OS/2, eCS & ArcaOS - Technical > Setup & Installation

Well ArcaOS 5.0 is probably the last version for me.

<< < (2/13) > >>

Dariusz Piatkowski:
Rich made an excellent point.

I just went through a purchase of a brand spankin' new PC for my son, who is away attending school. Now the machine he was using at home wasn't all that old: Asus Prime X470-Pro, AMD Ryzen7 2700 CPU, Samsung 970 Pro M.2 NVMe drive, etc.

Guess what...now that I have "acquired" that hardware (having easily convinced my son to "upgrade") I absolutely intend to take a shot at moving my OS/2 install into that new world.

Point being, our OS/2 still has some legs left in it...yeah, it'll take a little more care than normal/usual, but results can be achieved and this wouldn't have happened had AN not pursued the changes to AOS they did pursue.

I for one am more excited by what's been delivered over the past 6 months then the stuff I've seen over the last 5 years.

David Kiley:

--- Quote from: Ibrahim Hakeem on May 25, 2021, 03:18:40 pm ---I don't think anyone here's getting worked up, David.
The points you make shows that you don't understand the philosophy behind ArcaOS, much less all that has actually been achieved. None of this is anyone's prerogative to explain to you however and I hope you understand that. Arca OS was never intended to be a competitor to mainstream operating systems, it was designed to serve it's niche of modern OS/2 users and does it remarkably well.

--- End quote ---
Glad to see I didn't ruffle too many feathers :).
Yeah iv'e definitely seen from these responses that there are a lot of people that care about running on modern hardware.
It just seems to me a lot more could be done with the OS if that wasn't the focus, which I guess was my point.

--- Quote from: Ibrahim Hakeem on May 25, 2021, 03:18:40 pm ---OS/2 has always been a 32 bit platform, for the sake of compatibility with the vast majority of the software (and hardware at times) we use, it ought to stay this way. Not to mention the plethora of other issues that would come with a 64 bit release.

--- End quote ---
My understanding, if i'm not wrong, is that based on source code limitations it can't be more than a 32bit os, and that is putting a strain on the future especially in web browsers. But, if the focus is on creating the best emulated environment, then things like the web browser wouldn't be so important and could be let go - since the host would already have a suitable browser.

andreas:
I think AN do well the way they do.
An OS that only works in a virtual box is not really an "OS" anymore.
It would be just an interim solution for its own death.

I agree that the future might be 64bit. But to be honest, for me I don't see any need for 64bit as long as i can do all i need to do with my "old" 32bit system. I am not a programmer and using my pc mainly for writing and organizing office stuff. What I try to say is, that it always depends what you need an OS for and what you expect from it. I really enjoy OS/2 since it is so very comfortable to work with it and i wouldn't want to miss it. And i am really happy that AN is doing a great job to keep it alive as an OS....

ivan:

--- Quote ---I agree that the future might be 64bit. But to be honest, for me I don't see any need for 64bit as long as i can do all i need to do with my "old" 32bit system. I am not a programmer and using my pc mainly for writing and organizing office stuff. What I try to say is, that it always depends what you need an OS for and what you expect from it. I really enjoy OS/2 since it is so very comfortable to work with it and i wouldn't want to miss it. And i am really happy that AN is doing a great job to keep it alive as an OS....
--- End quote ---

As you say a 64 bit version of OS/2 is a dream, I have to ask 'what advantage would a 64 bit OS have over a 32 bit one for everyday usage?'

Like andreas I use OS/2 tor writing and editing of manuscripts, yes, I can do that on one of my Linux boxes but not as easily and it still takes the same length of time.  Also there are times when I see memory problems because the modern motherboards and uefi bios are set up for windows only and don't play well with any other OS - since I will not use windows I have learned to live with those quirks.  Even my MSI B550-A Pro board wit a third gen Ryzen processor runs OS/2(ArcaOS) on the bare metal, just wish MSI had better memory management.

Dariusz Piatkowski:

--- Quote from: ivan on May 26, 2021, 02:45:21 pm ---...As you say a 64 bit version of OS/2 is a dream, I have to ask 'what advantage would a 64 bit OS have over a 32 bit one for everyday usage?'...
--- End quote ---

This comment right here that ivan made is the key point when I look at the future roadmap and the direction I wish to pursue.

For everyday use there really is no 64-bit requirement that I can think of. Sure, maybe if you needed to run a massive database server, or perhaps handled huge data files (OK, sometimes a massive TIFF or JPG file will cause a problem on my machine here, especialy if I already have a few days of runtime on it and the memory has been throughly chewed up), but otherwise, we should be quite alright living in 32-bit world!

Not to take a different direction here with this conversation, but once AN is done getting us the capability to run on new bare-metal I honestly wish they could spent some time on addressing the stuff that always turns out to be the weakness, shared memory...I've got to believe there is a way to technically do "garbage collection" and/or prevent the fragmentation to start off with.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version