
A Screen Reader/2 synthesizer parameter that enables
+
A Screen Reader/2 synthesizer parameter that enables Screen Reader/2 to wait for a good breaking point in the text before sending a talk command and a "buffer full" string to the synthesizer, leaving room for the Stop command.
Screen Reader/2 to wait for a good breaking point in
+
the text before sending a talk command and a "buffer
+
full" string to the synthesizer, leaving room for the
+
Stop command.
+
  
 
C
 
C
  
 
CHILD WINDOW.
 
CHILD WINDOW.
A window that is positioned relative to another window
+
A window that is positioned relative to another window (either a main window or another child window). Contrast with parent window.
(either a main window or another child window).
+
Contrast with parent window.
+
  
 
CHORD.
 
CHORD.
A key sequence that consists of two keypad keys that
+
A key sequence that consists of two keypad keys that are pressed at the same time and can be combined with other key presses.  An example of a key sequence that includes a chord is CHORD 1 2 THEN B.
are pressed at the same time and can be combined with
+
other key presses.  An example of a key sequence that
+
includes a chord is CHORD 1 2 THEN B.
+
  
 
CLEAR TO SEND (CTS).
 
CLEAR TO SEND (CTS).
In data communications, a term meaning that the
+
In data communications, a term meaning that the protocol between the computer and the communications device is based on hardware.
protocol between the computer and the communications
+
device is based on hardware.
+
  
 
CODE PAGE.
 
CODE PAGE.
The character display you can select for your system
+
The character display you can select for your system based on the country code. A system can be enabled for two pages, typically 437 (English) and 850 (International). Screen Reader/2 needs to know the code pages to announce the characters correctly.
based on the country code. A system can be enabled
+
for two pages, typically 437 (English) and 850
+
(International). Screen Reader/2 needs to know the
+
code pages to announce the characters correctly.
+
  
 
COLUMN VIEWER.
 
COLUMN VIEWER.
A Screen Reader/2 feature that enables you to read
+
A Screen Reader/2 feature that enables you to read columnar information quickly and easily.
columnar information quickly and easily.
+
  
 
COMMUNICATION PORT (COM PORT).
 
COMMUNICATION PORT (COM PORT).
An access point for data entry or exit either to or
+
An access point for data entry or exit either to or from a communication device such as your speech synthesizer. A communications port is sometimes called a serial port or serial connector. (COM1, COM2, and COM3 are character-device names reserved for serial ports 1 through 3.)
from a communication device such as your speech
+
synthesizer. A communications port is sometimes
+
called a serial port or serial connector. (COM1,
+
COM2, and COM3 are character-device names reserved for
+
serial ports 1 through 3.)
+
  
 
CONTROL WINDOW.
 
CONTROL WINDOW.
A class of window used to handle a specific kind of
+
A class of window used to handle a specific kind of user interaction. Radio buttons and check boxes are
user interaction. Radio buttons and check boxes are
+
 
examples.
 
examples.
  
 
CURSOR.
 
CURSOR.
A symbol displayed on the screen and associated with
+
A symbol displayed on the screen and associated with an input device. The cursor indicates where input from the device will be placed. Types of cursors include text cursors, graphics cursors, and selection cursors. Contrast with focus and pointer.
an input device. The cursor indicates where input
+
from the device will be placed. Types of cursors
+
include text cursors, graphics cursors, and selection
+
cursors. Contrast with focus and pointer.
+
  
 
D
 
D
  
 
DEFAULT VALUE.
 
DEFAULT VALUE.
A value used when no value is explicitly specified by
+
A value used when no value is explicitly specified by the user. For example, the default value for synthesizer volume is 5.
the user. For example, the default value for
+
synthesizer volume is 5.
+
  
 
DESKTOP.
 
DESKTOP.
(1) In P M, a window that displays a list of groups of
+
(1) In P M, a window that displays a list of groups of programs, each of which can be started or stopped.
programs, each of which can be started or stopped.
+
(2) The window, corresponding to the physical device, against which all other types of windows are established.
(2) The window, corresponding to the physical device,
+
against which all other types of windows are
+
established.
+
  
 
DICTIONARY.
 
DICTIONARY.
A list of words and replacement strings. Screen
+
A list of words and replacement strings. Screen Reader/2 uses the dictionary to read words differently from the way the synthesizer would speak them normally.
Reader/2 uses the dictionary to read words differently
+
from the way the synthesizer would speak them
+
normally.
+
  
 
DIALOG BOX.
 
DIALOG BOX.
A type of window that contains one or more controls
+
A type of window that contains one or more controls for the formatted display and entry of data. Also known as a pop-up window.
for the formatted display and entry of data. Also
+
known as a pop-up window.
+
  
 
E
 
E
  
 
ECHO.
 
ECHO.
An edit function, echoing is used primarily for
+
An edit function, echoing is used primarily for writing. It repeats (speaks) what you just typed, whether it is a character, word, or line.
writing. It repeats (speaks) what you just typed,
+
whether it is a character, word, or line.
+
  
 
ENTRY FIELD.
 
ENTRY FIELD.
An area on the screen, usually highlighted in some
+
An area on the screen, usually highlighted in some manner, in which users type information.
manner, in which users type information.
+
  
 
ENTRY-FIELD CONTROL.
 
ENTRY-FIELD CONTROL.
The means by which the application receives data
+
The means by which the application receives data entered by the user in an entry field. When it has the input focus, it displays a flashing pointer at the position where the next typed character will go.
entered by the user in an entry field. When it has
+
the input focus, it displays a flashing pointer at the
+
position where the next typed character will go.
+
  
 
F
 
F
  
 
FIELD.
 
FIELD.
In Screen Reader/2, a contiguous area of the display
+
In Screen Reader/2, a contiguous area of the display with the same color or font. It can be one character, several characters, a line, several lines, or an entire window.
with the same color or font. It can be one character,
+
several characters, a line, several lines, or an
+
entire window.
+
  
 
FOCUS.
 
FOCUS.
The point where keyboard actions will take effect. In
+
The point where keyboard actions will take effect. In OS/2, the focus is usually on the window or control where the cursor is located currently.
OS/2, the focus is usually on the window or control
+
where the cursor is located currently.
+
  
 
FONT.
 
FONT.
A particular size and style of typeface that contains
+
A particular size and style of typeface that contains definitions of character sets, marker sets, and pattern sets.
definitions of character sets, marker sets, and
+
pattern sets.
+
  
 
FORMAT.
 
FORMAT.
In Screen Reader/2, any one of five methods of reading
+
In Screen Reader/2, any one of five methods of reading information on the screen. These methods are text, pronounce, spell, phonetic, and ASCII.
information on the screen. These methods are text,
+
pronounce, spell, phonetic, and ASCII.
+
  
 
FULL-SCREEN APPLICATION.
 
FULL-SCREEN APPLICATION.
Line 6,057: Line 5,681:
  
 
GRAPHIC CHARACTER.
 
GRAPHIC CHARACTER.
In Screen Reader/2, a set of characters with ASCII
+
In Screen Reader/2, a set of characters with ASCII values from 176 to 223 that are "box"  
values from 176 to 223 that are "box"
+
characters-corners, vertical and horizontal lines, tees, crosses, and intersections.
characters--corners, vertical and horizontal lines,
+
tees, crosses, and intersections.
+
  
 
H
 
H
  
 
HANDSHAKING.
 
HANDSHAKING.
For communications with the synthesizer, either Clear
+
For communications with the synthesizer, either Clear to Send, a hardware protocol, or XON/XOFF, a software protocol. Handshaking tells Screen Reader/2 when it can transmit information to the synthesizer. Another word for handshaking is protocol.
to Send, a hardware protocol, or XON/XOFF, a software
+
protocol. Handshaking tells Screen Reader/2 when it
+
can transmit information to the synthesizer. Another
+
word for handshaking is protocol.
+
  
 
I
 
I
  
 
ICON.
 
ICON.
A graphical representation of an object consisting of
+
A graphical representation of an object consisting of an image and its background. Icons can represent items (such as a document file) with which a user wants to work, and actions that the user wants to perform. In Presentation Manager, icons are used for data objects, system actions, and minimized programs.
an image and its background. Icons can represent
+
items (such as a document file) with which a user
+
wants to work, and actions that the user wants to
+
perform. In Presentation Manager, icons are used for
+
data objects, system actions, and minimized programs.
+
  
 
INDEXING.
 
INDEXING.
The capability of some synthesizers to send markers
+
The capability of some synthesizers to send markers back through the asynchronous communications channel after each word is spoken. This capability enables the Screen Reader/2 pointer to move to the beginning of each word as it is spoken.
back through the asynchronous communications channel
+
after each word is spoken. This capability enables
+
the Screen Reader/2 pointer to move to the beginning
+
of each word as it is spoken.
+
  
 
INPUT FOCUS.
 
INPUT FOCUS.
The area of the screen that will receive input from an
+
The area of the screen that will receive input from an input device (typically, the keyboard).
input device (typically, the keyboard).
+
  
 
K
 
K
  
 
KEYPAD.
 
KEYPAD.
A rectangular piece of equipment with 18 keys that
+
A rectangular piece of equipment with 18 keys that directs Screen Reader/2 to speak text from the screen.
directs Screen Reader/2 to speak text from the screen.
+
The keypad can be attached to a mouse port or to a Screen Reader/2 adapter.
The keypad can be attached to a mouse port or to a
+
Screen Reader/2 adapter.
+
  
 
L
 
L
  
 
LENGTH.
 
LENGTH.
In asynchronous communication, the number of "transmit
+
In asynchronous communication, the number of "transmit and receive" data bits.
and receive" data bits.
+
  
 
N
 
N
  
 
NOTEBOOK.
 
NOTEBOOK.
A graphical representation of a bound notebook that
+
A graphical representation of a bound notebook that contains pages separated into sections by tabs. You can select a tab to turn to the section identified by the tab label. A section can contain one or more pages.
contains pages separated into sections by tabs. You
+
can select a tab to turn to the section identified by
+
the tab label. A section can contain one or more
+
pages.
+
  
 
NOTEBOOK CONTROLS.
 
NOTEBOOK CONTROLS.
A notebook control is used to make changes in an
+
A notebook control is used to make changes in an object's settings notebook. These changes take effect immediately. Screen Reader/2 notebook controls include: combination boxes, spin buttons, entry fields, menus, scroll bars, notebooks, buttons, list boxes, title bars, multiple-line entry fields, and static text.
object's settings notebook. These changes take effect
+
immediately. Screen Reader/2 notebook controls
+
include: combination boxes, spin buttons, entry
+
fields, menus, scroll bars, notebooks, buttons, list
+
boxes, title bars, multiple-line entry fields, and
+
static text.
+
  
 
P
 
P
  
 
PAL.
 
PAL.
Profile Access Language. A computer programming
+
Profile Access Language. A computer programming language that enables you to create or modify profiles for use with Screen Reader/2.
language that enables you to create or modify profiles
+
for use with Screen Reader/2.
+
  
 
PARENT WINDOW.
 
PARENT WINDOW.
The window relative to which one or more child windows
+
The window relative to which one or more child windows is positioned. Contrast with child window.
is positioned. Contrast with child window.
+
  
 
PARITY.
 
PARITY.
In asynchronous communications, maintaining the same
+
In asynchronous communications, maintaining the same level or count. For example, the speech synthesizer and the computer keep the same number of computer ones to perform a check based on an even or odd number for all words.
level or count. For example, the speech synthesizer
+
and the computer keep the same number of computer ones
+
to perform a check based on an even or odd number for
+
all words.
+
  
 
PHONETIC ALPHABET.
 
PHONETIC ALPHABET.
An alphabet that represents each character by a word
+
An alphabet that represents each character by a word beginning with the same letter. For example, e f g is echo, foxtrot, golf.
beginning with the same letter. For example, e f g is
+
echo, foxtrot, golf.
+
  
 
PITCH.
 
PITCH.
The parameter that adjusts the frequency; that is, the
+
The parameter that adjusts the frequency; that is, the high or low tone of the synthesizer's voice.
high or low tone of the synthesizer's voice.
+
  
 
PIXEL.
 
PIXEL.
The smallest area of a display screen capable of being
+
The smallest area of a display screen capable of being addressed and switched between visible and invisible states. Combined together, they constitute an image (as on a computer screen).
addressed and switched between visible and invisible
+
states. Combined together, they constitute an image
+
(as on a computer screen).
+
  
 
POINTER.
 
POINTER.
(1) A Screen Reader/2-unique marking device that is
+
(1) A Screen Reader/2-unique marking device that is invisible on the screen and moves along as speech commences. It provides a way to move around the screen that is not dependent on cursor movement, thereby allowing full access to the screen.
invisible on the screen and moves along as speech
+
(2) The symbol displayed on the screen that is moved by a pointing device, such as a mouse.  The pointer is used to point to items that users can select. Contrast with cursor.
commences. It provides a way to move around the
+
screen that is not dependent on cursor movement,
+
thereby allowing full access to the screen. (2) The
+
symbol displayed on the screen that is moved by a
+
pointing device, such as a mouse.  The pointer is used
+
to point to items that users can select. Contrast
+
with cursor.
+
  
 
POP-UP KEYPAD.
 
POP-UP KEYPAD.
A block of sixteen keys on the keyboard that emulates
+
A block of sixteen keys on the keyboard that emulates the main block of sixteen keys on the Screen Reader/2 keypad. The block is arranged four keys by four keys and can be set up on either the left or right side of a keyboard.
the main block of sixteen keys on the Screen Reader/2
+
keypad. The block is arranged four keys by four keys
+
and can be set up on either the left or right side of
+
a keyboard.
+
  
 
POP-UP WINDOW.
 
POP-UP WINDOW.
A window that appears on top of another window in a
+
A window that appears on top of another window in a dialog. Each pop-up window must be completed before returning to the underlying window.
dialog. Each pop-up window must be completed before
+
returning to the underlying window.
+
  
 
PRESENTATION MANAGER (P M).
 
PRESENTATION MANAGER (P M).
The visual component of OS/2 that presents, in
+
The visual component of OS/2 that presents, in windows, a graphics-based interface to applications and files installed and running in OS/2.
windows, a graphics-based interface to applications
+
and files installed and running in OS/2.
+
  
 
PROFILE.
 
PROFILE.

Latest revision as of 06:43, 11 September 2017

By IBM

“Reprint Courtesy of International Business Machines Corporation, © International Business Machines Corporation”

Contents

INTRODUCING SCREEN READER/2

Screen Reader/2 is a computer-access system which enables blind and visually impaired people to use OS/2, Windows, and DOS applications, all running under OS/2 2.1. It is the first computer-access system to automatically read the title, selector, and other system information presented by the graphical user interface in both OS/2 and Windows applications.

ENHANCEMENTS TO SCREEN READER/DOS AND SCREEN READER/2 1.0

Screen Reader/2, version 1.1, is similar to Screen Reader/DOS but works with OS/2, version 2.1. Most of the basic Screen Reader/2 key sequences are similar to those of Screen Reader/DOS and Screen Reader/2, version 1.0; however, new autospeaks, profiles, and key sequences have been added for Screen Reader/2 to support the OS/2 2.1 environment.

Screen Reader/2, version 1.1, has these additional enhancements to the Screen Reader product:

Key definitions have been changed to allow more forms of keypad key sequences. Screen Reader/2 uses a concept known as chords to extend its capabilities. A chord is a combination of two keys that are pressed simultaneously.

The way you install, start, modify, and view books for Screen Reader/2 is similar to other OS/2 2.1 applications.

Screen Reader/2 is so flexible, you can even use it with a laptop computer. You can assign the keypad key sequences to your keyboard.

Screen Reader/2 provides profiles that enable you to work with most of the applications included with OS/2 2.1. It also includes profiles for many popular software programs that work with OS/2, DOS, and Windows 3.1. These profiles are loaded automatically.

Screen Reader/2 can announce mouse movements and you can use the keypad to simulate mouse functions.

(1) OS/2 is a registered trademark of IBM Corporation.
(2) Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

You can now use multiple serial output devices, like a Braille display and a synthesizer.

In addition, if you have Screen Reader/2, Version 1.0, you will notice that there are additional profiles and "seamless" Windows support in Screen Reader/2, Version 1.1.

If you are a DOS user, you will find we have added new profiles for WordPerfect 5.1, Quicken 6.0, Lotus 1-2-3, and BookManager/Read.

SCREEN READER/2 DOCUMENTATION

The documentation that accompanies Screen Reader/2 includes a printed book, online books, cassettes, and two Reference Cards printed in Braille.

Getting Started provides step-by-step instructions for installing Screen Reader/2. In addition, Getting Started contains the Screen Reader/2 tutorial.

The tutorial teaches you the basic keypad key sequences as well as how to use Screen Reader/2 with your OS/2 Desktop. You learn how to find the Independence Series and Screen Reader/2 folders on your desktop and you learn how to use the Screen Reader/2 online books. Be sure to complete the tutorial before proceeding with the User's Guide.

Getting Started is available in print and on cassettes.

The User's Guide builds on the functions you learned in the tutorial and describes Screen Reader/2's advanced features. You learn about:

  • Views, viewports, and column viewer.
  • Autospeaks for application profiles.
  • Edit functions.
  • Pop-up keypad.
  • Profile tiers.
  • Key sequences.

In addition to the above, you also learn how to customize Screen Reader/2 to suit your environment and your preferences.

The User's Guide is only available as an online book. There is also a Reference Card in Braille that contains a complete listing of all Screen Reader/2 key sequences and their functions.

The PAL Reference explains the syntax of the Profile Access Language (PAL) for those who want to modify Screen Reader/2 profiles. Refer to the PAL Reference for information that helps you write your own application-specific profiles or change the profiles included in the package. The PAL Reference is available only as an online book.

The online OS/2 Keys book lists all the OS/2 keys you can use to navigate the OS/2 system, windows, help, and online books. It is also provided as a Reference Card printed in Braille.

OS/2 DESKTOP

The OS/2 Desktop contains graphical representations of the objects you use to perform your computer tasks. For most applications running under OS/2, the Desktop remains in the background. Unlike other applications you encounter, the default OS/2 Desktop does not contain a title, cannot be minimized or maximized, and, because it is in the background, it can be covered up by other active windows.

When you install Screen Reader/2, however, it changes the appearance of the Desktop so that it looks like other application folders. (It now has a title and can be maximized and minimized.) Screen Reader/2 also makes it easier for blind or visually impaired users to navigate OS/2. When OS/2 is installed, the icons are not arranged in any particular order. When you install Screen Reader/2, it changes the OS/2 Desktop to the flowed-icon format. This means that the icons are arranged so that the Home key moves the selector to the first object, the End key moves it to the last object, and the arrow keys move it in the corresponding directions.

RESTORING THE ORIGINAL DESKTOP:

If you prefer to use the Desktop that was installed with OS/2, follow these steps:

  1. At an OS/2 command prompt, type cd \srd22 and press ENTER to switch to the Screen Reader/2 subdirectory.
  2. Type os2desk and press ENTER.
  3. Use CHORD 7 8 THEN C to display the Desktop pop-up menu, then select Shut down.
  4. Reboot your computer.

NOTE: If you have a non-IBM computer, this procedure may not work for you. You should use the Window List to open the Desktop. Then press CTRL + \ to make sure no object is selected. Press SHIFT + F10 to display the Desktop pop-up menu, then select Shut down.

When you start your computer again, the OS/2 Desktop will be restored and will be in the background, full-screen, and without a title. However, it will remain in a flowed format.

RESTORING THE SCREEN READER/2 DESKTOP:

Having tried the original OS/2 Desktop, you may decide that Screen Reader/2's desktop is better after all. To restore it, follow these steps:

  1. At an OS/2 command prompt, type cd \srd22 and press ENTER.
  2. Type srd2desk and press ENTER.
  3. Use CHORD 7 8 THEN C to display the Desktop pop-up menu, then select Shut down.
  4. Reboot your computer.

NOTE: If you have a non-IBM computer, this procedure may not work for you. You should use the Window List to open the Desktop. Then press CTRL + \ to make sure no object is selected. Press SHIFT + F10 to display the Desktop pop-up menu, then select Shut down.

When you start your computer again, the Screen Reader/2 desktop will be displayed.

USING PRESENTATION MANAGER

Presentation Manager (PM) is the visual component of OS/2 that presents, in windows, a graphics-based interface to programs installed and running in OS/2.

Whenever the Presentation Manager active window changes, the Screen Reader/2 view changes and Screen Reader/2 announces the new window title, selector, or static text. Static text is text associated with a control (such as an entry field) or a group of controls. If a selector, or highlighted item, moves, Screen Reader/2 announces the contents of the new selector. When Screen Reader/2 detects other Presentation Manager focus changes, it announces them. For example, Screen Reader/2 reads an entry field and its prompt, whether a check box is checked or not, and any changes in spin button values.

PRESENTATION MANAGER KEY SEQUENCES:

NOTE: Below, and throughout the entire library of online Screen Reader/2 books, each key sequence presented in a list is ended by a period. This is done to force the synthesizer to pause after the key sequence is spoken. Disregard this period if you hear it.

CHORD 7 8 THEN 8. The "Where Am I?" key sequence. Announces the window title and the program name. You hear the following:

  1. The title that is on the title bar of the application window.
  2. The name of the program that is running.
  3. The type of application that is running:
    P M (for Presentation Manager).
    DOS full screen (for DOS).
    OS/2 full screen (for OS/2).
    Text window (for OS/2 and DOS windows).
    Seamless (Windows program running on the Desktop).

For example, if you are running the system editor, you would hear:

"System editor E.EXE Presentation Manager." CHORD 7 9 THEN N. Sets up the Screen Reader/2 switch list by associating the current window with keypad key n. This is useful when you work with a particular window frequently and want to use an "accelerator" to switch to that window quickly.

NOTE: n can be any keypad key except Stop and Help. CHORD 7 9 THEN STOP cancels the switch; CHORD 7 9 THEN HELP clears all entries in the current switch list.

From this point on, for the sake of brevity, the STOP key will be referred to as the S key and the HELP key will be referred to as the H key.

CHORD 7 9 THEN H. Clears the switch list. You are asked to confirm that you want to clear the entries. CHORD 8 9 THEN H. Announces the switch-list entries and their assigned keys. CHORD 8 9 THEN N. Makes window n the foreground window. CHORD 8 9 THEN N is used to switch to the window established by CHORD 7 9 THEN N. CHORD 7 8 THEN 7. Announces the window type and type of control at the current Screen Reader/2 pointer position. C THEN C. Announces the cursor line or selector. CHORD 7 8 THEN S. Reads static text (text associated with a control or group of controls). CHORD 7 8 THEN 9. Displays a list of windows in the current application. CHORD 1 2 THEN 4. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the Desktop. CHORD 1 2 THEN 5. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the view. CHORD 1 2 THEN 6. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the viewport. CHORD 1 2 THEN 7. Changes the view up one level to the parent window or the Desktop. CHORD 1 2 THEN 8. Resets the view to the focus window. CHORD 1 2 THEN 9. Changes the view down one level to a child window. CHORD 1 2 THEN C. Changes the view to the next sibling window. CHORD 1 2 THEN *. Changes the view to the next OS/2 text window.

CHORD 1 2 THEN A. Announces vertical scroll-bar information. The scroll-bar information that you hear depends on the program you are using. For example, for some programs Screen Reader/2 announces the percentage of the scroll bar that remains to be scrolled. CHORD 1 2 THEN B. Announces horizontal scroll-bar information. CHORD 1 2 THEN H. Reads the description for the highlighted setting in the DOS Settings or Win-OS/2 Settings Notebook. CHORD 7 8 THEN D. Toggles drawing noise On or Off. (Drawing noise is heard when activity is taking place on the screen, such as when a window is being maximized or minimized.) The default is Off. CHORD 7 8 THEN C. Displays the Desktop context menu.

Autospeaks in the Presentation Manager profile:

Announce the new title, plus static text or the system menu title, when a view changes.

Announce when the selector changes.

Announce, in menus, format shortcut keys and if there is a submenu associated with the menu item (indicated by a right arrow). When a menu item is not selectable, you will hear a beep.

Speak the entry field and prompt.

Announce whether check boxes or radio buttons are checked or not.

Announce changes in the entry field of a spin button.

Announce changes in the entry field of a combo box.

Read the description of the highlighted setting in the DOS Settings or Win-OS/2 Settings Notebook.

When you are using a menu and Screen Reader/2 is set for quiet talking level, Screen Reader/2 does not announce shortcut keys information for menu items. Shortcut keys information is announced for chatty and moderate talking levels. In addition, when a selector is highlighted while in chatty mode, you will hear three beeps. If the selector is not highlighted, no beeps will be heard.

NOTE: If you are a user of the previous version of Screen Reader/2, you should refer to "Changes to Screen Reader/2, Version 1.0".

WINDOWS ENVIRONMENT

With OS/2 2.1, you can run OS/2, DOS, and Windows programs on the same desktop, without being concerned about what type of application it is or how it is being accessed.

OS/2 2.1 enables you to run Windows applications on the OS/2 Desktop or on a separate desktop. This ability to run Windows programs alongside OS/2 and DOS windowed programs on the same desktop is known as "seamless Windows."

Screen Reader/2 provides access to Windows applications that are running seamlessly on the OS/2 Desktop. In the Windows environment, as in the OS/2 environment, Screen Reader/2 reads entry fields, selectors, action bars, highlights, pushbuttons, menus, and screen prompts automatically.

Windows applications can be accessed by Screen Reader/2 in the following ways:

1. You can run one Windows program at a time by entering start /win program name at the command prompt in an OS/2 window or full-screen command prompt. Don't forget to substitute the real program name for program name.

NOTE: This method works only if no other Windows programs are running.

2. Within Windows Program Manager, you can select Run, then type in the drive and filename of the program. This method enables you to run more than one Windows program at a time. (If you use Windows regularly, you might prefer this method.)

3. You can migrate your applications to the Windows Programs folder or the WIN-OS/2 Groups folder. Windows applications can be migrated either when you install OS/2 or after installation. This method also enables you to open more than one Windows application at a time.

NOTES:

1. The procedure for migrating Windows applications is described below.

2. Screen Reader/2 does not provide access to Windows programs in a WIN-OS/2 full screen.

MIGRATING WINDOWS APPLICATIONS

You can migrate your Windows applications to the OS/2 Desktop and launch them from there so that Screen Reader/2 is able to read the applications.

NOTE: Screen Reader/2 has no access to Win-OS/2 Full Screen sessions. Do not start your Windows programs using a Win-OS/2 Full Screen session.

The OS/2 Migrate Applications utility searches your computer drives for all Windows applications. It then creates a Desktop object which you can select to start your Windows application.

If your Windows programs are part of either the Windows Main or Windows Accessories group, OS/2 will migrate them to the Windows Accessories folder. If they are in the Windows Program Manager or any other Windows application, OS/2 will migrate them to the Windows Programs folder on the OS/2 Desktop.

To migrate your Windows applications, do the following:

1. Select the OS/2 System icon. 2. Select the System Setup icon. 3. Select the Migrate Applications icon. The Find Programs menu is displayed. This menu appears with the Windows programs option already selected. (The menu can also have DOS and OS/2 applications selected; you might want to deselect these two, using the SPACEBAR, if you do not need them.) 4. Select the Find button. The Migrate Programs window appears. This window contains all of the Windows applications that OS/2 found. 5. Using the SPACEBAR, deselect any program that you don't want to migrate. 6. Select the Migrate button. OS/2 migrates the applications to the OS/2 Desktop in a folder called Windows programs.

You can now select any of your Windows applications from this folder.

NOTE: Do not change the system colors through the windows control panel because you might impact Screen Reader/2's ability to recognize what it is supposed to read.

AUTOSPEAKS, VIEWPORTS, AND COLUMN VIEWER

In the tutorial, you learned how to use autospeaks to tell Screen Reader/2 to monitor areas of a text-based, full-screen or windowed session, and to announce when a change in that area occurs.

The tutorial also introduced you to viewports. You learned that a viewport is a specific part of a Screen Reader/2 view within which the program confines its reading. The viewport can be, for example, the entire screen or a portion of the screen. You can specify that the viewport be read automatically when you start using it.

Column viewer is another important Screen Reader/2 feature. The column-viewer facility enables you to read text or data in columnar format with one key sequence. Column viewer makes it easy to use spreadsheets and other applications that contain a lot of columnar information.

The viewport concept is similar to the column-viewer concept in that both enable you to set boundaries within which Screen Reader/2 confines its reading. However, there are two major differences between viewports and the column viewer. First, a viewport uses specific row and column coordinates as its boundaries, whereas column-viewer boundaries are determined by character strings (the default is two spaces). Second, a viewport restricts all reading commands to the limits of the viewport boundaries, whereas a column view is read with a special set of key sequences and does not prevent you from reading information outside of the column view with other Screen Reader/2 key sequences.

Once you have set up a column, the column viewer automatically sets the boundaries of the column. A set of simple key sequences enables you to read and navigate the column and move from one column to another.

The following sections provide additional information about using viewports, autospeaks, and column viewer.

AUTOSPEAKS AND VIEWPORTS FOR TEXT SCREENS

In a text-based session, you can define viewports using key sequences that start with B. You can use the viewports and autospeaks that you define any time during the session in which you defined them.

To use the definitions in future sessions, use key sequence B THEN * to save them.

NOTE: You may want to reuse viewport and autospeak numbers in order to discard old ones and create new ones.

VIEWAUTO KEY SEQUENCES:

B THEN A. Defines viewport 1 through 9. B THEN B THEN N. Makes viewport n the active viewport (n can be any number from 1 to 9). B THEN B THEN B. Sets the viewport to the full view. B THEN C. Sets the bottom-right corner of the viewport. B THEN 0. Defines autospeaks 1 through 9. B THEN # THEN N. Announces the screen coordinates of viewport n or autospeak n. B THEN *. Saves all viewport definitions and autospeak definitions. B THEN D THEN N. Toggles user-defined autospeak n On or Off (n can be any number from 1 to 9). B THEN D THEN B. Turns off all active autospeaks.

COLUMN VIEWER

It is easy to define columns and read them using the column-viewer feature. To start reading columns with the column viewer, move the pointer or cursor to any data in the column you want to read and press CHORD B A. The column viewer looks on either side of this data for the edges of the column. It defines the edge of a column as either the edge of the screen or as two blank spaces. The default of two blanks can be changed to any character string you like, using the Customization menu.

In manual mode, the vertical boundaries of the column are defined simply as the top and bottom of the screen. However, it is fairly difficult for the column viewer to define the top and bottom of a column in automatic mode. There are two methods for determining these boundaries in automatic mode.

METHOD 1

If non-blank characters are used for the left and right boundaries, the column viewer looks for the first row that does not have those characters in the same horizontal positions as the starting row. The column viewer stops just before the row that does not contain the boundary characters in those horizontal positions or at the edge of the screen, whichever comes first. You can move beyond this point with CHORD B 2 or CHORD B 8, but the column viewer beeps as you do so. You can adjust the edge positions to the new boundary conditions with CHORD B A.

METHOD 2

If blanks are used as the left and right boundary markers, it is much harder for the column viewer to determine when it has reached the top or bottom of a column. It tries to divide blocks of information on a page into separate columns, based on an "appropriate" amount of blank space around the information. There might be times when the column viewer is not accurate, but these errors will be on the conservative side, meaning that the column viewer will stop short rather than go too far.

MOVING AROUND IN COLUMNS

The only column-viewer reading functions that stop at the vertical boundaries of a column are: read from top, go to top, read to bottom, and go to bottom. You can move the column viewer past the top boundary with CHORD B 2 and below the bottom boundary with CHORD B 8. When you move the column viewer past a boundary, it will beep at you. If the left and right boundary characters are non-blanks, you can move back into the column view with CHORD B 2 or CHORD B 8 and it will stop beeping at you.

However, if you move beyond a vertical boundary and the horizontal boundary characters are blanks, the column viewer will only beep when you first cross the boundary because it will redefine the vertical boundaries based on the new position. In this case, CHORD B 2 or CHORD B 8 may not take you back to where you were. CHORD B * is provided to help you retrace your steps if you want to return to the previous column view.

As you move around the screen, up and down the columns and from one column to another, you will hear beeps that help you understand how much the column viewer is moving. If you are in pointer mode, the pointer follows the column viewer as you navigate through the columns.

NOTE: The column-viewer feature only works in full-screen or window text sessions; you cannot use it with Presentation Manager or Windows applications.

COLUMN-VIEWER KEY SEQUENCES

The column viewer uses the following key sequences:

B THEN 8. Announces the location of the column viewer and how many columns there are. B THEN 7. Announces the position of the left edge of the column viewer. B THEN 9. Announces the position of the right edge of the column viewer.

CHORD B A. Defines a column and says the current entry. CHORD B 0. Brings up the Customization menu. CHORD B 1. Reads from the top of the column to the current column-viewer position. CHORD B 5. Reads the current column entry. CHORD B 7. Reads from the current column-viewer position down to the bottom of the column. CHORD B 2. Moves the column viewer up one line and reads the column entry. CHORD B 8. Moves the column viewer down one line and reads the column entry. CHORD B 4. Moves the column viewer left one column and reads the column entry, or sets the left edge manually, depending on auto/manual mode setting. CHORD B 6. Moves the column viewer right one column and reads the column entry, or sets the right edge manually, depending on auto/manual mode setting. CHORD B 3. Moves the column viewer to the top of the column. CHORD B 9. Moves the column viewer to the bottom of the column. CHORD B *. Moves the column viewer to the previous position. Press this chord twice to go back 2 positions. B THEN CHORD B 1. Moves to column 1. B THEN CHORD B 2. Moves to column 2. B THEN CHORD B 3. Moves to column 3. B THEN CHORD B 4. Moves to column 4. B THEN CHORD B 5. Moves to column 5. B THEN CHORD B 6. Moves to column 6. B THEN CHORD B 7. Moves to column 7. B THEN CHORD B 8. Moves to column 8. B THEN CHORD B 9. Moves to column 9. B THEN CHORD B A N. Reassigns a column number. For example, if you find that you frequently use the eleventh column on a screen, you might find it convenient to assign the eleventh column to B THEN CHORD B 6 for ease of use. To reassign this column, move the pointer to any word in the eleventh text column and press B THEN CHORD B A. You will be prompted to press a number between 1 and 9. Press 6. You can now use B THEN CHORD B 6 to jump to column 11.

NOTE: Key sequences B THEN CHORD B 1 through B THEN CHORD B 9 are the go-to keys. If you want to reset the go-to keys to their default functions, use CHORD B 0 to hear the Customization menu, then choose option 4.

CUSTOMIZATION MENU

When you are working with complex screen formats, you might not be satisfied with the columns established automatically with the column viewer. Therefore, the column viewer provides a manual mode that enables you to define the left and right edges of your column view at specific positions.

Press CHORD B 0 to use the Customization menu. This menu has four options:

1. Cycle auto and manual modes. 2. Define left and right edge strings. 3. Report the status of options 1 and 2. 4. Reset the go-to keys to their defaults.

When you are in manual mode, CHORD B A is the only key sequence that automatically selects column boundaries. When you press CHORD B A in manual mode, a prompt asks if you want to use the current edge-string definitions. If you press key 2 for "No," you are prompted to define the characters on the left and right edges. In manual mode, CHORD B 4 and CHORD B 6 are used to define the left and right edges, respectively. (In automatic mode, these chords are used to move the column viewer left and right.)

The position of these edges will not change under any circumstance while moving the column view up and down. Also, you cannot move the column view left or right in manual mode.

The top and bottom of the screen define the top and bottom of the column while in manual mode.

The last option on the Customization menu is used to reset all of the column assignments you made with key sequence B THEN CHORD B A.

NOTE: For detailed information on the column-viewer feature, refer to the "User Interface" section of the SMARTCOL.KPD file in the \SRD22 directory.

EDIT FACILITY

The edit facility enables Screen Reader/2 to announce text automatically, based on cursor movements. It has two main functions, browsing and echoing, each with several modes. In addition, there are several related options and switches.

Browsing is used primarily for reading. The browse modes, Line Browse and Column Browse, enable you to hear the character, word, or line at the cursor, depending on how the cursor has moved and which mode is active. Only one browse mode may be active at a time.

Echoing is used primarily for writing. The echo modes announce what you just typed, character by character, one word at a time, or line by line. Multiple echo modes may be active simultaneously.

NOTE: Only Character Echo is available while typing or moving the cursor outside the viewport; all other browse and echo modes remain inactive until the cursor returns inside the viewport.

Several edit switches and options are also available. These options enable you to do the following:

1. Stop unwanted verbalization.

2. Add margin alerts.

3. Modify the response to the BACKSPACE and DELETE keys.

4. Modify the delete look-ahead feature.

5. Turn function-key processing On or Off.

6. Set the browse talking level.

7. Disable or enable the edit facility for individual controls.

8. Hear the current selection of active edit functions.

9. Toggle the current edit selection On or Off.

10. Turn on edit defaults.

All edit facility functions start with the D key or with a chord containing the D key.

NOTE: The edit facility is not available in DOS full-screen sessions.

BROWSES

This section discusses the Line Browse and Column Browse key sequences and functions.

LINE BROWSE

D THEN *. Toggles Line Browse On or Off.

Each time you move the cursor when Line Browse is on, Screen Reader/2 reads the character, the word, or the line at the cursor, depending on which direction you move the cursor.

If you move the cursor horizontally character by character, Screen Reader/2 reads the new character at the cursor after each movement.

If an application allows you to move horizontally a word at a time (for example, using CTRL+RIGHT ARROW or CTRL+LEFT ARROW), Screen Reader/2 reads the new word at the cursor after each movement.

If you move the cursor vertically or diagonally, Screen Reader/2 reads the new cursor line after each movement. If the cursor movement causes the text to scroll vertically, you may experience a slight delay before Line Browse reads the new line to you.

Line Browse responds also to character deletions using the BACKSPACE and DELETE keys.

NOTE: When Line Browse is activated, Column Browse is automatically turned off.

COLUMN BROWSE

D THEN 0. Toggles Column Browse On or Off.

Column Browse is almost identical to Line Browse except that if you move vertically or diagonally, instead of reading lines, it reads the word or the partial word, starting at the cursor position. This feature was designed primarily for text that is formatted in columns. Column Browse works best with monospaced fonts.

If the cursor movement causes the text to scroll vertically, you may experience a slight delay before Column Browse reads the new word to you.

NOTE: When Column Browse is activated, Line Browse is automatically turned off.

ECHOES

This section discusses the echo functions: Character, Word, and Line.

CHARACTER ECHO

D THEN 7. Toggles Character Echo On or Off.

With Character Echo On, Screen Reader/2 announces each printable character immediately after you type it. Screen Reader/2 does not announce non-printable characters such as TAB or ENTER.

Character Echo also responds to character deletions using the BACKSPACE and DELETE keys.

WORD ECHO

D THEN 8. Toggles Word Echo On or Off.

With Word Echo On, Screen Reader/2 announces a complete word. Screen Reader/2 uses a press of any of these keys: SPACEBAR, TAB, ENTER or any of the directional arrow keys to delimit a word.

Word Echo also responds to character deletions using the BACKSPACE and DELETE keys.

LINE ECHO

D THEN 9. Toggles Line Echo On or Off.

With Line Echo On, Screen Reader/2 reads the line just typed as soon as the cursor moves to a different line.

EDIT SWITCHES AND OPTIONS

This section discusses the switches and options available with the edit facility:

Flush. Edit Status. Edit Selection. Edit Defaults. Margin Alerts.

Edit Status. Character-Deletion Feedback. Function Keys On or Off. Toggle Edit for Controls. Browse Talking Level.

FLUSH

D THEN B. Toggles Flush On or Off.

When you move the cursor with Flush On, the text being spoken is stopped as soon as the movement is complete and immediately before Screen Reader/2 verbalizes the text at the new position. Flush is active only when a browse or echo mode is turned on.

For example, if you are browsing a document for a certain line, you may peruse the text line by line, using the UP ARROW and DOWN ARROW keys with Line Browse turned on. When Flush is Off, each time you move down one line, you must listen to the entire line before you can listen to the next one. With Flush On, when you recognize that the line is not the one you want, you can move the cursor to the next line. Screen Reader/2 immediately stops reading the previous line so you may hear the current line without delay. The default is Flush Off.

EDIT STATUS

D THEN C. Announces the currently active browse and echo modes, as well as the status of related switches.

EDIT SELECTION ON OR OFF

D THEN #. Toggles current selections.

Turns On or Off all current browse and echo modes.

EDIT DEFAULTS

D THEN D. Switches to the default edit facility, turning Line Browse On, echoes Off, and Flush On.

MARGIN ALERTS

You can monitor the progress of the cursor across the text-editing area with a variety of edit facility beeps and verbal cues. This section discusses how to select a margin alert and how to set the boundary or starting position.

NOTE: This feature is available only if browse mode or echo mode is turned on.

Alert Types

CHORD D 8. Cycles through alert types:

Simple alert: A single beep when the threshold position is crossed.

Multiple alerts: A beep when the threshold position is crossed and every five characters to the right of it. Beeps are more frequent if there are less than twenty characters left from the threshold position to the end of the line. The edit facility will attempt to beep at least five times per line.

Composite alerts: A beep and a verbal cue when the threshold position is crossed and every five characters to the right of it. The verbal cue announces the current cursor position. Alerts are more frequent if there are less than twenty characters left from the margin to the end of the line. The edit facility will attempt to issue an alert at least five times per line.

No alerts.

NOTE: The default is no alerts. The default alert margin is at the 60th character position.

Move Margin Alert to the Left

CHORD D 7. Shifts the margin alert to the left by one character. For example, if the margin alert is at its default setting of the 60th character, pressing this key sequence resets it to the 59th character.

Move Margin Alert to the Right

CHORD D 9. Shifts the margin alert to the right by one character. For example, if the margin alert is at its default setting of the 60th character, pressing this key sequence resets it to the 61st character.

CHARACTER-DELETION FEEDBACK

Echo modes respond to character deletions by echoing characters, partial words, or complete words. This section discusses how to use and customize this feature.

Deletion-Feedback Types

CHORD D C THEN 7. Cycles through deletion-feedback types.

When you use the DELETE key or the destructive BACKSPACE key in conjunction with echoes, you can choose one of the following three types of feedback:

The DELETE key echoes the new character at the cursor position. The destructive BACKSPACE key echoes the character being removed.

The DELETE key echoes a partial word starting at the cursor position. The destructive BACKSPACE key echoes the character being removed.

The DELETE and destructive BACKSPACE keys echo the whole word at the cursor.

The default is for the DELETE key to echo the new character at the cursor and for the destructive BACKSPACE key to echo the character being removed.

NOTE: Deletion feedback is not available if Line Echo is the only active echo mode and no browses are active.

Cycle Length of Deletion Look-Ahead

CHORD D C THEN 9. Cycles through lengths of the deletion look-ahead (3 through 20).

If a line contains repeating characters and you delete several, Screen Reader/2 may not be able to detect that characters were deleted, because the character at the cursor position does not change. For example, if a line contains nine asterisks and you delete five, the character at the cursor position is still an asterisk. However, Screen Reader/2 provides a deletion look-ahead feature. You can set the number of characters that you want Screen Reader/2 to look ahead. This number can be from 3 to 20; the default length of the deletion look-ahead is 3. When you set the look-ahead size, Screen Reader/2 looks ahead that number of characters to see if text has changed. Thus, it can detect that characters were deleted.

Announce Length of Deletion Look-Ahead

CHORD D C THEN 8. Announces the length of the deletion look-ahead.

FUNCTION KEYS ON OR OFF

CHORD D C THEN C. Toggles function-keys processing On or Off.

By using this feature, you can decide whether browse modes ignore function-key combinations or process them like other keys. When function-keys processing is turned Off, the edit facility ignores cursor movements caused by function-key combinations. When it is on, the edit facility processes cursor movements caused by function-key presses. Screen Reader/2 will speak according to the rules of echo and browse modes. The default is Off.

TOGGLE EDIT FOR CONTROLS

CHORD D C THEN O. Enables and disables the edit facility for controls.

If you are navigating menus, notebooks, and other controls with a browse mode turned on, you might encounter a situation in which both the Presentation Manager profile and the edit facility are talking at the same time. To avoid this, place the cursor at the location where the duplicate verbalization is occurring and press CHORD D C THEN 0. This toggles the edit facility off for that control only.

If, on the other hand, you find that the edit facility is quiet when you would expect it to work, place the cursor on the control in question and press CHORD D C THEN 0. This activates the edit facility for that control and the control will now be read whenever the cursor travels over it.

You can have a maximum of 128 controls active at one time. If you try to add more than that, Screen Reader/2 announces that the list is full, removes the last control from the list, and adds the current one.

BROWSE TALKING LEVEL

CHORD D C THEN D. Toggles the browse talking level.

There are two talking levels available in browse modes: moderate and chatty. Moderate is the default.

When the browse talking level is set to moderate, Screen Reader/2 reads text only when a cursor movement is directly caused by a key press. As a result, when a single key press causes a series of cursor movements, Screen Reader/2 might not read the line the cursor is on at the end of the process. For example, when you press ENTER in a 3270 terminal-emulation session, the cursor can move through a number of screen refreshes before it finally comes to rest. In the moderate browse talking level, Screen Reader/2 will read the result of the first cursor movement, which may be a blank, but nothing after that.

When the browse talking level is set to chatty, verbalization is triggered by all cursor movements, even when these are not directly caused by a key press. You may find chatty browse level especially helpful in a 3270 terminal-emulation session.

SAVING YOUR SETTINGS

You can use the edit facility settings that you define any time during the session in which you defined them. However, if you end the session or turn off your computer, the definitions are erased.

To save your edit facility settings for use at another time, use key sequence B THEN *. Refer to the section "Saving Your Screen Reader/2 Settings" for more information on this topic.

ADVANCED FUNCTIONS

Screen Reader/2 provides you with many convenient and helpful features. The tutorial introduced you to the primary functions; the following sections discuss functions that will help you to work more productively. You may not need these functions when you first start using Screen Reader/2, but they can be useful as you become more proficient in using the system.

ADVANCED READING KEY SEQUENCES

The following sections discuss key sequences that make Screen Reader/2 read the screen for you:

Characters. First, Middle, and Last Word. Rest of a Word. Rest of a Line. Sentences. Current Paragraph. Read Fields. Format Shortcuts.

CHARACTERS

0 THEN 7. Reads the character in the line above the current cursor or pointer location. 0 THEN 9. Reads the character in the line below the current cursor or pointer location.

FIRST, MIDDLE, AND LAST WORD

B THEN 1. Reads the first word of the current line. B THEN 2. Reads the middle word of the current line. B THEN 3. Reads the last word of the current line.

THE REST OF A WORD

Screen Reader/2 enables you to read the rest of the current word, as well as the rest of the word directly above and below it. This function is useful when you work with columns of information.

B THEN 4. Reads the rest of the word above the current cursor or pointer location. B THEN 5. Reads the rest of the word at the current cursor or pointer location.

B THEN 6. Reads the rest of the word below the current cursor or pointer location.

THE REST OF A LINE

0 THEN C. Reads from the current cursor or pointer location to the end of the line.

SENTENCES

You can read complete sentences with Screen Reader/2. The definition of a Screen Reader/2 sentence is:

It ends with a period, question mark, or exclamation mark, and can be preceded and followed by a single or double quote.

It must be preceded by another complete sentence, a blank line, or the top of the viewport. It also must be followed by another sentence, a blank line, or the bottom of the viewport.

Its ending punctuation is followed by either one or two spaces, as defined with key sequence CHORD D 2. (Screen Reader/2 treats multiple spaces in Presentation Manager applications as single spaces).

D THEN 1. Reads the previous sentence. D THEN 2. Reads the current sentence. D THEN 3. Reads the next sentence. CHORD D 2. Toggles between one and two spaces as part of the definition of the end of a sentence. The default is two spaces.

NOTE: A blank line, the screen top, or the screen bottom also signal the beginning or ending of a sentence.

CURRENT PARAGRAPH

A paragraph is any text between two blank lines or between a window boundary (top or bottom) and a blank line.

D THEN A. Reads the current paragraph.

READ FIELDS

A field is a contiguous area of the display with the same attributes. An attribute determines how an item appears on the screen, such as color, font, underlining, blinking, and so forth. Therefore, a field can be one character, several characters, a line, several lines, or an entire screen.

Using Screen Reader/2, you can read the previous, current, and next fields, and the rest of the current field. You can also specify the characteristics that Screen Reader/2 uses to determine a field. The first four key sequences, * THEN 1, * THEN 2, * THEN 3, and * THEN A, are useful, for example, for reading menus that ask for input into highlighted fields.

Use key sequences * THEN H and CHORD * H to change the way Screen Reader/2 defines a field. You can specify that Screen Reader/2 uses only the background color, only the foreground color, both foreground and background colors, or no color when it determines a field. (You should specify no color if you only want to use font information.)

For example, if an application has a menu on which the choices all appear with the same background color, but the first letter of each choice is a different color, you can set the field definition to background. In this case, Screen Reader/2 reads the entire word as a field rather than considering the first letter and the rest of the word as separate fields.

You can also ask Screen Reader/2 to include font changes in the field definition. A font is the style of letters used to display information. Usually, a document will be displayed all in one font, such as Helvetica, Courier, or Bookman. A different font might be used within a document to draw attention to a particular character or word.

The default field definition is the mixture of attributes (foreground and background) with font changes ignored.

The previous, current, and next fields are relative to the cursor or pointer location for the following key sequences:

  • THEN 1. Reads the previous field.
  • THEN 2. Reads the current field.
  • THEN 3. Reads the next field.
  • THEN A. Reads the rest of the current field.
  • THEN H. Cycles through the field definitions:

foreground, background, both, or neither. CHORD * A. Announces the font definition of the current character. CHORD * H. Toggles between font changes not defining a new field (the default) and defining a new field.

FORMAT SHORTCUTS

The following key sequences are reading shortcuts. They save time because you do not have to switch from your active format to the spell or phonetic format and then switch back; Screen Reader/2 does it for you automatically.

For example, if you are using text format to read, pressing * THEN 5 spells the word at the current pointer or cursor position, then Screen Reader/2 switches back to text format.

SPELLING SHORTCUTS

The following key sequences enable you to spell words quickly:

  • THEN 4. Spells the previous word.
  • THEN 5. Spells the current word.
  • THEN 6. Spells the next word.
  • THEN B. Spells the current word with capital letters announced.

PHONETIC SHORTCUTS

When you have trouble understanding a particular character or word, you can use the phonetic shortcut keys to help you determine what the synthesizer is saying.

The phonetic alphabet uses a word beginning with the same letter to represent each character in our regular alphabet.

PHONETIC ALPHABET

Alpha        | Bravo        | Charlie      | Delta
Echo         | Foxtrot      | Golf         | Hotel
India        | Juliet       | Kilo         | Lima
Mike         | November     | Oscar        | Papa
Quebec       | Romeo        | Sierra       | Tango
Uniform      | Victor       | Whiskey      | X-ray
Yankee       | Zulu

You can use key sequence * THEN D to switch to the phonetic format, or use the following key sequences to hear a phonetic representation of just the previous, current, and next characters.

  • THEN 7. Spells the previous character using the phonetic alphabet.
  • THEN 8. Spells the current character using the phonetic alphabet.
  • THEN 9. Spells the next character using the phonetic alphabet.

ANNOUNCING VALUES

This section discusses key sequences that announce the following values:

ASCII Character Value. Color of Character. Icons. Text Attributes.

ASCII CHARACTER VALUE

  • THEN C. Announces the ASCII value of the current

character.

COLOR OF CHARACTER

0 THEN 8. Announces the color of the character at the current cursor or pointer location.

Screen Reader/2 tells you the foreground color, then the background color of the current character. For example, Screen Reader/2 might say, "White on black."

ICONS

You can choose the way Screen Reader/2 announces icons which are the pictures that represent the items you want to work with, such as application programs, data files, and printers. This function is called Icon Scanning.

You can set Icon Scanning to read all icons, the icons it knows (or recognizes), or no icons. You may also change the name of an icon or give an unknown icon a name.

The following key sequences are used to change the way that icons on your screen are announced:

CHORD D *. Toggles the announcing of icons to All, Known, or Not Speaking Icons. If set to All, and an icon is not known by Screen Reader/2, you hear only "icon." If set to Known, and an icon is recognized by Screen Reader/2 you hear the icon name. If set to Not Speaking Icons, and an icon is not known by Screen Reader/2, you hear only "blank." CHORD D 0. Announces the current status of icon speaking (All, Known, or Not Speaking Icons). CHORD D #. Associates a text string with the current icon to identify it.

TEXT ATTRIBUTES

Screen Reader/2 can announce the appearance of text as it is reading the screen. It can describe capitalization, color, and font information.

Screen Reader/2 announces capitalization when you turn Caps Scan On with CHORD A 4. Here's how it works. If Caps Scan is On, Screen Reader/2 announces capital letters or mixed case as it reads. For example, if a word contains one capital letter, Screen Reader/2 announces "Caps" followed by the word. If a word contains a combination of capital and lower-case letters Screen Reader/2 announces "Mixed" followed by the word. The default for Caps Scan is Off.

Screen Reader/2 can announce colors as it is reading the screen. For example, many editors use white on dark blue as the default. If you set Color Scan On, by using CHORD 0 8, you hear those colors announced if they are changed. You can set Color Scan Off to stop hearing the colors announced. You can move the cursor or pointer (depending on which mode you are in) to a place on the screen where the default color is displayed and press CHORD 0 7. This key sequence sets the default color. The next time you highlight text, such as with bold or underline, the editor will (for most programs) change the color of the highlighted text and announce the new color. The default for Color Scan is Off.

Screen Reader/2 announces font changes when you turn Font Scan On with CHORD 0 2. Here's how it works. If Font Scan is On, Screen Reader/2 scans for font changes in Presentation Manager and Windows applications. If you change a font or type style, Screen Reader/2 announces that change. If you change a point size you hear the point size of each character. The default for Font Scan is Off.

Key sequences used for scanning:

CHORD 0 7. Toggles setting and clearing the default color. CHORD 0 8. Toggles Color Scan On or Off. CHORD A 3. Announces the status for scan. CHORD A 4. Toggles Caps Scan On or Off. CHORD A 7. Cycles through mixed case handling: Says cap before each capital letter. Says mixed and cap. Says cap only to separate words. Says mixed only (default) CHORD * 2. Toggles Font Scan On or Off.

IGNORING CHARACTERS

You can instruct Screen Reader/2 to ignore characters on the screen. Ignoring characters is useful, for example, when a program uses a line of equals signs as a boundary between sections. An ignored character is treated as a blank.

  1. THEN H. Starts ignoring characters you specify.

CHORD # H. Stops ignoring characters you specify. CHORD # S. Stops ignoring all characters previously specified.

After pressing key sequence # THEN H or CHORD # H, type the characters (without any spaces between them) that you want Screen Reader/2 to start or stop ignoring, and then press ENTER.

MOUSE SIMULATION

Screen Reader/2 can simulate the actions of a mouse, and announce the status of mouse toggles and the window containing the mouse pointer.

Key sequences used for mouse movement are:

CHORD 2 3 THEN 1. Toggles moving the mouse to follow the Screen Reader/2 pointer On or Off. CHORD 2 3 THEN 3. Toggles mouse tracking On or Off (described following this list). CHORD 2 3 THEN 4. Simulates a single click on mouse button 1. CHORD 2 3 THEN 5. Simulates a double click on mouse button 1. CHORD 2 3 THEN 6. Simulates a single click on mouse button 2. CHORD 2 3 THEN 8. Announces the window containing the mouse pointer. CHORD 2 3 THEN A. Moves the mouse pointer to the Screen Reader/2 pointer. CHORD 2 3 THEN C. Cycles through the following three mouse movements: Horizontal mouse movement only. Vertical mouse movement only. Both vertical and horizontal mouse movement. (This is the default.) CHORD 2 3 THEN H. Announces the status of mouse settings (mouse movement with pointer, mouse tracking, and mouse movement settings).

When mouse tracking is On, speech occurs when the mouse pointer moves to new text, over an icon for a minimized application, or over a title. The click-key sequences of

the mouse button perform the action where the mouse pointer is located. If mouse tracking is Off, the mouse pointer moves to the Screen Reader/2 pointer and the clicking action is performed. The mouse-tracking default is Off.

When mouse movement with the Screen Reader/2 pointer is On, the mouse pointer moves to the location of what you are hearing when the pointer changes. The default is Off.

NOTE: You must have a mouse installed to use the mouse key sequences.

MOVING THE POINTER

In the tutorial, you learned to move the pointer by reading characters, words, and lines; by moving the pointer to the cursor; and by reading specific lines. Three ways to move the pointer directly to specific areas of the view follow:

0 THEN D. Moves the pointer to the right edge of the view at the current line. 0 THEN #. Moves the pointer to the bottom-left corner of the view. 0 THEN *. Moves the pointer to the top-left corner of the view.

SEARCHING BACKWARDS

In the tutorial, you learned how to search forward for a string of characters from the top of the view by using key sequences # THEN 1, # THEN 2, and # THEN 3. You can also search backward for a string from the bottom of the view by using the following chords.

CHORD # 1. Searches backward for a string from the bottom of the view. You are prompted to enter the string to be found. CHORD # 2. Continues backward search. CHORD # 3. Searches backward for the same string from the bottom of the view. (If you have changed pages, this chord searches from the bottom of the new view.)

SETTING SWITCHES

Screen Reader/2 contains several "switches" that you can turn On or Off for the following features:

A THEN 4. Caps. A THEN 5. Spaces. A THEN 6. Dictionary.

A THEN 7. Pause. A THEN 8. Wrap. A THEN 9. Numbering. A THEN 0. ForceSpell. A THEN B. Graphics. A THEN #. Status of switches (On or Off). A THEN *. KeyEcho.

  • THEN B. Spell current word with capitals.
  1. THEN B. Keyboard lock-key status.

CHORD A 0. SpellCaps. CHORD A 6. Trailing.

CAPS

A THEN 4. Toggles Caps On or Off.

The Caps switch setting tells Screen Reader/2 what to do when it spells a word containing capital letters. With Caps On, capital letters are preceded by the word cap. Caps Off is the default; all characters are treated as lowercase.

SPACES

A THEN 5. Toggles Spaces On or Off.

The Spaces switch setting tells Screen Reader/2 whether or not to announce spaces when you are in spell, phonetic, or pronounce formats.

The default number of spaces to be announced between words is one or more. You can change this default by using CHORD A 5 THEN N. n is the number of spaces that you want Screen Reader/2 to announce between words. Fewer than n are not announced. Refer to the description of Trailing in this section.

Spaces Off is the default.

DICTIONARY

A THEN 6. Toggles Dictionary On or Off.

If you would like certain words to be read differently from the way the synthesizer currently says them, you can add, to the Screen Reader/2 dictionary, these words and the replacement words that you want Screen Reader/2 to read. With Dictionary On in text or pronounce formats, Screen Reader/2 looks in the dictionary for alphabetic parts of words. If it finds a word, it sends the dictionary-replacement word to the synthesizer.

For example, OS (for Operating System) is included in your dictionary list of words. Because your synthesizer might read it as "OZ," the replacement word "O S" provides the correct pronunciation to be used.

You can add your own words to the list, delete words, or change them by using the Screen Reader/2 Message Settings notebook.

Dictionary On is the default.

GRAPHICS

A THEN B. Toggles Graphics On or Off.

The Graphics switch tells Screen Reader/2 how to treat box characters.

When Graphics is On and text (including box characters) is spoken, Screen Reader/2 announces the name of the box character.

Graphics Off is the default.

PAUSE

A THEN 7. Toggles Pause On or Off.

The Pause switch setting tells Screen Reader/2 whether or not to hesitate between words.

Pause Off is the default.

WRAP

A THEN 8. Toggles Wrap On or Off.

When the Wrap switch is On, Screen Reader/2 does not recognize the right edge of the viewport as the end of a line. Instead, it reads from the current position (cursor or pointer) to the bottom of the viewport.

Wrap Off is the default.

NUMBERING

A THEN 9. Toggles Numbering On or Off.

When Numbering is on, Screen Reader/2 announces the line number as each line is spoken for the remainder of the viewport.

Numbering Off is the default.

FORCESPELL

A THEN 0. Toggles ForceSpell On or Off.

The ForceSpell setting causes Screen Reader/2 to either spell or pronounce a word that has no vowels. When ForceSpell is On, Screen Reader/2 spells any word without a vowel. When ForceSpell is Off, these words are spoken.

This switch is important when your synthesizer is reading numbers or abbreviations. For example, you may want ForceSpell Off if your synthesizer announces numbers such as 9600 as ninety-six hundred instead of nine six zero zero, or if it announces abbreviations such as Mr. as "mister" instead of "m r dot."

ForceSpell On is the default.

Screen Reader/2 spells the word at the current cursor or pointer location. When Screen Reader/2 encounters a capital letter, it prefaces that letter with the word cap.

SPELLCAPS

CHORD A 0. Toggles SpellCaps On or Off.

With SpellCaps On, words with all capital letters are spelled instead of pronounced.

SpellCaps Off is the default.

TRAILING

CHORD A 6. Toggles Trailing On or Off.

The Trailing switch setting tells Screen Reader/2 whether or not it should read the characters trailing the end of a word or line. Spaces must be On and your format must be pronounce, spell, or phonetic.

For example, if you request that the OS/2 [C:\] prompt be read--with Spaces and Trailing On and in spell format--you hear "left bracket C colon backslash right bracket awe 75 spaces."

The word-definition setting determines what is considered "trailing".

Trailing Off is the default.

NOTE: The word awe signals that a character is repeated three or more times in succession. Awe was chosen because it is a short word and a word that you probably will not encounter often. The need for a word such as awe to denote repetitive characters can be demonstrated using the "75 spaces" example. "75 spaces," the text spoken by your synthesizer, could literally be on the screen. When you hear the word awe preceding it, you know that Screen Reader/2 counted the occurrences of the repetitive character and is telling you the number. The word awe precedes all character repetitions of three or more, not just when the Trailing switch is On.

KEY ECHO

A THEN *. Toggles Key Echo On or Off.

The Key Echo switch setting tells Screen Reader/2 whether or not it should echo the key that is pressed.

Key Echo Off is the default.

NOTE: Key Echo is not available in DOS full-screen sessions.

STATUS OF SWITCHES

A THEN #. Announces the status of switches.

Screen Reader/2 tells you which switches are not at their default settings.

WORD-DEFINITION SETTINGS

A THEN C. Cycles through the following word definitions:

Alphabetic. Alphanumeric. Nonblank.

In Screen Reader/2, the default definition of a word is a nonblank string followed by trailing blanks.

To save your Screen Reader/2 switch settings, use B THEN

  • . Refer to Saving Screen Reader/2 Settings for more

information on this topic.

STATUS INFORMATION

Using a keypad key sequence, you can request the status of the keyboard lock keys and some Screen Reader/2 modes, formats, cursor and pointer positions, and viewport boundaries.

LOCK KEYS

  1. THEN 4. Announces the status of the following keys:

Caps Lock. Num Lock. Scroll Lock.

  1. THEN B. Toggles the announcing of lock status On or

Off.

NOTE: This feature is not available in full-screen sessions.

CURRENT FORMAT

  1. THEN 5. Announces the current format (text, pronounce,

spell, phonetic).

CURRENT VIEWPORT BOUNDARIES

  1. THEN 6. Announces the current viewport boundaries.

When you are in a text view, you hear the top, left, bottom, and right row and column settings, in that order. When you are in a Presentation Manager or seamless Windows view, you hear bottom, left, top, and right pixel settings, in that order.

CURRENT MODE AND POSITION

  1. THEN 9. Announces the current mode (cursor or pointer).

In cursor mode, you hear the location of the cursor; in pointer mode, you hear the location of the pointer.

CURSOR/POINTER LOCATION

  1. THEN C. Announces the cursor location (line and

column).

  1. THEN 8. Announces the pointer location (line and

column).

POP-UP KEYPAD

With the advent of laptop computers, you can take your work with you when you leave the office. Now, you can also take Screen Reader/2 with you! Screen Reader/2 enables you to set up a pop-up keypad so you can enter all of the keypad key sequences on your keyboard.

The pop-up keypad is a block of sixteen keys on the keyboard that corresponds to the Screen Reader/2 keypad. The pop-up keypad is set up to work on the left side of your keyboard, but you can set up the keys on the right side of your keyboard, if you prefer. Refer to the section "Arranging the Pop-Up Keypad Keys" for more information.

NOTE: The Screen Reader/2 keypad is always active and is not affected by the pop-up keypad.

You can also redefine pop-up keypad keys to other keyboard keys. This enables you to set up your pop-up keypad anywhere on your keyboard. For example, you might prefer your keypad to be defined on the numeric keypad.

NOTE: The pop-up keypad is not available in DOS full-screen sessions and some error panels. Therefore, if you are using DOS applications, you should run them only in a DOS window.

USING THE POP-UP KEYPAD

When the pop-up keypad is active on the keyboard, you can work in one of two modes: 1) you can read with Screen Reader/2 or, 2) you can work with an application. The two modes are mutually exclusive. For example, when you use WordPerfect to create a document, there are various function keys that perform actions such as moving blocks of text, highlighting text, and so on. When the pop-up keypad is active, these function keys are disabled. Therefore, you must toggle between the pop-up keypad and the regular keyboard to work with the document.

To use the pop-up keypad, press CHORD A 1 THEN B to toggle the Hot key on. (The Hot key is the keyboard key sequence used to enable or disable the pop-up keypad.) Then press and release ALT+SHIFT together to make the pop-up keypad active. To re-enable the normal keyboard functions, press and release ALT+SHIFT again.

POP-UP KEYPAD DEFAULTS

Unless you specify otherwise, the pop-up keypad has the following defaults:

The pop-up keypad is active on the left side of the keyboard.

The Hot key is ALT+SHIFT; the Stop key is CTRL.

The default for the Hot key and the Stop key is Off.

When you activate the pop-up keypad using the Hot key, you hear "Pop-up." When you deactivate the pop-up keypad, you hear "Pop-down."

Each time you press a key on the pop-up keypad, you hear a low-pitched beep.

When the pop-up keypad is active, pressing any other keyboard key causes a high-pitched beep, which indicates an error.

The typing area of the keyboard is disabled while the pop-up keypad is active.

CHANGING THE KEYPAD DEFAULTS

You can change some of the pop-up keypad defaults by using the following key sequences:

CHORD A 1 THEN 0. Announces the values from the last key pressed (flag byte, scan code, and character code in decimal). Refer to the PAL Reference, "System Statements", for details about these values. CHORD A 1 THEN 1. Toggles between the pop-up keypad being active on the left side or the right side of the keyboard. CHORD A 1 THEN 2. Cycles through Hot key and Stop key choices. (This key sequence is provided to help you avoid conflict with your applications. For example, if the application you are running uses the ALT key to jump to the action bar, you cannot use the ALT key for the Stop key, because the application takes precedence over the Screen Reader/2 key assignment.)

The choices are: 1. CTRL+SHIFT for Hot key; ALT for Stop key.

2. ALT+CTRL for Hot key; SHIFT for Stop key. 3. ALT+SHIFT for Hot key; CTRL for Stop key.

NOTE: In Presentation Manager application programs, do not use choice 1, CTRL+SHIFT for Hot key; ALT for Stop key. The reason is all PM application programs use the ALT key for menu operations. Screen Reader/2 cannot recognize the ALT key. This causes a situation where it seems to Screen Reader/2 that the Stop key is held down and any key sequence you try subsequently is recognized as a chord with the Stop key.

CHORD A 1 THEN 3. Toggles between audible feedback when you are using the pop-up keys (the default) or no feedback. The feedback includes what you hear when you use the Hot key ("pop-up" or "pop-down"), when you use the pop-up keypad keys (a low-pitched beep), and when you press a keyboard key that is not on the pop-up keypad (a high-pitched beep). CHORD A 1 THEN 4. Toggles between disabling only the keyboard keys of the pop-up keypad or the entire typing area of the keyboard while the pop-up keypad is active (the default). This means that while the pop-up keypad is active, the default is that nothing you type will be displayed on the screen. CHORD A 1 THEN 5. Announces the status of the pop-up keypad settings. The status tells you the following: 1. Whether the pop-up keypad is active or inactive. 2. Whether the Hot key is enabled or disabled. 3. The keys you are using for the Hot key and the Stop key. 4. Whether the location of the pop-up keypad is left, right, or user-defined. 5. Whether just the keyboard keys of the pop-up keypad are disabled or whether the entire typing area of the keyboard is disabled.

6. Whether audible feedback will be heard when the pop-up keypad is active. CHORD A 1 THEN B. Toggles the Hot key On or Off. (The default is Off.) CHORD A 2 THEN N. Redefines pop-up keypad key n to another keyboard key. CHORD A 2 THEN S. Stops redefining pop-up keypad key n.

NOTE: If you hear "undefined" when you press a key sequence that you know is defined, you may have inadvertently pressed either ALT+ESC, CTRL+ESC, or SHIFT+ESC while the pop-up keypad was active. These keyboard key sequences should not be used when you are using the pop-up keypad.

To correct the problem, press each ALT, CTRL, and SHIFT key on your keyboard once to reset it.

ARRANGING POP-UP KEYPAD KEYS

Screen Reader/2 enables you to use either the left or right side of the keyboard for the pop-up keypad. The default is for the pop-up keypad to be on the left side.

The keypad keys on the left side of the keyboard have this arrangement:

The keyboard keys 1, 2, 3, and 4 correspond to keypad keys 1, 2, 3, and A. The keyboard keys Q, W, E, and R correspond to keypad keys 4, 5, 6, and B. The keyboard keys A, S, D, and F correspond to keypad keys 7, 8, 9, and C. The keyboard keys Z, X, C, and V correspond to keypad keys *, 0, #, and D. The keyboard key TAB corresponds to the keypad key HELP. The keyboard key CTRL corresponds to the keypad key STOP.

If you prefer to set up the keypad keys on the right side of the keyboard, you can select the following arrangement using CHORD A 1 THEN 1:

The keyboard keys 7, 8, 9, and 0 correspond to keypad keys 1, 2, 3, and A. The keyboard keys U, I, O, and P correspond to keypad keys 4, 5, 6, and B. The keyboard keys J, K, L, and ; correspond to keypad keys 7, 8, 9, and C. The keyboard keys M, ,, ., and / correspond to keypad keys *, 0, #, and D. The keyboard key ENTER corresponds to the keypad key HELP.

The keyboard key CTRL corresponds to the keypad key STOP.

If you prefer to set up the keypad keys in another location (such as the numeric keypad), use key sequence CHORD A 2 THEN N.

ACTIVATING THE POP-UP KEYPAD AUTOMATICALLY

If you want the pop-up keypad to be active when you start Screen Reader/2, you need to follow these steps with the keypad attached:

1. Press CHORD A 1 THEN B to activate the Hot key.

2. Specify your pop-up keypad preferences (where you want your keypad located on your keyboard, the key you want to use for the Hot key, and so forth).

3. If you want the pop-up keypad available as you start Screen Reader/2, press key sequence B THEN * to save your current settings.

NOTE:

1. If the keypad is not attached to your system the next time you start your computer, an error message will be displayed requiring you to press ENTER to continue the startup process. Depending on how you plan to use your system, there are two ways to deal with this error.

The first method is recommended if you plan to use the keypad only occasionally. To avoid having to press ENTER during the startup process, you can add the following statement to the beginning of the CONFIG.SYS file:

pauseonerror=no

The second method is recommended if you plan to use the pop-up keypad exclusively. You can add the word rem to the beginning of the line that reads:

x:\srd22\keypad.sys

x is the drive on which Screen Reader/2 is installed.

2. If the keypad is not attached to your system the next time you start Screen Reader/2, you will hear a warning message. However, Screen Reader/2 will still start. If you do not want the warning message to be spoken, change the

Keypad option to No in the Message Settings Notebook.

ALTERNATIVE METHOD

There is an alternative way to start the pop-up keypad. You can remove the two dashes (-- --) from the line of the KEYPAD.KPD file that reads:

-- -- keypad_enable:= true;

After saving the modified KEYPAD.KPD file, type PAL SRD2 at the SRD22 directory prompt. Then restart Screen Reader/2. Now the pop-up keypad is active when you start Screen Reader/2.

LEVELS OF TALKING

You can set the level, or amount, of talking that you want Screen Reader/2 to do when you are using many of the application profiles. When you set the level to chatty, Screen Reader/2 reads the most information, provides the fullest explanations, and gives the most feedback when changes occur. Chatty talking level is provided especially for new users.

When you set the level to moderate, Screen Reader/2 reads less information. Moderate level is the default.

When you set the level to quiet, Screen Reader/2 reads the least information. Quiet level is provided for users who are familiar with an application and who require little feedback.

For example, when you use the WordPerfect profile, chatty talking level reads the entire help window, the menu list, and the selected menu item. Moderate talking level reads the entire help window and the selected menu item. Quiet talking level reads only the help title and the selected menu item.

Explanations of what the different talking levels do for particular profiles are provided in the profile descriptions.

You can use CHORD A S to cycle through the three talking levels.

PROFILES

A profile is an ASCII text file used to control the key definitions and autospeaks for Screen Reader/2. A profile must be compiled and loaded into memory to be activated.

In Screen Reader/2, profiles are loaded into memory on a tier, which is a stack of profiles. The profile tier can change, depending on which program or process is running in the foreground. When a profile is loaded into memory on a tier, its key definitions take precedence over any other key definitions in the tier to which it is added.

In addition to the base profile, Screen Reader/2 provides profiles for a variety of software programs. These programs run under the following OS/2 2.1 environments:

DOS text. Presentation Manager. OS/2 text. Windows.

The profiles provided here were written for many popular programs. These profiles work with specific versions of the programs. We do not guarantee that the profiles will work with earlier or later versions of the programs. In addition, we may not provide profiles for earlier or later versions of the programs.

NOTE: You may be able to use a profile as the base for writing other profiles of a similar category or nature. For example, you may be able to use the Lotus 1 2 3 profile as a base for another program that would be considered a spreadsheet as well.

ADDING AND REMOVING PROFILES

You load application-specific profiles to control key sequences and autospeaks for the application started in each session. Application-specific profiles are added to the current profile tier in one of two ways:

1. Screen Reader/2 automatically adds a profile to the current tier as required for most base and extended OS/2 applications. In addition, Screen Reader/2 adds OS/2, DOS, and Windows application-specific profiles to the profile tier for applications listed in this User's Guide.

2. You can use key sequence # THEN A to add a profile to the profile tier. You can use CHORD # A to remove

the last profile from the tier. CHORD # B tells you which profiles are currently active. The first one spoken is the last one on the tier.

You can use the profiles that are provided with Screen Reader/2 as they are or you can modify them. In addition, you can create your own profiles. Use the Profile Access Language (PAL) to do this. (Refer to the PAL Reference for more information.)

LIST OF SCREEN READER/2 PROFILES

The following is an alphabetical list of all the profiles provided with Screen Reader/2. These profiles are for Presentation Manager, OS/2 text session, DOS session, or Windows programs. Each program type is noted next to the program name.

AmiPro (Windows). Base Screen Reader/2. Activities List (P M). Alarms (P M). BookManager Read/2 (P M). BookManager Read/DOS (DOS). Calculator (P M). Calculator (Windows). Calendar (P M). Command Prompt (DOS). Command Prompt (OS/2 text). Communications Manager (OS/2 text). Daily Planner (P M). DeScribe (P M). Enhanced Editor (P M). Hardware Error Pop-up (DOS). Hardware Error Pop-up (OS/2 text). Help for Windows (Windows). Installation Aid (OS/2 text). Lotus 1 2 3 (DOS). Lotus 1 2 3 (P M). Notepad (P M). Planner Archive (P M). PM Terminal (P M). Quicken (DOS). Quicken 2 (Windows). Spreadsheet (P M). Start Here (P M). System Editor (P M). To-Do List (P M). To-Do List Archive (P M). Word for Windows (Windows). WordPerfect (DOS). WordPerfect (Windows). WordScan Plus (Windows). View and Help Facility (P M). 3270 Emulation (OS/2 text). 5250 Emulation (OS/2 text).

BASE SCREEN READER/2

When Screen Reader/2 starts, the base Screen Reader/2 profile SRD2 is activated (unless you have specified otherwise). It includes all basic key sequences, and the icon, mouse, scan, and time functions.

The base Screen Reader/2 profile also includes the key sequences that you use for Presentation Manager screens, viewports, autospeaks, and column viewer, the pop-up keypad, and the edit facility.

There is a comprehensive listing of all base Screen Reader/2 key sequences in "Screen Reader/2 Key Sequences".

OS/2 2.1 PRESENTATION MANAGER APPLICATIONS

When you start any of the following Presentation Manager programs, Screen Reader/2 loads a corresponding profile. Under Presentation Manager, Screen Reader/2 automatically reads standard controls such as entry fields, pulldown menus, error messages, and the action bar.

The following Presentation Manager profiles are described in this section:

Activities List. Alarms. BookManager Read/2. Calculator. Calendar. Daily Planner. DeScribe. Enhanced Editor. Lotus 1 2 3. Notepad. Planner Archive. PM Terminal. Spreadsheet. Start Here. System Editor. To-Do List. To-Do List Archive. View and Help Facility.

ACTIVITIES LIST

The Activities List contains all your Daily Planner file entries. You use the Activities List for time-management tasks.

PROFILE NAME: PMDLIST

C THEN 2. Announces heading and activity entry information.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Key sequence C THEN 2 causes the heading information to be read. When you press key sequence C THEN 2, chatty reads the entry headings and expands on some. For example, it says "Alarm minutes before start time" and speaks the three activity types (Out of Office, Personal Holiday, and National Holiday). It also reads the information you entered and tells you entry columns that are blank. Moderate reads the entry headings but without expanding on them. For example, it says only "Alarm" and "Activity type." It also reads the information you entered. Quiet reads only the information you entered.

ALARMS

The Alarms program enables you to set alarms to go off during the day at the time you specify. You can also specify a screen message to be displayed.

PROFILE NAME: PMDALARM

C THEN 2. Reads alarm entry information.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces the static text for the spin-button entries when you are setting alarms.

When you press key sequence C THEN 2, the heading information is read. Chatty reads the entry headings and expands on some. For example, it says "Alarm time is set for" and "Source of information is." Moderate reads the entry headings but without expanding on them. For example, it says only "Alarm time" and "Source." Quiet reads just the information that appears in the selector.

BOOKMANAGER READ/2

The BookManager Read/2 program, version 1.2, displays online books.

PROFILE NAME: BOOKMGR2

C THEN A. Reads current screen. C THEN B. Toggles Page Browse On or Off.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads the page when Page Browse is On. Otherwise, it reads only the current window title. If there is a plus or minus next to an entry in a Table of

Contents, Screen Reader/2 says, "Plus to expand" or "Minus to collapse."

For chatty and moderate, Page Browse is On. For quiet, Page Browse is Off.

CALCULATOR

The Calculator program is like a hand-held calculator, enabling you to perform mathematical operations.

PROFILE NAME: PMDCALC

C THEN 1. Reads error information. C THEN 2. Announces the contents of the calculator memory. C THEN C. Reads the current value.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces changes in the memory area of the calculator. If Character Echo is On (the default), Screen Reader/2 says numbers as you type them. NumLock is turned on when the calculator program starts and whenever the focus is on the calculator. It will also speak any error messages, such as "Divide by 0." Screen Reader/2 announces the results after the EQUAL key is pressed.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.

CALENDAR

The Calendar program is part of the Daily Planner program. It displays a calendar into which you have entered appointments and meetings. You can choose to see details for any day.

PROFILE NAME: PMDCALEN

C THEN 1. Announces the day of the week, the day, the month, and the year.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces the new date when the day, month, or year changes:

   When the month or year changes, chatty announces the

day of the week (for example, Monday), as well as the day, month, and year. Moderate announces the day, month, and year. Quiet announces the day and month.

   When the day changes, chatty announces the day and

month. Moderate and quiet announce only the day,

unless you are on a day which is actually in the previous or next month. In that case, the day and month are announced.

DAILY PLANNER

The Daily Planner program enables you to keep a log of your past or future activities. With the planner, you can set an accompanying alarm for a future activity, mark an activity as completed, and archive the activity for future reference.

PROFILE NAME: PMDDIARY

C THEN 1. Announces the date. C THEN 2. Reads the current Daily Planner entry information. C THEN 3. Reads the activity type and completion status for the current entry. C THEN 5. Reads the column title and contents for the current entry.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces the date and Insert/Replace status. It also reads the new column title and contents when the cursor is under a new column header or when you scroll screen text.

When the date is announced, chatty says the new date, including the Julian date. (The Julian calendar counts days sequentially, not by months. For example, April 13, 1993 would be written 93103 in Julian format: 93 is the year; 103 is the number of days that have passed since the beginning of the year.) Moderate says only the day of the week and date. Quiet says only the month and day; for example, April 13.

When the new column title and contents are spoken or when you have scrolled text on the screen, chatty causes the column-header information to be treated like a help mode, telling you what is expected as input. Moderate reads the column information as it appears on the screen. Quiet reads just the contents of the entry for the current column.

DESCRIBE

The DeScribe word-processor program (version 4.0) enables you to create documents. You can merge text and graphics information, as well as create tables. You can also


(3) DeScribe is a registered trademark of DeScribe, Inc.

import files created with other word-processing programs, such as Microsoft Works.

PROFILE NAME: DESCRIBE

C THEN 1. Reads the font size. C THEN 2. Reads the font name. C THEN 3. Reads style information. C THEN 0. Reads the status line or message line.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

For chatty and moderate, Screen Reader/2 reads the help information automatically. For quiet, the help information is not read automatically.

ENHANCED EDITOR

The Enhanced Editor enables you to create and edit text files. You can also work with multiple files at the same time.

PROFILE NAME: EPM

C THEN 2. Reads the message line. C THEN 3. Reads the status line. C THEN A. Reads the text page.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces Insert/Replace status and the top and bottom of the file.

If you use the frame-control option for prompting, Screen Reader/2 reads the prompt information as you use the Enhanced Editor menu items.

LOTUS 1 2 3 FOR OS/2

The Lotus 1 2 3 application program is a spreadsheet that enables you to analyze data in many ways.

This profile is for Lotus 1 2 3 , Release 2.0.

PROFILE NAME: 123OS2

C THEN 4. Announces the current cell name.


(4) Works is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

(5) Lotus and 1-2-3 are registered trademarks of Lotus Development Corporation.

C THEN 6. Announces the current status (menu, error, help, and so forth). C THEN B. Toggles Cell Browse On or Off. C THEN 5. Reads the contents of the cell. C THEN D. Toggles the cell-name autospeak On or Off. CHORD C H. Reads the contents of the help box.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces the following:

The mode. Help or error boxes. Changes in the status indicators (Scroll Lock, Num Lock, Caps Lock, and Insert/Replace). Ranges while you are copying or moving cells.

Screen Reader/2 also reads the following:

All help topics displayed after you press F1 and the help options as you browse through them using the cursor keys. Each cell as you move to it, if you have set Cell Browse On using key sequence C B.

Chatty talking level automatically turns on Cell Browse (the default is Off). Quiet reads only the help title instead of the entire help page.

NOTEPAD

The Notepad program simulates a paper notepad on your desk. Instead of writing notes on paper, you type them using the Notepad.

PROFILE NAME: PMDNOTE

C THEN 1 THEN N. Announces the title of notepad page n. C THEN A. Reads the current notepad page.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads the title of the new note and announces Insert/Replace status.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.

PLANNER ARCHIVE

The Planner Archive program enables you to store your completed activity data for future reference and retrieval.

PROFILE NAME: PMDDARC

C THEN 2. Reads planner-archive entry information.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Chatty reads the entry headings and expands on some. For example, it says "Alarm minutes before start time" and speaks the three activity types (Out of Office, Personal Holiday, and National Holiday). It also reads the information you entered and tells you entry columns that are blank. Moderate reads the entry headings but without expanding on them. For example, it says only "Alarm" and "Activity type." It also reads the information you entered. Quiet reads only the information you entered.

P M TERMINAL

The P M Terminal program enables your personal computer to communicate with other computer systems by doing the following:

1. Emulating any of the supported terminals.

2. Transferring data (uploading and downloading) between your personal computer and other computer systems.

PROFILE NAME: SOFTERM

C THEN 4. Reads the cursor line minus 4. C THEN 5. Reads the cursor line minus 3. C THEN 6. Reads the cursor line minus 2. C THEN B. Reads the cursor line minus 1. CHORD C *. Switches between views of the status window, the P M Terminal text window, and the Presentation Manager window. CHORD C 4. Toggles P M Terminal text-window-monitor autospeak On or Off.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 automatically reads new information in the PM Terminal text window.

NOTE: This autospeak will only work when the view has been changed to the text-window view by using the chord C *.

Chatty and moderate cause Screen Reader/2 to read all of the information between prompts, or the entire screen if the previous prompt has scrolled off the screen. For quiet, only the current prompt line is read.

SPREADSHEET

The Spreadsheet program enables you to prepare budgets and simple reports, and to analyze data in many ways.

PROFILE NAME: PMSPREAD

C THEN 2. Reads formula field. C THEN B. Toggles Cell Browse On or Off. C THEN 3. Reads cell contents. C THEN D. Toggles cell-name autospeak On or Off.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces Insert/Replace status. It also announces, conditionally, the contents and name of the cell. The conditions are as follows:

1. If you turn on Cell Browse, C B, Screen Reader/2 reads the contents of the cell. 2. If you turn on cell-name, C D, Screen Reader/2 reads the cell name. 3. If you turn on Cell Browse, using C B, and the cell-name autospeak, using C D, Screen Reader/2 reads the cell name and cell contents.

NOTE: You will have to use the key sequences to turn on the cell-browse and the cell-name autospeaks because both are initially set to Off.

For chatty talking level, Cell Browse is automatically turned On.

START HERE

The Start Here program gives basic information about OS/2 in a document format.

PROFILE NAME: STHR

C THEN A. Reads current window. C THEN B. Toggles Page Browse On or Off.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

If Page Browse is On, the profile automatically reads the current page of information as it is displayed. If Page Browse is Off, the current page is not automatically read.

For chatty and moderate, Page Browse is automatically On. For quiet, Page Browse is Off.

SYSTEM EDITOR

The OS/2 System Editor is a text editor. You can use it to create and edit your CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT system files. You can also use it as a convenient tool to display text files or perform basic editing tasks.

PROFILE NAME: SE

C THEN A. Reads only the text portion of the window.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces Insert/Replace status and the top and bottom of the file.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.

TO-DO LIST

The To-Do List program enables you to list tasks that you need or want to do. You can sort the tasks by priority, date, or description.

PROFILE NAME: PMDTODO

C THEN 1. Announces the number of entries for each status type. C THEN 2. Reads to-do list line-entry information. C THEN 3. Announces completion status for the current entry. C THEN 5. Reads the column title and contents for the current entry.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads the new column title and contents when the cursor is either under a new column header or when you scroll text on the screen. It also announces Insert/Replace status.

When the new column title and contents are spoken, chatty causes the column-header information to be treated like the help mode, telling you what is expected as input. Moderate gives the column title and entry information as it appears on the screen. Quiet tells you only the contents of the entry for the current column.

TO-DO LIST ARCHIVE

The To-Do List Archive stores information that you entered using the To-Do List program, and enables you to review and retrieve the information.

PROFILE NAME: PMDTARC

C THEN 2. Announces archived entry information for the to-do list.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Chatty explains the contents of the activity entry most fully. Moderate provides less of an explanation of the contents of the activity entry. Quiet just reads the information as it appears in the selector.

VIEW AND HELP FACILITY

The View and Help Facility program displays online books and help in Presentation Manager applications.

PROFILE NAME: VIEWDOC

C THEN A. Reads the current page. C THEN B. Toggles Page Browse On or Off.

KEYBOARD KEYS:

CTRL + *. Expands all entries in the table of contents. F 7. Moves the focus to the pushbutton area of the display.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads the page when Page Browse is On (the default). Otherwise, it reads only the current window title.

If you are reading a section of the book or help that has more than one page, Screen Reader/2 will read the page and announce "more."

If a plus or minus sign is in front of a topic in the Table of Contents, Screen Reader/2 says, "Plus to expand" or "Minus to collapse."

For chatty and moderate, Page Browse is On. For quiet, Screen Reader/2 automatically turns off Page Browse.

OS/2 2.1 TEXT APPLICATIONS

If you start any of the text-based applications in this list, Screen Reader/2 automatically loads a corresponding profile. These profiles, described in the following sections, are:

Command Prompt. Communications Manager. Hardware Error Pop-up for Full-Screen Sessions. Installation Aid. 3270 Emulation. 5250 Emulation.

COMMAND PROMPT

The Command Prompt profile reads lines on the screen that you specify and also speaks output or messages from commonly used commands. The Command Prompt profile is loaded automatically for an OS/2 full-screen or window session.

NOTE: This profile is sensitive to the Prompt command. If you have altered the default appearance of the command prompt, most of the automatic speaking will not work.

PROFILE NAME: CP

C THEN 4. Reads the cursor line minus 4. C THEN 5. Reads the cursor line minus 3. C THEN 6. Reads the cursor line minus 2. C THEN B. Reads the cursor line minus 1. C THEN C. Reads the cursor line. C THEN H. Reads information between command prompts or the entire screen if the previous command prompt has scrolled off the screen.

NOTE: You can use this key sequence to read help information about a command. For example, if you type DIR /? on the command line and press ENTER, the command syntax with all possible parameters and their descriptions is displayed. Press key sequence C THEN H to hear this information.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces output messages from commonly used commands. For example, the new subdirectory is announced when you use the Change Directory command. It also announces error information.

Chatty reads information between command prompts or the entire screen if the previous command prompt has scrolled off the screen. Moderate announces output messages from commonly used commands and error information. Quiet announces only error information.

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

The full-screen Communications Manager setup program enables you to start and stop your emulator sessions, configure them, upload and download files, and change keyboard key functions.

PROFILE NAME: COMMGR

C THEN 1. Reads the action panel to enable you to remap your keyboard and read previous key information. C THEN C. Reads the line the cursor or selector is on. CHORD C S. Toggles between the full-screen and current box viewport.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads error and help information, titles, entry fields, and selectors.

For chatty and moderate, autospeaks are active. For quiet, only the titles of the help information are spoken.

HARDWARE ERROR POP-UP FOR FULL-SCREEN SESSIONS

This program displays hardware error information, such as a bad disk drive or diskette, or if you neglected to insert a diskette when trying to obtain a directory listing.

NOTE: The profile applies only to full-screen sessions.

PROFILE NAME: HARDERR

C THEN A. Reads error information.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads error and help information, and announces the currently selected action.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.

INSTALLATION AID

The Installation Aid program is an OS/2 full-screen program used for installing programs such as the IBM Assembler or C Compiler.

PROFILE NAME: INSTAIDE

C THEN C. Reads the cursor line or selector.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads error and help information, and the title and page of a help screen. It also announces the screen title and selector, if there is one, on an installation screen.

Chatty and moderate read the entire page of help. Quiet reads only the title of the help page.

3270 EMULATION

The 3270 Emulation profile can be used for several 3270 terminal-emulation programs. These programs are Communication Manager's 3270, TCP/IP's 3270, and the IBM ELEP2.

PROFILE NAME: 3270

C THEN 1. Sets up the error line for XEDIT. C THEN 2. Sets up the command line for XEDIT. C THEN 4. Toggles the autospeak for announcing the error line On or Off. C THEN 0. Announces system status. C THEN C. Reads the line the cursor is on, which is usually the command line. C THEN D. Announces the file name in XEDIT. C THEN #. Announces the position in the file in XEDIT. CHORD C 4. Toggles the autospeak for the VM screen On or Off. CHORD C 0. Announces the status view. CHORD C B. Announces status of Insert/Replace mode. CHORD C S. Reads error information. CHORD C *. Toggles between status view and main view. CHORD D S. Finds the status view.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads the XEDIT command prompt and error line, and announces changed status (such as VM READ, RUNNING), Insert/Replace status and KeyLock status, and new information that appears on a VM screen.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.

5250 EMULATION

The 5250 Emulation profile is used with Communication Manager's 5250 emulation program. This profile is not automatically added to the profile tier. Use key sequence # THEN A to load this profile.

PROFILE NAME: 5250

C THEN C. Announces the cursor line. C THEN #. Reads the status line.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces a changed session, system availability, message waiting, keyboard shift, Insert/Replace status, keystroke buffering, and inhibited input. When input is inhibited, your cursor is on a part of the VM screen where you cannot enter information.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.

OS/2 2.1 DOS SESSION APPLICATIONS

When you start any of the following DOS-session applications in a window, Screen Reader/2 automatically loads a corresponding profile if the window title is exactly the same as the title selected when the applications were migrated.

The next sections describe these OS/2 2.1 DOS session profiles:

BookManager Read/DOS. Command Prompt. Hardware Error Pop-up for Full-Screen Sessions (DOS). Lotus 1 2 3. Quicken. WordPerfect.

NOTE: The DOS programs are initially migrated as full-screen sessions. In order to fully utilize the Screen Reader/2 functions, we suggest that you change them to DOS window sessions by doing the following:

1. Bring up the pop-up menu for the program object that you want to change.

2. Press RIGHT ARROW to open the settings notebook. Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook.

3. On the second page, cursor down to the DOS Window auto-radio button.

4. Close the settings notebook. The program will now be in a DOS window session.

BOOKMANAGER READ/DOS

The BookManager Read/DOS program, version 1.2, displays online books.

PROFILE NAME: BOOKMGR

C THEN A. Reads the currently active screen. C THEN B. Toggles Page Browse On or Off. C THEN C. Reads the cursor line or selector. C THEN #. Announces the cursor or selector location. C THEN 0. Announces status information. C THEN D. Announces context information about the screen you are in currently (for example, text window, action bar, pull-down menu, or help). C THEN H. Announces function-key help. C THEN 6. Announces general help. C THEN 7. Cycles through selector response types: Says selector. Says rest of line. Says selector and rest of line. Says entire line. C THEN 1. Finds the hit word from the top. C THEN 2. Finds the next occurrence of the hit word.

NOTE: The hit word is the word for which you are searching. If you are using key sequences C THEN 1 and C THEN 2 to search for a hit word, you need to press C THEN 1, then C THEN 2 each time you change the page. Otherwise, Screen Reader/2 announces there is no occurrence of the hit word on the new page.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

The default is Screen Reader/2 reads new selectors and new pages when you move around in a document.

By using C THEN 7, you can change what Screen Reader/2 reads when the selector changes.

If Page Browse is set to Off or if the talking level is set to quiet, new pages are not read automatically.

COMMAND PROMPT

The Command Prompt profile reads lines on the screen that you specify and also speaks output or messages from commonly used commands.

PROFILE NAME: CP

C THEN 4. Reads the cursor line minus 4. C THEN 5. Reads the cursor line minus 3. C THEN 6. Reads the cursor line minus 2. C THEN B. Reads the cursor line minus 1. C THEN C. Reads the cursor line. C THEN H. Reads information between command prompts or the entire screen if the previous command prompt has scrolled off the screen. You can use this key sequence to read help information about a command. For example, if you type DIR /? on the command line and press ENTER, you hear the command syntax with all possible parameters and their descriptions.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces output messages from commonly used commands. For example, the new subdirectory is announced when you use the Change Directory command. It also announces error information.

Chatty reads information between command prompts or the entire screen if the previous command prompt has scrolled off the screen. Moderate announces output messages from commonly used commands and error information. Quiet announces only error information.

HARDWARE ERROR POP-UP FOR FULL-SCREEN SESSIONS

This program displays hardware error information, such as a bad disk drive or diskette, or if you neglected to insert a diskette when trying to obtain a directory listing.

NOTE: The profile applies only to DOS full-screen sessions.

PROFILE NAME: HARDERR

C THEN A. Reads error information.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads error and help information, and announces the currently selected action.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.

LOTUS 1 2 3

The Lotus 1 2 3 application program is a spreadsheet that enables you to analyze data in many ways.

The Screen Reader/2 profile for Lotus 1 2 3, version 2.4, is built so that you can take advantage of Lotus 1 2 3 features. It includes a special autospeak called Cell Browse so you can hear the contents of a cell when you highlight it.

When you install the Lotus 1 2 3 program, specify CGA as the video type and do not install WYSIWYG. This prevents the graphics mode from being installed; therefore, Screen Reader/2 can read the information that is displayed.

NOTE: This profile works only in a DOS window session. If you migrate this application to the Desktop, ensure that the session selection in the application's settings notebook is DOS window and not DOS full screen. Also, ensure that you don't change the title from Lotus 123 R2.4.

PROFILE NAME: 1 2 3

C THEN 1. Reads line 1. C THEN 2. Reads line 2. C THEN 3. Reads line 3. C THEN A. Reads the error box. C THEN 4. Announces the current cell name. C THEN 5. Announces the message in pointer mode. C THEN 6. Announces the current status (menu, error, help, and so forth). C THEN B. Toggles Cell Browse On or Off. C THEN C. Reads the contents of the cell. C THEN D. Toggles the cell-name autospeak On or Off. CHORD C 5. Reads the highlighted menu option. CHORD C 6. Reads the rest of the line that contains the highlighted help option in the help box. CHORD C H. Reads the contents of the help box.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 announces the following:

Entrance into Lotus 1 2 3. The mode (and then sets appropriate viewports). The contents of the menu or file-list selector. Help or error boxes. Changes in the status indicators (Scroll Lock, Num Lock, Caps Lock, and Insert/Replace status). Ranges while copying or moving cells.

Screen Reader/2 also reads the following:

All help topics displayed after you press F1 and the help options as you browse through them using the cursor keys.

Each cell as you move to it, if you have set Cell Browse On using key sequence C THEN B.

Highlighted menu items as you browse through them.

Chatty automatically turns on Cell Browse (the default is Off). Quiet reads only the help title instead of the entire help page.

QUICKEN

Quicken is a personal financial program that helps you balance your checkbook, pay bills, and track investments.

NOTE: This profile works only for Quicken version 6.0. However, it does not work in a DOS full-screen session. If you migrate this application to the Desktop, ensure that the session selection in the application's settings notebook is DOS window and not DOS full screen. Also, ensure that you don't change the title from Quicken.

The only color combination that you should select when using Quicken is the default of navy on azure.

PROFILE NAME: Q

C THEN 1. Reads the help line associated with the highlighted menu option. C THEN 2. Reads the contents of a box (for example, the help box). C THEN C. Reads the menu item, entry field, or line the cursor is on.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads the highlighted menu option; the current checkbook field; information, help, and tutorial boxes; the highlighted item in a pull-down menu; and the transaction settings. It also announces entry fields as they appear.

Talking levels do not affect this profile.


(6) Quicken is a registered trademarks of Intuit Inc.

WORDPERFECT

WordPerfect is a word-processing program used to create documents. This profile is for WordPerfect version 5.1.

NOTE: Ensure that you don't change the profile title from WordPerfect.

This profile works for the two sets of default colors in WordPerfect 5.1. If colors have changed, go back to the default colors. The two sets of default colors are:

DEFAULT COLORS SET 1

1. Normal Text (dark grey on dark blue). 2. Bold (white on dark blue). 3. Underlined (dark blue on dark grey). 4. Bold and Underlined (white on dark grey). 5. Block On (dark grey on dark red).

DEFAULT COLORS SET 2

1. Normal Text (dark grey on dark blue). 2. Bold (dark cyan on dark blue). 3. Underlined (white on dark blue). 4. Underlined (dark blue on dark grey). 5. Bold and Underlined (black on dark grey). 6. Block On (dark grey on dark red).

PROFILE NAME: WP

C THEN 1 THEN 1. Begins a search for a highlighted block from the top. C THEN 1 THEN 2. Begins a search for a bold word from the top. C THEN 1 THEN 3. Begins a search for an underlined word from the top. C THEN 1 THEN A. Begins a search for a bold, underlined word from the top. C THEN 2. Continues C1 search from current pointer position. C THEN 3. Continues C1 search from the top. C THEN 4. Toggles reveal-code autospeak On or Off. C THEN 5. Reads the sentence with the misspelled word. C THEN 6. Reads general help. C THEN 0. Reads the status line. C THEN B. Moves to the top of the menu, spelling items, or thesaurus items. C THEN C. Reads the cursor line or selector. C THEN D. Announces the mode (spell, edit, menu, etc.)


(7) WordPerfect is a registered trademark of WordPerfect Corporation.

C THEN H. Reads specific help. C THEN #. Announces the cursor position in editing mode. CHORD * 4. Reads the previous menu, spelling, or thesaurus item. CHORD * 5. Reads the current menu, spelling, or thesaurus item. CHORD * 6. Reads the next menu, spelling, or thesaurus item.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 does the following:

It monitors the top, bottom, and cursor lines, and triggers other autospeaks when these change.

It announces a directory name and the name of the file at the current selector.

It announces selector changes and reads the currently highlighted item.

It announces the following codes for text characteristics:

Normal text. Bold. Underlined. Bold and underlined. Block on.

It detects the thesaurus screen and reads the word you specified.

It detects the spell-checker screen and reads the misspelled word.

It reads the help screen.

It announces the Keys Help Index if it appears.

It reads the menus at the bottom of the screen and the current entry in a menu, and announces if a field containing the default or current settings for the entry exists.

It announces the document number.

It reads the highlighted pull-down menu item.

Chatty reads the entire help window, the menu list, and the menu. Moderate reads the entire help window and the menu. Quiet reads only the help title.

WINDOWS APPLICATIONS

When you start any of the following Windows programs, Screen Reader/2 loads a corresponding profile. Under Windows, Screen Reader/2 automatically reads standard controls such as entry fields, pulldown menus, error messages, and the action bar.

You must have a mouse installed on your system for the mouse actions to work in Windows programs.

Descriptions of the following profiles are discussed in this section:

AmiPro. Calculator for Windows. Help for Windows. Quicken 2 for Windows. Word for Windows. WordPerfect for Windows. WordScan Plus for Windows.

AMIPRO

AmiPro is a word-processing tool. This profile is for AmiPro, version 3.01. You must have a mouse installed on your system for AmiPro to work properly with Screen Reader/2.

PROFILE NAME: AMIPRO

C THEN 1. Announces the paragraph style. C THEN 2. Announces the font face name. C THEN 3. Announces the font point size. C THEN 4. Reads the highlighted portion in grammar checking. C THEN 5. Reads the line with the misspelled word. C THEN 6. Reads the suggestion in the grammar checker. C THEN H. Reads the general help. C THEN 0. Reads the status line. C THEN A. Reads a text page.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 spells the misspelled word when you use AmiPro's spell checking tool.

In the chatty talking level, the explanation for the currently highlighted menu item is read.


(8) AmiPro is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporation.

CALCULATOR

The Windows Calculator program can be used to perform simple operations or to solve scientific mathematical problems.

PROFILE NAME: CALC

C THEN 1. Announces the calculator type (scientific or standard calculator). C THEN 2. Reads the result. C THEN 3. Announces the calculator mode (hex, decimal, octal, binary, and so on).

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 echoes the key presses as they apply to the functions in the calculator.

Talking levels have no effect on this profile.

HELP FOR WINDOWS

The Help for Windows program is used to display help information for programs running under Windows.

PROFILE NAME: WINHELP

C THEN H. Reads general help.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

For chatty and moderate, Screen Reader/2 reads the help information. For quiet, the help information is not read automatically.

QUICKEN 2 FOR WINDOWS

Quicken 2 is a personal financial program that helps you balance your checkbook, pay bills, and track investments. This profile was written for Quicken for Windows, version 2.0.

PROFILE NAME: QW

C THEN A. Reads the current list item with the column titles. C THEN B. Reads the column title and entry. C THEN D. Reads information based on the column function.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

In chatty or moderate modes, the column titles are read as you enter information into checks or the registers with one-line settings. When you use reports, the

category name is read for the selected item. Also, when you change columns, the column title is read; when you change categories, the category name is read.

When you set up a budget, the category name is read along with the entry information. Also, when you change columns, the column title is read; when you change categories, the category name is read.

Quiet reads only the entry information without the column titles.

NOTE: When you use reports, if you have turned off the Use Color option, autospeaks are not heard.

WORD FOR WINDOWS

The Word for Windows program is a word-processing tool which can help you to create professional-looking documents. You can use Word in conjunction with the WordScan Plus program to scan in paper documents to edit on your computer with the Word program.

This profile is for Microsoft Word, version 2.0.

PROFILE NAME: MSWORD

C THEN 1. Announces the font style. C THEN 2. Announces the font name. C THEN 3. Announces the font point size. C THEN 4. Reads the highlighted portion in grammar checking. C THEN 5. Reads the line with the misspelled word. C THEN H. Reads general help. C THEN 0. Reads the status line. C THEN #. Announces the cursor position. C THEN A. Reads the text page.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 spells the misspelled word when using the spelling-checker tool.

With chatty, the explanation for the current highlighted menu item is read.

WORDPERFECT FOR WINDOWS

WordPerfect is a word-processing program used to create documents. This profile is for WordPerfect for Windows, version 5.2.

PROFILE NAME: WPWINFIL

C THEN 4. Toggles speaking reveal codes On or Off.

C THEN 5. Reads the line with the misspelled word. C THEN H. Reads general help. C THEN 0. Reads the status line. C THEN #. Announces the cursor position in editing mode.

WHAT YOU HEAR:

Screen Reader/2 reads the misspelled word when you are using the spelling-checker tool. It also reads messages generated by the spelling-checker and thesaurus. Screen Reader/2 reads the reveal code at the cursor position when the code changes, if it is on. The default is Off.

Chatty reads the description of the currently highlighted task. Moderate and quiet are not active in this profile.

LIMITATIONS: Screen Reader/2 cannot detect when a word is underlined, double underlined, or red-lined. This is due to the underlines being drawn rather than being part of the font of the character.

WORDSCAN PLUS FOR WINDOWS

The WordScan Plus program, version 1.1, is an optical-character-recognition program that works with a page scanner or FAX file to convert printed documents into text that you can edit on your computer. The Setup window has settings that can only be changed by using a mouse. Screen Reader/2 can perform mouse functions through key sequences. However, you must have a mouse installed on your system for the WordScan Plus key sequences to work.

PROFILE NAME: WORDSCAN

C THEN 1. Sets the program for what you want to capture from the document. C THEN 2. Sets the page orientation of the document. C THEN 3. Sets the type quality. C THEN A. Sets the source of the document image. C THEN 4. Automatically sets the brightness level to lighten or darken the source document. (This feature is available only if your scanner has an automatic brightness setting.) C THEN 5. Reads the status of WordScan Plus settings. (This key sequence will work without a mouse installed.) C THEN 7. Starts processing automatically. C THEN 8. Starts the processing preview.

WHAT YOU HEAR


(9) WordScan is a trademark of Calera Recognition Systems, Inc.

Screen Reader/2 reads the progress-monitor information so that you know how much of the document has been processed.

When using chatty, the Setup category is spoken when a setting is changed using the key sequences C THEN 1 through C THEN 8 and C THEN A described above.

SAVING YOUR SCREEN READER/2 SETTINGS

As you use a profile, you might find that it does not work exactly as you would like. For example, you might want to change the browse and echo settings in the edit facility profile. Using the information provided in the profile discussions earlier in this chapter, you can change various attributes to suit your needs.

If you want the revised profile to start automatically when you start Screen Reader/2, use key sequence B THEN * to save your changes. The next time you start Screen Reader/2, your customized profiles will be ready to use.

NOTE: If you have added a new profile to the tier and then saved your changes, that new profile must be present the next time you start Screen Reader/2. If the profile tier is not exactly as it was when you saved your changes, the changes you saved will not be active. When the profile tier is restored to the way it was when you saved changes, they will be active.

Settings are saved in a file with a name based on the current program name and the extension .STO; for example, BOOKMGR.STO. These settings are saved in this file in the Screen Reader/2 directory to be recalled the next time you use that program.

Key sequence B THEN * is also used to save the following Screen Reader/2 settings:

BLANK Bottom. CAPS. Dictionary. FORCESPELL. Format. GRAPHICS. Icons. IGNORE. Left. LOCKSTATUS. Mode. NOISE Numbering. PAUSE. Pitch. POINTER. Rate. RIGHT. Spaces. SPELLCAPS. Stopping TABLE. Top. TRAILING. Trap VIEW. Viewport. VOLUME. Word definitions. WRAP.

Refer to the Set command in the PAL Reference online book for a description of each of these settings.

NOTE: Refer to the section "Screen Reader/2 Notebooks" for information about saving settings in your Screen Reader/2 Settings, Synthesizer Settings, and Message Settings notebooks.

STARTING SCREEN READER/2

The Screen Reader/2 installation program sets up Screen Reader/2 to start automatically when you turn on your system.

However, you may want to restart Screen Reader/2 to change the default profile tier or to activate changes you have made to the default tier. You can restart it by following these steps:

1. Open the Independence Series folder on your OS/2 Desktop. 2. Open the Screen Reader/2 program object in the Independence Series folder. 3. If Screen Reader/2 is running, you will be asked if you are sure you want to stop Screen Reader/2 and restart it. Press ENTER to restart the system.

You should hear a message telling you that Screen Reader/2 started (up to 30 seconds after you perform these two steps). If you hear three short beeps instead, your synthesizer may be turned off. Turn on your synthesizer and press ENTER. Screen Reader/2 should now start.

If you hear three beeps when you would expect your synthesizer to start talking (for example, when you start your computer), verify that the synthesizer is turned on and that the cables are all connected. Then press ENTER. If you resolved the problem, speech should begin shortly. If not, you will hear three beeps again. If you press ENTER, Screen Reader/2 will be stopped.

NOTE: For information about problems related to starting Screen Reader/2, refer to the "Problem Determination" section of the Getting Started manual (either in print or on cassette).

CHANGING THE WAY SCREEN READER/2 STARTS

When you install Screen Reader/2, the installation program creates a batch file called SRD2.CMD. This file starts Screen Reader/2 and loads the base profile automatically. The base profile contains the basic Screen Reader/2 key sequences and cannot be removed from the profile tier. However, you can specify additional profiles to be loaded at startup time by modifying the SRD2.CMD batch file.

The SRD2.CMD batch file contains the following line:

START SRD SRD2

The command START SRD starts the program; SRD2 is the base profile that is loaded for all sessions. To add other profiles to the batch file, type the profile name after the SRD2 profile name. The additional profiles will be loaded each time you start Screen Reader/2, and they will be on all tiers like Screen Reader/2. However, unlike the base profile, these additional profiles can be removed from the profile tier. Refer to the section "Adding and Removing Profiles" for more information.

SPECIFYING SYNTHESIZER SETTINGS

You can also specify synthesizer settings in the startup command file. Screen Reader/2 uses the synthesizer settings specified in SRD.TTS, unless you specify otherwise. (The extension .TTS stands for Text To Speech.) To use a different synthesizer settings (.TTS) file or more than one synthesizer, insert the following command in the SRD2.CMD batch file.

SRD [/s xxx.TTS] [profile name]

NOTE: xxx is a synthesizer settings file name. profile name is optional.

You can enter the command more than once in the SRD.CMD file. For example:

/s acc.tts /s pss.tts srd2 myprof

In this example, Screen Reader/2 can send output to either synthesizer specified in the synthesizer settings file. Unless you use a customized profile that uses the DEVICE command, Screen Reader/2 will send output to only the synthesizer indicated by the first parameter.

NOTE: Use /s only if you want to use a different file, or files, than the default file (SRD.TTS) that was created when you installed Screen Reader/2.

ADDING PROFILES WITH THE SETTINGS NOTEBOOK

If you want to add a profile to the base (for example, a profile you created that contains customized key sequences), you can either edit the SRD2.CMD file and add the profile name to the end of the command, or change the file using the Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook.

To change the file using the Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook, follow these steps:

1. Open the Independence Series folder. It is on your OS/2 Desktop.

2. Select the Screen Reader/2 program object in the Independence Series folder, but do not press ENTER.

3. Press SHIFT+F10 to display the Screen Reader/2 pop-up menu. The first item on the pop-up menu is Open. It has an arrow to its right, indicating that there is a submenu.

4. Press the RIGHT ARROW key to display the submenu.

5. Select the first item, Settings, to display the Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook. The cursor is at the first character of an entry field containing the Screen Reader/2 parameters currently in SRD2.CMD.

6. Type any additional parameters.

7. Press ALT+F4 to save your changes and close the notebook.

SCREEN READER/2 NOTEBOOKS

Each object on the Desktop has a notebook attached to it. Notebooks are so called because they actually look like notebooks, with tabs separating the sections. Each tab relates to a topic contained in the notebook and each topic contains one or more pages. You can change values and settings on the pages.

The Screen Reader/2 object has three notebooks:

The Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook is used to change the starting parameters for Screen Reader/2.

The Synthesizer Settings notebook is used to change the values for your synthesizer.

The Message Settings notebook is used to change the way Screen Reader/2 speaks.

NOTE: If you are satisfied with the way your synthesizer is working, you should not change any of the settings in the Synthesizer Settings notebook.

DISPLAYING THE SCREEN READER/2 NOTEBOOKS

To display the Screen Reader/2 notebooks:

1. Open the Independence Series folder. It is on your Desktop.

2. Select the Screen Reader/2 object in the Independence Series folder. Do not press ENTER.

3. Press SHIFT+F10 to display the Screen Reader/2 pop-up menu.

The first item is Open. It has an arrow to its right, indicating that there is a submenu.

4. Press the RIGHT ARROW key to display the submenu.

The items on the submenu are:

Settings. Start/Restart. Synthesizer Settings. Message Settings. About.

NOTE: The Start/Restart and ABOUT items are not notebooks.

START/RESTART enables you to start or restart Screen Reader/2.

ABOUT describes the Screen Reader/2 license and copyright.

5. Select the notebook with which you want to work:

Use the Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook to view and modify the parameters that are used to start Screen Reader/2 and to change the current icon and title.

Use the Synthesizer Settings notebook to change the settings for your synthesizer.

Use the Message Settings notebook to display and change the dictionary and to change the way Screen Reader/2 pronounces and spells words.

For more information about a notebook and how to change its values, press F1 while the notebook is open.

USING SCREEN READER/2 NOTEBOOKS

To scroll through the notebook pages from one section to another, use one of the following methods:

1. Use the ALT+UP ARROW keys to move the cursor to the notebook tabs. Then use the UP ARROW or DOWN ARROW key to move the cursor to the tab you want and press ENTER. Use the ALT+DOWN ARROW keys to return to the notebook page.

2. Use the ALT+PAGE DOWN and ALT+PAGE UP keys to move through the notebook pages.

To move the cursor between the different window controls on a notebook page, use the TAB key. To move the cursor within a control group, use the directional arrow keys. The controls are:

CHECK BOXES. A check box is a two-part control consisting of a square box and text describing a choice you can make. A check box acts as a switch. You press the SPACEBAR to select a check box, which is then filled in with an X or check mark. Check boxes are used for settings such as acknowledge stop, always stop, and the Screen Reader/2 Stop key.

COMBINATION BOXES (COMBO BOX). A combination box is a control that combines the functions of a spin button and a list box. It contains a list of objects that you can scroll through and select from to complete the entry field.

ENTRY FIELD. An entry field is a two-part control consisting of text and a rectangular box. You can type either one or more lines in this box, depending on whether it is a single-line entry field or a multiple-line entry field. When an entry field is first displayed, it is either blank or contains a default value. To change the value, type a new value and press ENTER, or TAB to the next control. Screen Reader/2 uses entry fields for stop delay, search strings, notes, dictionary words and replacements, remarks, key delay, and code page.

LIST BOXES. A list box is a rectangular box with scroll bars that usually contains a scrollable list of choices from which you can select one choice. Screen Reader/2 uses list boxes for such functions as saving your changes to a file.

MENU BAR. The action bar is the area at the top of the primary window. It contains actions that are available in this window. The action bar is on line 2 of the Screen Reader/2 notebooks. The Synthesizer Settings notebook has only one choice: File. The Message Settings notebook has two choices: File and Utility. When you choose either, a pull-down menu is displayed.

PUSHBUTTONS. A pushbutton is rectangular with rounded corners. It contains text that shows the actions in dialog boxes, secondary windows, and message boxes. When you select a pushbutton, the action indicated by the text occurs immediately. Pushbuttons are near the bottom of each notebook page and each dialog window. The functions performed by pushbuttons include Undo, Search, Help, and Cancel. Use the TAB key and the directional arrow keys to move the cursor to a pushbutton, then press ENTER to perform the function.

RADIO BUTTONS. Radio buttons are round buttons on the screen with text beside them. You can select only one in a group of radio buttons. Auto-radio buttons are automatically selected when you move to them. You use radio buttons when setting up your Desktop and when setting such Screen Reader/2 options as Indexing.

SCROLLABLE LISTS. A scrollable list is a vertical listing of values. Use the UP ARROW and DOWN ARROW keys to move through a scrollable list. If the window containing the values is not wide enough to display all of the information in one column, you can also use RIGHT ARROW and LEFT ARROW to hear the rest of the information. The HOME

key moves the cursor to the top of the list and the END key moves the cursor to the bottom of the list.

To change a value (such as a spelling-table entry or a synthesizer code) in a scrollable list, press ENTER while the cursor is on the correct value to display an edit box containing the text value. After changing the text, press ENTER to confirm the change. To return to the scrollable list without changing the value, press ESCAPE. Screen Reader/2 uses scrollable lists for synthesizer codes and values, ASCII set conversion table, announcements, spelling tables, and the dictionary.

SPIN BUTTONS. Spin buttons are controls that enable you to choose an entry from a list of choices. Only one choice is displayed at a time. Use the UP ARROW and DOWN ARROW keys to cycle through these choices. Spin buttons are used for all the COM port parameters, the synthesizer codes, the ASCII character set, and buffer management parameters.

SCREEN READER/2 SETTINGS NOTEBOOK

The Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook enables you to change Screen Reader/2 characteristics and edit the SRD2.CMD file to change the way Screen Reader/2 starts.

Select Settings on the Screen Reader/2 Open submenu to display the Screen Reader/2 Settings notebook which has the following tabs:

PARAMETERS. This page enables you to view and modify the parameters that are used to start Screen Reader/2. These parameters are used by the the SRD2.CMD file.

At the bottom of the notebook page are three pushbuttons:

UNDO. Choose this pushbutton to reset any changes to the values that were read when you opened the Settings notebook.

DEFAULT. Choose this button to change the parameter to the default: SRD2.

HELP. Choose this button to display general help for the entire page.

GENERAL. This page enables you to change the name of the Screen Reader/2 object, or icon, that represents the program. You change the name by typing a new name in the Title

field. You can change the icon that represents this object by using the CREATE ANOTHER, EDIT, or FIND pushbuttons.

Press F1 for more information about how to make a selection or for technical information about your current choices. F1 displays a contextual help window. If you need information about the help window, press F1 while you use the help facility.

After making your changes, press ALT+F4. Your changes will be saved automatically and the notebook is closed.

SYNTHESIZER SETTINGS NOTEBOOK

Select Synthesizer Settings on the Screen Reader/2 Open submenu and press ENTER. The first page of the Synthesizer Settings notebook is displayed for you to make your changes.

Synthesizer settings are contained in .TTS files. The Synthesizer Settings notebook has the following tabs:

SYNTHESIZER CODES. This page enables you to change the following synthesizer codes:

CONTROL. Control codes direct speech output to the synthesizer. The codes include starting and stopping speech, initializing the synthesizer, and sending and receiving index markers.

PITCH. Pitch is the tone, or frequency, of the synthesizer's voice. It can range from low to high.

RATE. Rate is the speed of speech.

VOLUME. Volume is the loudness of speech.

SPECIAL. Special codes are synthesizer-specific and can be set up for such features as changing voices and languages. After setting the code, you can use a keypad key sequence to send it. To activate a special code, press key sequence A THEN A THEN N; n represents the number (1 to 9) assigned to the special code.

COM PORT. On this page, you can change six synthesizer communications parameters:

COMMUNICATIONS (SERIAL) PORT. The serial connector to which your synthesizer is connected.

BAUD RATE. The speed (bits per second) at which your computer and synthesizer send data to each other.

WORD LENGTH. The size of the data packet that your synthesizer and computer use to communicate.

PARITY. The method that the synthesizer and computer use to detect transmission errors.

NUMBER OF STOP BITS. Signals that are sent to the computer or the synthesizer to indicate the end of the data packet.

HANDSHAKING. Another word for protocol (such as XON/XOFF).

OTHER. On this page, the settings are:

INDEXING. The capability of some synthesizers to send markers back through the asynchronous communications channel after each word is spoken. This capability enables the Screen Reader/2 pointer to move to the beginning of each word as it is spoken. This setting is checked if your synthesizer supports this feature.

TYPE. The Serial setting is checked, indicating that your synthesizer is connected externally to a serial port. You should change the setting to Internal only if you have been told by your synthesizer manufacturer to do so.

COMMENTS. Usually contains the name of the synthesizer(s) associated with this file.

(This is a freeform field so you can type in any data you want.)

STOP. On this page, the settings are:

DELAY. The time Screen Reader/2 waits to send more text after it sends a Stop command.

ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. This setting is checked if your synthesizer returns a code after having processed the Stop command.

ALWAYS STOP. This setting is checked if your synthesizer can handle a Stop command independent of the state of the protocol.

ASCII SET. This option enables you to specify your synthesizer's ASCII character-set support. You can select LOWER (128 characters), FULL (256 characters), or CONVERT (256 characters with conversion). LOWER means the synthesizer can speak characters only in the lower half of the character set. FULL means the synthesizer can speak the entire character set. CONVERT is a Screen Reader/2 process that allows some synthesizers to speak the full table.

If you are using an InfoVox VoxBox synthesizer or Braille device, you will probably select Convert. With this choice, you also specify the code page your system uses, and you type the string to send to the synthesizer for each ASCII character.

BUFFER MANAGEMENT. On this page, you specify whether or not to activate Screen Reader/2's buffer management or Smart Talk features.

Check the BUFFER MANAGEMENT check box if your synthesizer will not accept any commands while its buffer is full (indicated by a slow response to a Stop command).

If you have buffer management set to On, you select the number of characters to wait before Screen Reader/2 searches for a good breaking point to start and stop speech output. You also specify the string to send when Screen Reader/2 detects that the synthesizer buffer is full and the string that the synthesizer returns when its buffer is empty.

Check the SMART TALK check box if your synthesizer waits until it receives all data from a request before beginning to speak. Smart Talk causes Screen Reader/2 to send a Talk command to the synthesizer before Screen Reader/2 reads all the text. Most synthesizers work well with Smart Talk active, although there may be extra pauses.

SAVING YOUR CHANGES

You can save changes you made to the synthesizer settings in either of two ways:

1. You can save the changes in the same synthesizer file. To do this, press ALT+F4.

2. You can save the changes in a different synthesizer file by doing the following:

a. Select the File choice on the action bar and press ENTER. b. Select Save to file from the pull-down menu to display a Save as file-dialog window. In this window, you can type a full drive, directory, and file name, or just a file name, and then select a drive and directory from the scrollable lists. c. To confirm that you want to save the file, press ENTER or choose the SAVE pushbutton.

CHANGING SETTINGS IN OTHER FILES

To change synthesizer settings in files other than the one you are using, do the following:

1. Open the Configuration - Screen Reader/2 object in your Independence Series folder.

All Screen Reader/2-supported synthesizer files are displayed as data objects in this folder. These objects are identified by their file names. The

default synthesizer file that Screen Reader/2 uses is SRD.TTS. Screen Reader/2 may also be using additional (or different) .TTS files if you changed the way Screen Reader/2 starts.

2. Select the synthesizer settings file you want, then press ENTER.

3. When the Synthesizer Settings notebook is displayed, make your changes, then press F10 to display the File pull-down menu.

4. Select Save to file to save the changes you just made.

NOTE: If you have added or removed a .TTS file and the change is not reflected in the Configuration - Screen Reader/2 folder, you should select the Refresh Contents object. When this object is selected, it closes the Configuration - Screen Reader/2 folder and takes you back to the Independence Series folder. When you open the Configuration - Screen Reader/2 folder again, the .TTS file list will be updated.

MESSAGE SETTINGS NOTEBOOK

You use the Message Settings notebook to work with spelling tables, Screen Reader/2 messages, and the dictionary.

Select Message Settings on the Screen Reader/2 Open submenu to display the Message Settings notebook.

The Message Settings notebook has the following tabs:

SPELLING TABLES. On this page, you can change the ASCII strings Screen Reader/2 sends to the synthesizer for each entry in Screen Reader/2's five spelling tables. Each spelling table has 256 entries. The spelling tables and their functions are:

DEFAULT. Tells Screen Reader/2 what to send to the synthesizer for characters on the display when Screen Reader/2 spells characters or words.

PHONETIC. Same as the default table, but all letters have phonetic names.

COLOR. Tells Screen Reader/2 what to send to the synthesizer for 64 color attributes.

STANDARD KEYS. Contains the description of the standard keyboard key for each ASCII code.

EXTENDED KEYS. Contains the description of extended keys such as function keys and cursor movement keys.

NOTE: The Standard Keys and Extended Keys tables are used for the key-echo function.

OTHER. On this page, the settings are:

KEY DELAY. The amount of time Screen Reader/2 waits for a second key press before canceling a key sequence.

KEYPAD. If this setting is checked, you will hear a warning message if a keypad is not attached.

STOP. If checked, Screen Reader/2 sends the Stop command each time a key is pressed on the keypad.

CODE PAGE. Enables you to specify the code page that should be used with this file. Unless you are creating a file for another set of characters, this number should be identical to that of the code page you are currently using.

COMMENTS. Contains information about the current code page.

ANNOUNCEMENTS. On this page, you can change what your synthesizer says for the following types of announcements: Screen Reader/2 formats and modes. Keypad and help messages. Viewport messages. Error messages and information messages.

DICTIONARY. On this page, you can tell Screen Reader/2 how the synthesizer should pronounce certain words which it might otherwise mispronounce, if following the normal rules of pronunciation. You tell Screen Reader/2 how to pronounce words by spelling them like they sound.

For example, OS (for Operating System) is included in your dictionary list of words. Because your synthesizer might read it as "OZ," the replacement letters "O S" provide the correct pronunciation to be used.

USING THE DICTIONARY AND SPELLING TABLES

If you select the Utility choice on the action bar in the Message Settings notebook and press ENTER, a pull-down menu with the following choices appears:

Import dictionary file. Export dictionary file. Import spelling table. Export spelling table.

Use this pull-down menu to import or export dictionary or spelling-table ASCII files. When you choose any of these menu items, a dialog window appears that has a filename entry field. Type the name of the file containing your ASCII spelling table or dictionary. If you are exporting a spelling-table ASCII file, you must select the spelling-table name from a scrollable list. To perform the import or export action, press ENTER.

SAVING YOUR CHANGES

You can change the message settings that you are currently using. The changes take effect immediately and remain in effect only until you turn off Screen Reader/2. However, you can choose to save these settings for future use, and you can also change them in other files for future use.

You can save changes you made to the message settings in either of two ways:

1. You can save the changes in the same message-settings file. To do this, press ALT+F4.

2. You can save the changes in a different message-settings file. To do this:

a. Select the File choice on the action bar and press ENTER.

b. Select Save to file from the pull-down menu to display a Save as file-dialog window. In this window, you can type a full drive, directory, and file name, or just a file name, and then select a drive and directory from the scrollable lists.

c. To confirm that you want to save the file, press ENTER or choose the SAVE pushbutton.

CHANGING SETTINGS IN OTHER FILES

To change Screen Reader/2 messages in files other than the one you are using:

1. Open the Configuration - Screen Reader/2 object in your Independence Series folder.

All Screen Reader/2-supported message files are displayed as data objects in this folder. These objects are identified by their file names. Message files have the extension .CNF. The default message file that Screen Reader/2 uses is SRD.CNF.

2. To open a notebook to change the Screen Reader/2 messages and dictionary file, select the SRD.CNF file and press ENTER. The first page of the Screen Reader/2 Message Settings notebook is displayed.

3. Make the changes you want, then press F10 to move the cursor to the File option on the action bar of the Message Settings notebook.

4. Press ENTER to display the pull-down menu.

5. Press ENTER to select the Save to file option.

6. The Save CNF File window is displayed. In this window, you can type a full drive, directory, and file name, or just a file name, and then select a drive and directory from the scrollable lists.

7. To confirm that you want to save the file, press ENTER or choose the SAVE pushbutton.

SYNTHESIZERS

This section contains technical data about the Screen Reader/2-supported synthesizers. Included are the default Screen Reader/2 settings for each synthesizer and the required switch settings, if any.

NOTE: To use a synthesizer not listed in this User's Guide, contact either your synthesizer manufacturer or the place where you purchased Screen Reader/2 to determine support and setup procedures.

ACCENT BY AICOM

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Accent synthesizer are in the ACC.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 7 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. Active for voices 1 to 9. STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. Clear to Send. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower.

HARDWARE SETTINGS

Switches 4 and 8 are On; all others are Off.

NOTE: If you turn off the Accent synthesizer during a session, you should restart Screen Reader/2 after you turn the Accent on again. Otherwise, you might experience sluggish response.

(10) Accent and Aicom are registered trademarks of Aicom Corporation.

APOLLO BY DOLPHIN SYSTEMS

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Apollo synthesizer are in the APOLLO.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. 1 to 6 active for changing voices. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. 1 to 8 active for changing languages. STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. Clear to Send. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Full.

NOTES:

1. The Apollo synthesizer changes baud rate by using different cables. When the synthesizer is shipped, the baud rate in the .TTS file is set to 9600. If you have a cable that is different from 9600 baud, change the .TTS file to match your cable.

2. This synthesizer supports several languages. A different language ROM chip is required for each language. Make sure that you have the correct ROM chip for the language you want.

3. On this synthesizer, an On/Off knob controls volume.

AUDAPTER BY PERSONAL DATA SYSTEMS

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Audapter synthesizer are in the AUD.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None.


(11) Apollo is a trademark of Dolphin Systems.

(12) Audapter is a trademark of Personal Data Systems.

LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. 1 to 9 active for changing voices from high (1) to low (9). STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. Clear to Send. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower.

BRAILLE 'N SPEAK AND BRAILLE BLAZER BY BLAZIE ENGINEERING

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Braille Blazer and Braille 'n Speak products are in the BLAZIE.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. 1 and 9 active. VOLUME. Active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. Not active. STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower.

CALLTEXT 5050/5010 AND PROSE 2020 BY CENTIGRAM COMMUNICATIONS CORP.

NOTE: The manufacturer of these synthesizers was formerly Speech Plus Corporation.

SOFTWARE SETTINGS


(13) Braille Blazer and Braille 'n Speak are trademarks of Blaize Engineering.

The following values for the CallText 5050 and Prose 2020 synthesizers are in the SP.TTS file. Note that these values are the same for the CallText 5050 and Prose 2020. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. Not active. STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. Yes. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower.

DECTALK BY DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the DECtalk synthesizer are in the DEC1.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change these values.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 1200. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Volume is controlled by a thumb-wheel on the unit. PITCH. 1 to 9 active. SPECIAL. 1 to 9 active for changing voices (refer to note). STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower. BUFFER MANAGEMENT. Yes.


(14) CallText 5050/5010 is a trademark and Prose 2020 is a registered trademark of Centigram Communications Corporation.

(15) DECtalk is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation.

NOTE: The DEC1.TTS file is set with Special 1 to 9 active for changing voices. These are the voices:

1. Perfect Paul. 2. Beautiful Betty. 3. Huge Harry. 4. Doctor Dennis. 5. Kit the Kid. 6. Rough Rita. 7. Uppity Ursula. 8. Frail Frank. 9. Whispering Wendy.

HARDWARE SETTINGS

A thumb-wheel on the back of the synthesizer controls volume.

NOTE: You might notice halting speech or pauses you do not expect. If you want to smooth that speech (at the expense of responsive Stop), toggle Buffer Management and Smart Talk to No.

ECHO BY ECHO CORPORATION.

NOTE: The manufacturer of this synthesizer was formerly Street Electronics.

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the ECHO synthesizer are in the ECHO.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. 1 and 9 active. VOLUME. Active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. Not active. STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. Clear to Send. INDEXING. No. CHARACTER SET. Lower.


(16) ECHO is a trademark of Echo Corporation.

ECHO-PC BY ECHO CORPORATION

NOTE: The manufacturer of this synthesizer was formerly Street Electronics.

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the ECHO-PC synthesizer are in the ECHOPC.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. Not Active. STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower. BUFFER MANAGEMENT. No.

KEYNOTE GOLD BY PULSE DATA INTERNATIONAL, LTD.

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Keynote Gold synthesizer are in the GOLD.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Not active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. Active (refer to notes). STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF INDEXING. Yes.


(17) ECHO-PC is a trademark of Echo Corporation.

(18) Keynote Gold is a trademark of Pulse Data International, Ltd.

CHARACTER SET. Full.

NOTES:

1. The GOLD.TTS file is set with Special 1 to 4 for different languages (if they are installed). The languages are:

1. English. 2. Spanish. 3. French. 4. German.

Special 5 is not set.

Special 6 to 9 are set to control the intonation as follows:

6. Reverse intonation. 7. Normal intonation. 8. Emphatic intonation. 9. Very emphatic intonation.

2. The Keynote Gold synthesizer requires a special EPROM in order to work with Screen Reader/2. Please contact the manufacturer or the local dealer.

3. If you bought your synthesizer before March, 1993, use the GOLD.TTS file.

4. If you bought your synthesizer after March, 1993, use the GOLD2.TTS file.

PERSONAL SPEECH SYSTEM BY VYSION INCORPORATED

NOTE: The manufacturer of this synthesizer was formerly Votrax Incorporated.

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Personal Speech System synthesizer are in the PSS.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 2400. PARITY. Odd. LENGTH. 7 bits, parity ignored. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. 1, 2, 3, 5, 9 active.

(19) Votrax is a registered trademark of Votrax Incorporated.

VOLUME. Active. PITCH. 1, 2, 5, 9 active. SPECIAL. Not active. STOP DELAY. 4. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. Clear to Send. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower.

HARDWARE SETTINGS

The communication switch is set for parallel. You must change this switch from parallel to serial communications. Also ensure that the switch settings on your synthesizer are set to 2400 baud.

SWITCH-BANK LOCATION

One switch bank for the Personal Speech System is located inside the unit. The switches are accessible through a slot in the back-right corner of the unit. Use a ballpoint pen or a similar tool to set the switches.

SWITCH SETTINGS

For serial communications and 2400 baud, set all switches Down except switch 2. That switch should be in the Up position.

PORTABLE DECTALK BY DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION AND MULTIVOICE BY INSTITUTE ON APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Portable DECtalk and MultiVoice synthesizers are in the DEC2.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. 1, 2, 3, 4 reduce the volume (1=maximum reduction, 4=slight reduction). 6, 7, 8, 9 increase the volume (6=slight increase, 9=maximum increase).


(20) MultiVoice is a trademark of Institute on Applied Technology.

PITCH. 1 to 9 active. SPECIAL. 1 to 9 active for changing voices (refer to note). STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower. BUFFER MANAGEMENT. Yes.

NOTE: The DEC2.TTS file is set with Special 1 to 9 active for changing voices. These are the voices:

1. Perfect Paul. 2. Beautiful Betty. 3. Huge Harry. 4. Doctor Dennis. 5. Kit the Kid. 6. Rough Rita. 7. Uppity Ursula. 8. Frail Frank. 9. Whispering Wendy.

HARDWARE SETTINGS

The On/Off knob in the front of the MultiVoice unit also controls the volume.

NOTE: You might notice halting speech or pauses you do not expect. If you want to smooth that speech (at the expense of responsive Stop), toggle Buffer Management and Smart Talk to No.

READING EDGE BY XEROX IMAGING SYSTEMS

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the Reading Edge scanner are in the XEROX.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1. BAUD RATE. 9600. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Active (refer to notes). PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. Active (refer to notes). STOP DELAY. 0.


(21) Reading Edge is a trademark of XEROX Imaging Systems.

ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Lower. BUFFER MANAGEMENT. Yes.

NOTES:

1. The XEROX.TTS file is set with Volume 3 to 7 for levels of intonation as follows:

Volume 1 and 2 are not active.

Volume 3 to 7 are set to control the intonation as follows:

3. Intonation is 0% of normal. 4. Intonation is 50% of normal. 5. Normal intonation. 6. Intonation is 150% of normal. 7. Intonation is 200% of normal.

Volume 8 and 9 are not active.

2. The XEROX.TTS file is set with Special 1 through 9 to control voices as follows:

1. Perfect Paul. 2. Beautiful Betty. 3. Huge Harry. 4. Frail Frank. 5. Kit the Kid. 6. Rough Rita. 7. Uppity Ursula. 8. Doctor Dennis. 9. Whispering Wendy.

3. You might notice halting speech or pauses you do not expect. If you want to smooth that speech (at the expense of responsive Stop), toggle Buffer Management and Smart Talk to No.

VOXBOX BY INFOVOX

SOFTWARE SETTINGS

The following values for the VoxBox synthesizer are in the VOX.TTS file. You can use the Screen Reader/2 Synthesizer Settings notebook to change them.

COM PORT. COM1.


(22) VoxBox is a trademark of InfoVox.

BAUD RATE. 4800. PARITY. None. LENGTH. 8 bits. STOP BITS. 1 stop bit. RATE. Active. VOLUME. Active. PITCH. Active. SPECIAL. 1 to 9 active for changing languages and response modes (refer to note). STOP DELAY. 0. ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. No. ALWAYS STOP. Yes. PROTOCOL. XON/XOFF. INDEXING. Yes. CHARACTER SET. Convert.

NOTE: The Special settings for the InfoVox are as follows:

1. The language in ROM slot 1. 2. The language in ROM slot 2. 3. The language in ROM slot 3. 4. The language in ROM slot 4. 5. The language in ROM slot 5. 6. The language in ROM slot 6. 7. The language in ROM slot 7. 8. Changes to the normal response mode; improves prosody. 9. Changes to the fast response mode; default.

HARDWARE SETTINGS

You must set some of the InfoVox switches for it to work with Screen Reader/2.

SWITCH-BANKS LOCATIONS

The unit contains three switch banks. These are located, if the back of the synthesizer is facing you, in the lower mid-section of the panel and to the right of the parallel and serial connectors.

Use a ballpoint pen or other similar tool to set the switches. If the switches are pushed toward the bottom of the synthesizer, they are On. If they are positioned toward the top of the synthesizer, they are Off.

SWITCH SETTINGS

The settings for the three banks follow:

For Bank 1 (left):

Switch 1 is On. Switch 2 is Off. Switches 3 to 7 are On. Switch 8 is Off.

For Bank 2 (middle):

Switch 1 is On. Switch 2 is Off. Switches 3 to 7 are On. Switch 8 is Off.

For Bank 3 (right):

Switches 1 to 7 are Off. Switch 8 is On.

NOTE: Ensure that you have the correct cable and that you connect the synthesizer cable to the computer correctly. The correct cable has female connectors on both ends. Connect the cable to the host-computer connector on the synthesizer (the male connector leftmost at the back of the synthesizer unit, if it is facing you) and to the serial connector on your computer.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

The following sections address Screen Reader/2 features that you need to know about, but are not likely to use often:

"Changes to Screen Reader/2 1.0". "Help for Error Messages". "Recalling Screen Reader/2 Settings". "Migrating Windows Applications".

CHANGES TO SCREEN READER/2

There are several things that have changed since Screen Reader/2 version 1.0. This section outlines these changes so that you will be able to use the new Screen Reader/2 quickly and efficiently.

PRESENTATION MANAGER KEY SEQUENCES

Some P M key sequences that started with C in the previous version of Screen Reader/2 have been changed to leave the C key sequences available for application-specific profiles. (CHORD B S has also been changed.)

The list below includes each former key sequence, the key sequence to which it has been changed, and the function.

C then H has changed to chord 7 8 then S. Chord 7 8 then S will read static text.

Chord B S has changed to chord 7 8 then C. Chord 7 8 then C will display the Desktop context menu.

Chord C 9 then n has changed to chord 7 9 then n. Chord 7 9 then n will set up the Screen Reader/2 switch list by associating the current window with keypad key n.

C then 9 then n has changed to chord 8 9 then n. Chord 8 9 then n will make window n the foreground window.

C then 0 has changed to chord 7 8 then 7. Chord 7 8 then 7 will announce the window type and type of control at the current Screen Reader/2 pointer position.

C then 8 has changed to chord 7 8 then 8. Chord 7 8 then 8 will announce the program name and window title.

Chord C 8 has changed to chord 7 8 then 9. Chord 7 8 then 9 will display a list of windows in the current application.

NOTE: Key sequence C THEN C still announces the cursor line or selector.

AUTOMATIC STARTUP

In the previous version, you could run the DESK program after you installed Screen Reader/2 to change the way the desktop was organized. In the new version, the installation program does this for you automatically.

NOTE: If you did not run DESK in the previous version, you may prefer to use the original desktop layout. Refer to "OS/2 Desktop" for information on restoring the original desktop.

DESKTOP FOLDER FOR SCREEN READER/2

In the previous version, you started Screen Reader/2 from the Screen Reader/2 Folder. This folder contained the following objects:

Screen Reader/2.

OS/2 Keys.

User's Guide.

PAL Reference.

Configuration File.

In the new version, you start Screen Reader/2 by opening the Independence Series folder. This folder contains the following objects:

On-Line Books -- Screen Reader/2.

Configuration File -- Screen Reader/2.

Screen Reader/2.

NOTE: If you have other Independence Series software installed, it may also contain other objects.

CHANGES TO SCREEN READER/2 1.1

There are several things that have changed since the previous version of Screen Reader/2. Refer to the Screen Reader/2 version 1.2 Installation Guide for these changes. The information is available in print and on cassette.

This new release of Screen Reader/2 enables users to have ScreenReader/2 version 1.2 and Screen Magnifier/2 on a system and to have them work together.

This release also includes the following updates:

1. More profiles

We have included three new sample profiles:

LOTUS 1-2-3 FOR OS/2 This profile makes it easier to use Lotus 1-2-3 release 2.0 for OS/2 with Screen Reader/2. You can find its description with the Presentation Manager profiles in this Screen Reader/2 User's Guide . AMIPRO FOR WINDOWS This sample profile enables you to use the word processor AmiPro version 3.01 with Screen Reader/2. Its description is listed with the Windows profiles in this User's Guide.

2. DOS profiles now loaded automatically

Now, whenever you start a DOS program listed in this User's Guide, a profile for that program will be automatically added to the profile tier.

3. Indexing supported for Blazie Engineering products

If you use the Braille Blazer or the Braille'n Speak, you will find that indexing works. We updated the synthesizer section of this User's Guide to reflect this change. The synthesizer sections in the printed and cassette versions of Getting Started remain unchanged.

4. Updated help and error messages

We have reworked Screen Reader/2 error messages to be more understandable and useful. In addition, we enhanced help for the Screen Reader/2 notebooks.

HELP FOR ERROR MESSAGES

If an error message is displayed, you can obtain more information about the cause of the error and how to correct it. At an OS/2 command prompt, type help, followed by the number of the error that you encountered. For example, if you encounter an error with the identifying number ERR1234, you would type help ERR1234. Screen Reader/2 will display information about the error.

RECALLING SCREEN READER/2 SETTINGS

If you think you saved your Screen Reader/2 state settings but they were not active the next time you used the program, it may be because you have changed the profile tier in which the settings were saved. The profile tier must be exactly as it was when you saved the settings. If you change the current profile tier to be identical to the one in which you saved your settings, the settings will be restored automatically.

SCREEN READER/2 KEY SEQUENCES

This appendix contains a complete listing of all base Screen Reader/2 key sequences. The first section lists the Screen Reader/2 core keys sequentially. For example, all of the key sequences that start with A, then those that start with B, and so on.

The second section lists the key sequences by function. For example, all of the reading keys, then the spelling keys, and so on.

BASE KEYS

The Screen Reader/2 base keys read information on the screen, announce format changes, and turn switches On or Off.

Basic Keys:

1. Reads the previous line. 2. Reads the current line. 3. Reads the next line. 4. Reads the previous word. 5. Reads the current word. 6. Reads the next word. 7. Reads the previous character. 8. Reads the current character. 9. Reads the next character. HELP. Toggles Help mode On or Off. STOP. Stops speech.

Key sequences that start with 0 are:

001 TO 009. Reads lines 1 through 9. 010 TO 019. Reads lines 10 through 19. 020 TO 029. Reads lines 20 through 29. 030 TO 039. Reads lines 30 through 39. 040 TO 049. Reads lines 40 through 49. 050 TO 059. Reads lines 50 through 59. 060 TO 069. Reads lines 60 through 69. CHORD 0 1. Reads the rest of the screen from the line above the current position. CHORD 0 2. Reads the rest of the screen from the current position. CHORD 0 3. Reads the rest of the screen from the line below the current position. 0 7. Reads the character above. 0 8. Announces the color of the current character. 0 9. Reads the character below. 0 A. Reads the entire screen.

0 B. Reads the rest of the screen from the current position. 0 C. Reads the rest of the line. 0 D. Moves the pointer to the right edge of the viewport. 0 #. Moves the pointer to the bottom left of the viewport. 0 *. Moves the pointer to the top left of the viewport. 0 H. Announces the time. CHORD 0 7. Toggles setting and clearing the default color. CHORD 0 8. Toggles Color Scan On or Off. CHORD 0 H. Announces the date. CHORD 0 S. Toggles the time autospeak On or Off.

Key sequences that start with * are:

  • 1. Reads the previous field.
  • 2. Reads the current field.
  • 3. Reads the next field.
  • 4. Spells the previous word.
  • 5. Spells the current word.
  • 6. Spells the next word.
  • 7. Spells the previous character using the

phonetic alphabet.

  • 8. Spells the current character using the

phonetic alphabet.

  • 9. Spells the next character using the phonetic

alphabet.

  • 0. Switches to pronounce format.
  • A. Reads the rest of the current field.
  • B. Spells the current word with capitals.
  • C. Announces the ASCII value of the current

character.

  • D. Switches to phonetic format.
  • H. Sets the field definition for foreground or

background color, or a mixture of both.

  • *. Switches to text format.
  • #. Switches to spell format.

CHORD * 2. Toggles Font Scan On or Off. CHORD * A. Announces the font of the current character. CHORD * H. Toggles between inclusion and exclusion of font changes in field definitions.

Key sequences that start with # are:

  1. 1. Searches for a string you specify from the

top.

  1. 2. Continues forward search.
  2. 3. Searches for the current string from the top.
  3. 4. Announces the keyboard lock-key status.
  4. 5. Announces current format.
  5. 6. Announces the current viewport status.
  6. 8. Announces the pointer position.
  7. 9. Announces the current mode and position

status.

  1. 0. Turns on pointer mode.
  2. A. Adds a profile to the tier.
  3. B. Toggles reporting keyboard lock-key status On

or Off.

  1. C. Announces the cursor position.
  2. D. Turns on cursor mode.
  3. H. Starts ignoring one or more characters.
  4. #. Moves the pointer to the cursor or selector.
  5. *. Moves the cursor to the pointer. (This key

sequence may not work on non-IBM machines.) CHORD # 1. Searches backwards from the bottom for a string you specify. CHORD # 2. Continues backward search. CHORD # 3. Searches backward from the bottom for the previous string. CHORD # A. Removes a profile from the tier. CHORD # B. Announces the Screen Reader/2 version and the active profiles for the current session. CHORD # H. Stops ignoring one or more characters. CHORD # S. Resets ignore.

Key sequences that start with A are:

A 1 N. Sets pitch (1 to 9). A 2 N. Sets rate (1 to 9). A 3 N. Sets volume (1 to 9). A 4. Toggles Caps On or Off. A 5. Toggles Spaces On or Off. A 6. Toggles Dictionary On or Off. A 7. Toggles Pause On or Off. A 8. Toggles Wrap On or Off. A 9. Toggles line Numbering On or Off. A 0. Toggles ForceSpell On or Off. A A N. Sets Special Codes (1 to 9). A B. Toggles Graphics On or Off. A C. Cycles through word-definition settings (alphabetic, alphanumeric, and nonblank). A #. Announces the status of switches and the talking level in effect. A *. Toggles Key Echo On or Off. CHORD A 3. Announces the status for scan. CHORD A 4. Toggles Caps Scan On or Off. CHORD A 6. Toggles Trailing characters On or Off. CHORD A 7. Cycles through mixed-case handling. CHORD A 0. Toggles SpellCaps On or Off. CHORD A S. Sets the amount of talking (chatty, moderate, or quiet level) . CHORD A 1 THEN 0. Announces values from last event key pressed (flag byte, scan code, character code in decimal). CHORD A 1 THEN 1. Toggles between having the pop-up keypad active on the right or left. CHORD A 1 THEN 2. Sets up the pop-up keypad Hot key and Stop key.

CHORD A 1 THEN 3. Toggles between the keyboard beeping or not beeping. CHORD A 1 THEN 4. Toggles between disabling only the keyboard keys of the pop-up keypad or the entire typing area of the keyboard while the pop-up keypad is active. CHORD A 1 THEN 5. Announces the status of the pop-up keypad settings. CHORD A 1 THEN B. Toggles the pop-up keypad Hot key and the Stop key On or Off. CHORD A 2 THEN N. Redefines the pop-up keypad key n to another keyboard key. CHORD A 2 THEN S. Stops redefining pop-up keypad key n. CHORD A 5 THEN N. Sets the number of spaces that you want Screen Reader/2 to announce between words. (n can be any number from 1 to 9; the default is 2.)

Key sequences that start with B are:

B 1. Reads the first word of the current line. B 2. Reads the middle word of the current line. B 3. Reads the last word of the current line. B 4. Reads the rest of the word above. B 5. Reads the rest of the current word. B 6. Reads the rest of the word below. B 7. Announces the position of the left edge of the column viewer. B 8. Announces the location of the column viewer and how many columns there are. B 9. Announces the position of the right edge of the column viewer. B A. Defines viewport 1 through 9. B B N. Makes viewport n the active viewport (n can be any number from 1 to 9). B B B. Sets the viewport to the full view. B C. Sets the bottom-right corner of the viewport. B D. Toggles user-defined autospeaks On or Off. B D B. Turns off all active autospeaks. B *. Saves all Screen Reader/2 settings. B # N. Announces the screen coordinates of viewport n or autospeak n. B 0. Defines autospeaks 1 through 9. CHORD B 1. Reads from the top of the column to the current column-viewer position. CHORD B 2. Moves the column viewer up one line and reads the column entry. CHORD B 3. Moves the column viewer to the top of column. CHORD B 4. Moves the column viewer left one column and reads the column entry, or sets the left edge manually. CHORD B 5. Reads the current column entry.

CHORD B 6. Moves the column viewer right one column and reads the column entry, or sets the right edge manually. CHORD B 7. Reads from the current column-viewer position down to the bottom of the column. CHORD B 8. Moves the column viewer down one line and reads the column entry. CHORD B 9. Moves the column viewer to the bottom of the column. CHORD B 0. Displays the Customization menu. CHORD B A. Defines a column. CHORD B *. Moves the column viewer to the previous position. Press this chord twice to go back two positions. CHORD B H. Starts the tutorial. B CHORD B 1. Moves to column 1. B CHORD B 2. Moves to column 2. B CHORD B 3. Moves to column 3. B CHORD B 4. Moves to column 4. B CHORD B 5. Moves to column 5. B CHORD B 6. Moves to column 6. B CHORD B 7. Moves to column 7. B CHORD B 8. Moves to column 8. B CHORD B 9. Moves to column 9. B CHORD B A N. Reassigns a column number.

Key sequences that start with C are reserved for application profiles, except:

C C. Announces the cursor line or selector in Presentation Manager.

Key sequences that start with D are:

D 1. Reads previous sentence.. D 2. Reads current sentence. D 3. Reads next sentence. D 7. Toggles Character Echo On or Off. D 8. Toggles Word Echo On or Off. D 9. Toggles Line Echo On or Off. D 0. Toggles Column Browse On or Off. D A. Reads current paragraph. D B. Toggles the flush of text being spoken On or Off. D C. Announces the currently active browse and echo modes. D D. Switches to default edit facility, turning Line Browse On, echoes Off, and flush On. D #. Toggles current edit facility selections. D *. Toggles Line Browse On or Off. CHORD D 2. Toggles between one-space and two-space sentence termination. CHORD D 7. Shifts the margin alert to the left by one character. CHORD D 8. Cycles through margin alert types.

CHORD D 9. Shifts the margin alert to the right by one character. CHORD D 0. Announces the current status of icon speaking (All, Known, or Not Speaking Icons) CHORD D #. Associates a text string with the current icon to identify it. CHORD D *. Toggles the announcing of icons to All, Known, or Not Speaking Icons. CHORD D C THEN 7. Cycles through deletion feedback and destructive backspace types. CHORD D C THEN 8. Announces the length of the deletion look-ahead. CHORD D C THEN 9. Cycles through lengths of the deletion look-ahead (3 through 20). CHORD D C THEN C. Toggles function-keys processing On or Off. CHORD D C THEN 0. Enables and disables edit facility for controls. CHORD D C THEN D. Toggles the browse talking level between chatty and moderate.

Key sequences that start with 1 are:

CHORD 1 2 THEN 4. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the Desktop. CHORD 1 2 THEN 5. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the view. CHORD 1 2 THEN 6. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the viewport. CHORD 1 2 THEN 7. Changes the view up one level to the parent window or the Desktop. CHORD 1 2 THEN 8. Resets the view to the focus window. CHORD 1 2 THEN 9. Changes the view down one level to a child window. CHORD 1 2 THEN *. Changes the view to the next OS/2 text window. CHORD 1 2 THEN A. Announces vertical scroll-bar information. CHORD 1 2 THEN B. Announces horizontal scroll-bar information. CHORD 1 2 THEN C. Changes the view to the next sibling window. CHORD 1 2 THEN H. Reads the description for the highlighted setting in the DOS Settings or Win-OS/2 Settings Notebook.

Key sequences that start with 2 are:

CHORD 2 3 THEN 1. Toggles moving the mouse to follow the Screen Reader/2 pointer On or Off. CHORD 2 3 THEN 3. Toggles mouse tracking On or Off. CHORD 2 3 THEN 4. Simulates a single click on mouse button 1.

CHORD 2 3 THEN 5. Simulates a double click on mouse button 1. CHORD 2 3 THEN 6. Simulates a single click on mouse button 2. CHORD 2 3 THEN 8. Announces the window containing the mouse pointer. CHORD 2 3 THEN A. Moves the mouse pointer to the Screen Reader/2 pointer. CHORD 2 3 THEN B. Simulates a double click on mouse button 2. CHORD 2 3 THEN C. Cycles through the mouse-movement types: Horizontal only. Vertical only. Horizontal and vertical (the default). CHORD 2 3 THEN H. Announces the status of mouse settings (mouse movement with pointer, mouse tracking, and mouse-movement settings).

Key sequences that start with 7 are:

CHORD 7 8 THEN 7. Announces the window type and type of control at the current Screen Reader/2 pointer position. CHORD 7 8 THEN 8. Announces the program name and window title. CHORD 7 8 THEN 9. Displays a list of windows in the current application. CHORD 7 8 THEN S. Reads static text. CHORD 7 8 THEN C. Displays the Desktop context menu. (This key sequence may not work on non-IBM machines.) CHORD 7 8 THEN D. Toggles drawing noise On or Off. CHORD 7 9 THEN N. Sets up the Screen Reader/2 switch list by associating the current window with keypad key n. CHORD 7 9 THEN H. Clears the switch list.

Key sequences that start with 8 are:

CHORD 8 9 THEN N. Makes window n the foreground window. CHORD 8 9 THEN N is used to switch to the window established by CHORD 7 9 THEN N. CHORD 8 9 THEN H. Announces the switch-list entries and their assigned keys.

KEY SEQUENCES BY FUNCTION

This section lists all of the Screen Reader/2 key sequences according to the function for which they are used.

ANNOUNCE KEYS

0 8. Announces the color of the current character.

  • C. Announces the ASCII value of the

current character. CHORD * A. Announces the font of the current character.

  1. 4. Announces the keyboard lock-key status.
  2. 5. Announces the current format.
  3. 6. Announces the current viewport status.
  4. 8. Announces the pointer position.
  5. 9. Announces the current mode and position

status.

  1. C. Announces the cursor position.

CHORD # B. Announces the Screen Reader/2 version and the active profiles for the current session. A #. Announces the status of switches and the talking level in effect. CHORD A 1 THEN 5. Announces the status of the pop-up keypad settings. B # N. Announces the screen coordinates of viewport n or autospeak n. D C. Announces the currently active browse and echo functions. CHORD D C THEN 8. Announces the length of the deletion look-ahead check.

COLUMN-VIEWER KEYS

CHORD B A. Defines a column. CHORD B 0. Displays the Customization menu. B 8. Announces the location of the column viewer and how many columns there are. B 7. Announces the position of the left edge of the column viewer. B 9. Announces the position of the right edge of the column viewer. CHORD B 1. Reads from the top of the column to the current column-viewer position. CHORD B 5. Reads the current column entry. CHORD B 7. Reads from the current column-viewer position down to the bottom of the column. CHORD B 2. Moves the column viewer up one line and reads the column entry. CHORD B 8. Moves the column viewer down one line and reads the column entry.

CHORD B 4. Moves column viewer left one column and reads the column entry, or sets the left edge manually. CHORD B 6. Moves column viewer right one column and reads the column entry, or sets the right edge manually. CHORD B 3. Moves the column viewer to the top of the column. CHORD B 9. Moves the column viewer to the bottom of the column. CHORD B *. Moves the column viewer to the previous position. Press this chord twice to go back 2 positions. B CHORD B 1. Moves to column 1. B CHORD B 2. Moves to column 2. B CHORD B 3. Moves to column 3. B CHORD B 4. Moves to column 4. B CHORD B 5. Moves to column 5. B CHORD B 6. Moves to column 6. B CHORD B 7. Moves to column 7. B CHORD B 8. Moves to column 8. B CHORD B 9. Moves to column 9. B CHORD B A N. Reassigns a column number for ease of use.

CURSOR/POINTER KEYS

  1. 8. Announces the pointer position.
  2. 9. Announces the current mode and position status.
  3. 0. Turns on pointer mode.
  4. C. Announces the cursor position.
  5. D. Turns on cursor mode.
  6. #. Moves the pointer to the cursor or selector.
  7. *. Moves the cursor to the pointer. (This key

sequence may not work with non-IBM machines.)

EDIT KEYS

D 7. Toggles Character Echo On or Off. D 8. Toggles Word Echo On or Off. D 9. Toggles Line Echo On or Off. D 0. Toggles Column Browse On or Off. D C. Announces the currently active browse and echo functions. D D. Switches to normal edit facility, turning Line Browse On, echoes Off, and flush On. D #. Toggles current selections. D *. Toggles Line Browse On or Off. CHORD D 2. Toggles between one-space and two-space sentence termination. CHORD D 7. Shifts the margin alert to the left by one character. CHORD D 8. Cycles through margin alerts.

CHORD D 9. Shifts the margin alert to the right by one character. CHORD D C THEN 7. Cycles through deletion feedback and destructive backspace types. CHORD D C THEN 8. Announces the length of the deletion look-ahead check. CHORD D C THEN 9. Changes the length of the deletion look-ahead check length. CHORD D C THEN C. Toggles function-key processing On or Off. CHORD D C THEN 0. Enables and disables edits for a particular type of view. CHORD D C THEN D. Defines the browse talking level.

FORMAT KEYS

  • *. Switches to text format.
  • #. Switches to spell format.
  • D. Switches to phonetic format.
  • 0. Switches to pronounce format.

ICON KEYS

CHORD D 0. Announces the current status of icon speaking (All, Known, or Not Speaking Icons). CHORD D #. Associates a text string with the current icon to identify it. CHORD D *. Toggles the announcing of icons to All, Known, or Not Speaking Icons.

LEVEL/VOLUME/RATE KEYS

A #. Announces the status of switches and the talking level in effect. CHORD A S. Sets the amount of talking (chatty, moderate, or quiet level). A 1 N. Sets pitch (1 to 9). A 2 N. Sets rate (1 to 9). A 3 N. Sets volume (1 to 9).

MISCELLANEOUS KEYS

  1. A. Adds a profile to the tier.

CHORD # A. Removes a profile from the tier. CHORD B H. Starts the tutorial.

MOUSE KEYS

CHORD 2 3 THEN 1. Toggles moving the mouse to follow the Screen Reader/2 pointer On or Off. CHORD 2 3 THEN 3. Toggles mouse tracking On or Off. CHORD 2 3 THEN 4. Simulates a single click on mouse button 1. CHORD 2 3 THEN 5. Simulates a double click on mouse button 1. CHORD 2 3 THEN 6. Simulates a single click on mouse button 2. CHORD 2 3 THEN 8. Announces the window containing the mouse pointer. CHORD 2 3 THEN A. Moves the mouse pointer to the Screen Reader/2 pointer. CHORD 2 3 THEN B. Sets mouse button 2 to respond to double clicks. CHORD 2 3 THEN C. Cycles through the following mouse movements: Horizontal only. Vertical only. Both vertical and horizontal. (This is the default.) CHORD 2 3 THEN H. Announces the status of mouse settings (mouse movement with pointer, mouse tracking, and mouse-movement settings).

MOVE KEYS

0 D. Moves the pointer to the right edge of the viewport. 0 #. Moves the pointer to the bottom left of the viewport. 0 *. Moves the pointer to the top left of the viewport.

  1. #. Moves the pointer to the cursor or selector.
  2. *. Moves the cursor to the pointer. (This key

sequence may not work on non-IBM machines.)

POP-UP KEYPAD KEYS

CHORD A 1 THEN 1. Toggles between having the pop-up keypad active on the right or the left. CHORD A 1 THEN 2. Sets up the Hot key and the Stop key for the pop-up keypad. CHORD A 1 THEN 3. Toggles between the keyboard beeping and not beeping. Audible feedback is the default. CHORD A 1 THEN 4. Toggles between disabling only the keyboard keys of the pop-up keypad or the entire typing area of the keyboard while the pop-up keypad is active. CHORD A 1 THEN 5. Announces the status of the pop-up keypad settings.

CHORD A 1 THEN B. Toggles the Hot key and Stop key On or Off. CHORD A 2 THEN N. Redefines pop-up keypad key n to another keyboard key. CHORD A 2 THEN S. Stops redefining pop-up keypad key n.

PRESENTATION MANAGER KEY SEQUENCES

CHORD 7 8 THEN 8. Announces the program name and window title. CHORD 7 9 THEN N. Sets up the Screen Reader/2 switch list by associating the current window with keypad key n. CHORD 7 9 THEN H. Clears the switch list. You are asked to confirm that you want to clear the entries. CHORD 8 9 THEN H. Announces the switch-list entries and their assigned keys. CHORD 8 9 THEN N. Makes window n the foreground window. CHORD 8 9 THEN N is used to switch to the window established by CHORD 7 9 THEN N. CHORD 7 8 THEN 7. Announces the window type and type of control at the current Screen Reader/2 pointer position. C C. Announces the cursor line or selector. CHORD 7 8 THEN S. Reads static text. CHORD 7 8 THEN 9. Displays a list of windows in the current application. CHORD 1 2 THEN 4. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the Desktop. CHORD 1 2 THEN 5. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the view. CHORD 1 2 THEN 6. Announces the pointer location in pixels relative to the viewport. CHORD 1 2 THEN 7. Changes the view up one level to the parent window or the Desktop. CHORD 1 2 THEN 8. Resets the view to the focus window. CHORD 1 2 THEN 9. Changes the view down one level to a child window. CHORD 1 2 THEN C. Changes the view to the next sibling window. CHORD 1 2 THEN *. Changes the view to the next OS/2 text window. CHORD 1 2 THEN A. Announces vertical scroll-bar information. CHORD 1 2 THEN B. Announces horizontal scroll-bar information. CHORD 1 2 THEN H. Reads the description for the highlighted setting in the DOS Settings or Win-OS/2 Settings Notebook. CHORD 7 8 THEN D. Toggles drawing noise On or Off.

CHORD 7 8 THEN C. Displays the Desktop context menu. (This key sequence may not work on non-IBM machines.)

READ KEYS

1. Reads the previous line. 2. Reads the current line. 3. Reads the next line. 4. Reads the previous word. 5. Reads the current word. 6. Reads the next word. 7. Reads the previous character. 8. Reads the current character. 9. Reads the next character. 001 TO 009. Reads lines 1 through 9. 010 TO 019. Reads lines 10 through 19. 020 TO 029. Reads lines 20 through 29. 030 TO 039. Reads lines 30 through 39. 040 TO 049. Reads lines 40 through 49. 050 TO 059. Reads lines 50 through 59. 060 TO 069. Reads lines 60 through 69. CHORD 0 1. Reads the rest of the screen from the line above the current position. CHORD 0 2. Reads the rest of the screen from the current position. CHORD 0 3. Reads the rest of the screen from the line below the current position. 0 7. Reads the character above. 0 9. Reads the character below. 0 A. Reads the entire screen. 0 B. Reads the rest of the screen from the current position. 0 C. Reads the rest of the line.

  • 1. Reads the previous field.
  • 2. Reads the current field.
  • 3. Reads the next field.
  • A. Reads the rest of the current field.

B 1. Reads the first word of the current line. B 2. Reads the middle word of the current line. B 3. Reads the last word of the current line. B 4. Reads the rest of the word above. B 5. Reads the rest of the current word. B 6. Reads the rest of the word below. D 1. Reads the previous sentence. D 2. Reads the current sentence. D 3. Reads the next sentence. D A. Reads the current paragraph. STOP. Stops speech.

SCAN KEYS

CHORD 0 7. Toggles setting and clearing the default color. CHORD 0 8. Toggles Color Scan On or Off. CHORD A 3. Announces the status for scan. CHORD A 4. Toggles Caps Scan On or Off. CHORD A 7. Cycles through mixed case handling: Says cap before each capital letter. Says mixed and cap. Says caps only to separate words. Says mixed only. CHORD * 2. Toggles Font Scan On or Off.

SEARCH KEYS

  1. 1. Searches for a string you specify from the top.
  2. 2. Continues forward search.
  3. 3. Searches for the current string from the top.

CHORD # 1. Searches backward from the bottom for a string you specify. CHORD # 2. Continues backward search. CHORD # 3. Searches backward from the bottom for the previous string.

SET DEFINITION KEYS

  • H. Sets the definition for foreground or background color, or a mixture of both.
  1. H. Starts ignoring one or more characters.

CHORD # H. Stops ignoring one or more characters. CHORD # S. Resets ignore.

  1. D. Turns on cursor mode.
  2. 0. Turns on pointer mode.

A 1 N. Sets pitch (n can be any number from 1 to 9). A 2 N. Sets rate (n can be any number from 1 to 9). A 3 N. Sets volume (n can be any number from 1 to 9). A A N. Sets Special Codes (n can be any number from 1 to 9). CHORD A 1 THEN 2. Sets up the Hot key and the Stop key. CHORD A 5 THEN N. Sets the number of spaces that you want Screen Reader/2 to announce between words. (n can be any number from 1 to 9; the default is 2.) A C. Cycles through word-definition settings (alphabetic, alphanumeric, and nonblank). CHORD A S. Sets the amount of talking (chatty, moderate, or quiet). B C. Sets the bottom-right corner of the viewport.

B B B. Sets the viewport to the full view. B *. Saves all Screen Reader/2 settings.

SPELL KEYS

  • 4. Spells the previous word.
  • 5. Spells the current word.
  • 6. Spells the next word.
  • 7. Spells the previous character using the phonetic alphabet.
  • 8. Spells the current character using the phonetic alphabet.
  • 9. Spells the next character using the phonetic alphabet.
  • B. Spells the current word with capitals.

TIME KEYS

0 H. Announces the time. CHORD 0 H. Announces the date. CHORD 0 S. Toggles the time autospeak On or Off. The default is Off.

TOGGLE KEYS

HELP. Toggles Help mode On or Off. CHORD * 2. Toggles Font Scan On or Off. CHORD * H. Toggles between inclusion and exclusion of font changes in field definitions.

  1. B. Toggles reporting keyboard lock-key status On or Off.

A 4. Toggles Caps On or Off. A 5. Toggles Spaces On or Off. A 6. Toggles Dictionary On or Off. A 7. Toggles Pause On or Off. A 8. Toggles Wrap On or Off. A 9. Toggles Numbering On or Off. A 0. Toggles ForceSpell On or Off. A B. Toggles Graphics On or Off. A *. Toggles Key Echo On or Off. CHORD A 1 THEN 1. Toggles between having the pop-up keypad active on the right or the left. CHORD A 1 THEN 3. Toggles between the keyboard beeping or not beeping. CHORD A 1 THEN 4. Toggles between disabling only the keyboards keys of the pop-up keypad or the entire typing area of the keyboard while the pop-up keypad is active. CHORD A 1 THEN B. Toggles the Hot key and the Stop key On or Off. CHORD A 4. Toggles Caps Scan On or Off. CHORD A 6. Toggles Trailing Characters On or Off. CHORD A 0. Toggles SpellCaps On or Off.

B D. Toggles user-defined autospeaks On or Off. D 7. Toggles Character Echo On or Off. D 8. Toggles Word Echo On or Off. D 9. Toggles Line Echo On or Off. D 0. Toggles Column Browse On or Off. D B. Toggles the flush of text being spoken On or Off. D #. Toggles current selections. D *. Toggles Line Browse On or Off. CHORD D 2. Toggles between one-space and two-space sentence termination. CHORD D C THEN C. Toggles function-key processing On or Off. CHORD 0 8. Toggles Color Scan On or Off.

VIEWPORT AND AUTOSPEAK KEYS

B A. Defines viewport 1 through 9. B B N. Makes viewport n the active viewport (n can be any number from 1 to 9). B B B. Sets the viewport to the full view. B C. Sets the bottom-right corner of the viewport. B D. Toggles user-defined autospeaks On or Off. B D B. Turns off all active autospeaks. B 0. Defines autospeaks 1 through 9. B # N. Announces the screen coordinates of viewport n or autospeak n. 0 D. Moves the pointer to the right edge of the viewport. 0 #. Moves the pointer to the bottom left of the viewport. 0 *. Moves the pointer to the top left of the viewport.

GLOSSARY

A

ACKNOWLEDGE STOP. In Screen Reader/2, a parameter that specifies if the synthesizer sends a control sequence back to Screen Reader/2 to indicate that it has received, and has acted upon, the Screen Reader/2 Stop sequence.

ALWAYS STOP. A Screen Reader/2 parameter that specifies if the synthesizer allows a Stop sequence to be sent even if Not Clear to Send or XOFF has been received.

APPLICATION PROGRAM. A program written for, or by, a user that applies to the user's work, such as a program that does inventory control or word processing.

NOTE: Screen Reader/2 contains profiles that define keypad key sequences customized for use with specific application programs.

ASCII. An acronym standing for American National Standard Code for Information Interchange. The ASCII code is a character set consisting of seven-bit coded characters (eight bits, including parity check). It is used for information interchange among data-processing systems, data-communication systems, and associated equipment. The ASCII set consists of control characters and graphic characters.

NOTE: IBM has defined an extension to the ASCII code (characters 128-255).

ATTRIBUTE. Used here as a display attribute, it is a number that determines how an item should appear on the screen. For example, an attribute could be the color of a screen character or indicate that the Presentation Manager character is italic, bold, or underlined.

AUTOSPEAK. An autospeak monitors values or areas of the screen for change and then announces the change. It is a unique feature of Screen Reader/2 and the Profile Access Language.

B

BAUD RATE. The measure of the transmission rate between a computer and a synthesizer; it is approximately ten times the number of characters transmitted per second.

BROWSE. An edit function, browsing is used primarily for reading. It enables you to hear the character, word, or line the cursor is on, depending on where you move the cursor. If Page Browse is On, a page is read automatically.

BUFFER MANAGEMENT. A Screen Reader/2 synthesizer parameter that enables Screen Reader/2 to wait for a good breaking point in the text before sending a talk command and a "buffer full" string to the synthesizer, leaving room for the Stop command.

C

CHILD WINDOW. A window that is positioned relative to another window (either a main window or another child window). Contrast with parent window.

CHORD. A key sequence that consists of two keypad keys that are pressed at the same time and can be combined with other key presses. An example of a key sequence that includes a chord is CHORD 1 2 THEN B.

CLEAR TO SEND (CTS). In data communications, a term meaning that the protocol between the computer and the communications device is based on hardware.

CODE PAGE. The character display you can select for your system based on the country code. A system can be enabled for two pages, typically 437 (English) and 850 (International). Screen Reader/2 needs to know the code pages to announce the characters correctly.

COLUMN VIEWER. A Screen Reader/2 feature that enables you to read columnar information quickly and easily.

COMMUNICATION PORT (COM PORT). An access point for data entry or exit either to or from a communication device such as your speech synthesizer. A communications port is sometimes called a serial port or serial connector. (COM1, COM2, and COM3 are character-device names reserved for serial ports 1 through 3.)

CONTROL WINDOW. A class of window used to handle a specific kind of user interaction. Radio buttons and check boxes are examples.

CURSOR. A symbol displayed on the screen and associated with an input device. The cursor indicates where input from the device will be placed. Types of cursors include text cursors, graphics cursors, and selection cursors. Contrast with focus and pointer.

D

DEFAULT VALUE. A value used when no value is explicitly specified by the user. For example, the default value for synthesizer volume is 5.

DESKTOP. (1) In P M, a window that displays a list of groups of programs, each of which can be started or stopped. (2) The window, corresponding to the physical device, against which all other types of windows are established.

DICTIONARY. A list of words and replacement strings. Screen Reader/2 uses the dictionary to read words differently from the way the synthesizer would speak them normally.

DIALOG BOX. A type of window that contains one or more controls for the formatted display and entry of data. Also known as a pop-up window.

E

ECHO. An edit function, echoing is used primarily for writing. It repeats (speaks) what you just typed, whether it is a character, word, or line.

ENTRY FIELD. An area on the screen, usually highlighted in some manner, in which users type information.

ENTRY-FIELD CONTROL. The means by which the application receives data entered by the user in an entry field. When it has the input focus, it displays a flashing pointer at the position where the next typed character will go.

F

FIELD. In Screen Reader/2, a contiguous area of the display with the same color or font. It can be one character, several characters, a line, several lines, or an entire window.

FOCUS. The point where keyboard actions will take effect. In OS/2, the focus is usually on the window or control where the cursor is located currently.

FONT. A particular size and style of typeface that contains definitions of character sets, marker sets, and pattern sets.

FORMAT. In Screen Reader/2, any one of five methods of reading information on the screen. These methods are text, pronounce, spell, phonetic, and ASCII.

FULL-SCREEN APPLICATION. An application program that occupies the whole screen.

G

GRAPHIC CHARACTER. In Screen Reader/2, a set of characters with ASCII values from 176 to 223 that are "box" characters-corners, vertical and horizontal lines, tees, crosses, and intersections.

H

HANDSHAKING. For communications with the synthesizer, either Clear to Send, a hardware protocol, or XON/XOFF, a software protocol. Handshaking tells Screen Reader/2 when it can transmit information to the synthesizer. Another word for handshaking is protocol.

I

ICON. A graphical representation of an object consisting of an image and its background. Icons can represent items (such as a document file) with which a user wants to work, and actions that the user wants to perform. In Presentation Manager, icons are used for data objects, system actions, and minimized programs.

INDEXING. The capability of some synthesizers to send markers back through the asynchronous communications channel after each word is spoken. This capability enables the Screen Reader/2 pointer to move to the beginning of each word as it is spoken.

INPUT FOCUS. The area of the screen that will receive input from an input device (typically, the keyboard).

K

KEYPAD. A rectangular piece of equipment with 18 keys that directs Screen Reader/2 to speak text from the screen. The keypad can be attached to a mouse port or to a Screen Reader/2 adapter.

L

LENGTH. In asynchronous communication, the number of "transmit and receive" data bits.

N

NOTEBOOK. A graphical representation of a bound notebook that contains pages separated into sections by tabs. You can select a tab to turn to the section identified by the tab label. A section can contain one or more pages.

NOTEBOOK CONTROLS. A notebook control is used to make changes in an object's settings notebook. These changes take effect immediately. Screen Reader/2 notebook controls include: combination boxes, spin buttons, entry fields, menus, scroll bars, notebooks, buttons, list boxes, title bars, multiple-line entry fields, and static text.

P

PAL. Profile Access Language. A computer programming language that enables you to create or modify profiles for use with Screen Reader/2.

PARENT WINDOW. The window relative to which one or more child windows is positioned. Contrast with child window.

PARITY. In asynchronous communications, maintaining the same level or count. For example, the speech synthesizer and the computer keep the same number of computer ones to perform a check based on an even or odd number for all words.

PHONETIC ALPHABET. An alphabet that represents each character by a word beginning with the same letter. For example, e f g is echo, foxtrot, golf.

PITCH. The parameter that adjusts the frequency; that is, the high or low tone of the synthesizer's voice.

PIXEL. The smallest area of a display screen capable of being addressed and switched between visible and invisible states. Combined together, they constitute an image (as on a computer screen).

POINTER. (1) A Screen Reader/2-unique marking device that is invisible on the screen and moves along as speech commences. It provides a way to move around the screen that is not dependent on cursor movement, thereby allowing full access to the screen. (2) The symbol displayed on the screen that is moved by a pointing device, such as a mouse. The pointer is used to point to items that users can select. Contrast with cursor.

POP-UP KEYPAD. A block of sixteen keys on the keyboard that emulates the main block of sixteen keys on the Screen Reader/2 keypad. The block is arranged four keys by four keys and can be set up on either the left or right side of a keyboard.

POP-UP WINDOW. A window that appears on top of another window in a dialog. Each pop-up window must be completed before returning to the underlying window.

PRESENTATION MANAGER (P M). The visual component of OS/2 that presents, in windows, a graphics-based interface to applications and files installed and running in OS/2.

PROFILE. A file used to control the key definitions and autospeaks for Screen Reader/2. Processing of a profile includes creating, compiling, and loading it.

PROFILE TIER. A stack of profiles. The profile tier can change depending on which program or process is running in the foreground.

PROTOCOL. For communications with the synthesizer, either Clear to Send, a hardware protocol, or XON/XOFF, a software protocol. The protocol tells Screen Reader/2 when it can transmit information to the synthesizer. Another word for protocol is handshaking.

R

RATE. The speed at which a speech synthesizer speaks.

READ REQUEST. Any keypad key press that asks Screen Reader/2 to read information from the screen. These requests can take different forms; for example, read a line, word, or character, or spell a word.

REFRESH. To update a window, with changed information, to its current status.

S

SCROLL BAR. A control window, horizontally or vertically aligned, that allows the user to scroll additional data into an associated panel area.

SCROLLABLE ENTRY FIELD. An entry field larger than the visible field.

SELECTOR. A type of cursor used to indicate the choice or entry field with which a user wants to interact. It is represented by highlighting the item on which it is currently positioned.

SERIAL SYNTHESIZER. An external synthesizer that attaches to the computer through the serial connector (sometimes called COM port or communication port).

SIBLING PROCESSES. Child processes that have the same parent process.

SIBLING WINDOWS. Child windows that have the same parent window.

SLIDER. An area on the scroll bar that indicates the size and position of the visible information in a panel area in relation to the information available. Also known as thumb mark.

SMART TALK. A Screen Reader/2 feature that enables Screen Reader/2 to send a talk command to the synthesizer before the data has all been sent.

STATIC TEXT. Text associated with an OS/2 Presentation Manager control or a group of controls that describes what the control does.

STOP BITS. A signal to a receiving mechanism to wait for the next signal.

STOP DELAY. In Screen Reader/2, a parameter that specifies a delay after you press Stop on the keypad before normal transmission proceeds.

SWITCH. An action that moves the input focus from one area to another. This can be within the same window or from one window to another.

SWITCH LIST. A Screen Reader/2 feature that enables a user to access multiple windows. A keypad key number is assigned to a window, then that key is used to access that window.

T

TEXT WINDOW. Also known as the VIO (video input/output) window.

TIER. Refer to profile tier.

V

VIEW. In OS/2 Presentation Manager, a Screen Reader/2 view is a Presentation Manager window or a text window. In full screen, the Screen Reader/2 view is the screen. In Presentation Manager, the coordinates of a view are relative to the OS/2 Desktop.

VIEWPORT. A rectangular portion of a Screen Reader/2 view. A viewport's coordinates are relative to the current view.

VIO. Video Input/Output.

VOLUME. The loudness with which a speech synthesizer speaks.

W

WINDOW. An area of the screen with visible boundaries within which information is displayed. A window can be smaller than the screen or as large as the screen, and windows can overlap.

WINDOW LIST. The list of programs that are active. The list can be used to switch to a program and to stop programs.

X

XON/XOFF. In data communications, an abbreviation meaning "transmit On, transmit Off." This is a protocol determining how the computer and the device communicate and is based on software.