OS/2, eCS & ArcaOS - Technical > Utilities

graphic interface for smartahci

<< < (3/6) > >>

Andi B.:

--- Quote from: ivan on October 28, 2019, 11:22:18 am ---Hi Andi,
Sorry that doesn't work because it 'sees everything after the -a as more device names and it requires only one device.
....

--- End quote ---
I don't think that's true. Here is what I get -

--- Code: ---{0}[m:\] smartahci -a hd1 | grep -i "temp"
194 Temperature_Celsius     0x0022   111   104   000    Old_age   Always       -       39

{0}[m:\]

{0}[m:\] smartahci
smartctl version 5.37 [i386-pc-ibmvac365] Copyright (C) 2002-8 Bruce Allen
Home page is http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net/

--- End code ---

I guess you've no grep installed. As mentioned above you can use find instead.

--- Code: ---{1025}[m:\] smartahci -a hd1 | find /i "temp"
194 Temperature_Celsius     0x0022   111   104   000    Old_age   Always       -       39
--- End code ---

But the semi-graphic output you posted is from a different program namely smartmon. If you look into the readme you will see this is from

--- Code: ---SMARTMON.EXE is maintained by Andrew Belov <andrew_belov@newmail.ru>.
--- End code ---

Maybe you can convince Andrew to update his program to os2ahci. Or you look into the included source code and try to do it yourself.

Btw. I'm not sure if this version of smartahci was really build by Bruce Allen. I seem to remember David did this version. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

ivan:
Hi Andi,

I have both smartahci and smartctl (smartmontools v6.6 r4424 from hobbes)installed on my test machine.  Both give the same information to the -A command with the difference being that smartahci requires the hd1 disk identifier while smartctl uses ahci1 for ahci drives and hd1 for ide disks.

I have to admit that I like the GUI from smartmon that I grabbed from my old Acer notebook.  As for me trying to modify any program, I don't stand a chance unless it is written in assembler, I am a hardware engineer not programmer.

I know there is a GUI for smartmontools for everything except OS/2 but again the problem is porting it - where would I start?.

 

RickCHodgin:

--- Quote from: ivan on November 01, 2019, 12:41:12 pm ---As for me trying to modify any program, I don't stand a chance unless it is written in assembler, I am a hardware engineer not programmer.
--- End quote ---

Hi Ivan.  Have you ever designed a CPU?

ivan:
Hi Rick,

Not one of the latest ones but I did before the 8080 came out - it was a monster made up of discrete components on a bread board just to show ir could be done.

RickCHodgin:

--- Quote from: ivan on November 01, 2019, 01:57:59 pm ---Hi Rick,

Not one of the latest ones but I did before the 8080 came out - it was a monster made up of discrete components on a bread board just to show ir could be done.

--- End quote ---

There was a movie I saw in the mid-90s called TimeCop.  A somewhat interesting movie, but there was a scene where a designer / visionary was creating his new CPU and you could see the design schematics on the huge floor display.  I remember thinking how neat that was.  Since then I've come across some documentaries I've found interesting:

Fairchild documentary on making transistors
Designer of the 6502
Reconstructing the 6502 from schematics

And of course there's the recent book "But How Do It Know?" made into a video with the Scott CPU:
How a CPU works

I wrote a single-step capable emulator for the Scott CPU. :-)

I've been working on two CPUs of my own.  One is a 40-bit in-order 80386 with several newer instructions.  It's 40-bit because that's 1 TB of data, and I can't imagine a CPU needing more than that, but I can imagine it needing more than 4 GB (32-bit).  It has a few models, the top model of which is four-core, supports a type of hyperthreading I call Love Threading because cores can sacrificially come over and help the other core out on its serial workload, making loop processing faster, for example.  And several other interesting extensions / features.

The other is a radical design I've never seen before.  I call it Inspire.  I hope to have it published by the end of next year.

-----
If you ever want help learning about GUI programming let me know.  I used to program almost entirely in assembly, then later C and C++.  Today I use multiple tools because I recognize that not every job needs to be fast.  At the higher levels you can sometimes do things that are pretty and awesome from a user's point of view, even if they're very inefficient from a hardware point of view.  Sometimes it's about productivity, not efficiency, at least when inefficiency on modern hardware runs far faster than efficiency did on the hardware of a couple decades ago.

I'd like to hear about your CPU project sometime.  PM me or email privately if you wish.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version