Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Olafur Gunnlaugsson

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Internet / Re: os2site.com access
« on: May 29, 2019, 04:32:09 am »
What are the other reasons?

I literally do not know, you should ask Ian why some requests do not get answered.

2
Internet / os2site.com access
« on: May 26, 2019, 03:59:25 am »
The official libc05 is here, (use an OS/2 browser) http://www.os2site.com/sw/dev/gcc/old/libc-0.5.1.exe.

A number of people have for one reason or another no access to os2site.com, so it is not a recommended source

Here is an alternative that does not rely on difficult to get login rights

http://www.museodelcomputer.org/parts/commodore/1541/docs/devil/pub/IBM/OS2/libc_runtime/index.html

3
Internet / Re: Kompozer and/or Nvu
« on: May 26, 2019, 01:15:04 am »
Please note that the dreamland site is occasionally unavailable

4
Internet / Re: Kompozer and/or Nvu
« on: May 26, 2019, 01:06:52 am »
LIBC05.dll is the (15 year old) innotek version of GCC libc, they are usually supplied with the application and you may need to put the subfolder they are in in the LIBPATH

If they are not, you can find them here: http://www.dreamlandbbs.com/gfd/gnudev/gcc322b4.zip

This is the whole compiler but the dll's in there as well, the two dll's can be extracted from the archive and placed anywhere  in the LIBPATH or in the same directory as the program itself. As some old unix and Windows ports rely on these dll's as well, it makes sense to place them in x:\os2\dll so that you do not have to install them again for other old ports.

5
Hardware / Re: M.2 Question
« on: May 25, 2019, 11:24:13 am »
M2 is just an PCIe bus in a different mechanical format, with the addition that it can also be accessed by the SATA controller and USB3 controller. This is different from the similar mSATA in that the latter is an SATA bus standard that uses PCIe like connectors.

i.e mSATA devices are always accessed via the on-board SATA controller and the MB firmware boots from them like it does any other SATA connected drive using SATA/IDE ot AHCI drivers after boot. M.2 cards *may* be accessed by the onboard SATA controller if you have an M.2 SATA SSD card. But note that while these M.2 SATA cards are usually just SATA drives they may also be PCIe devices that have onboard SATA controllers on them, these should be seen by the OS as normal SATA controllers

NVME drives are always seen as a part of the PCIe bus, so you need a driver for the controller on the drive, just like you do for the older PCIe NVME cards. If the BIOS can boot from PCIe (Not all can), it can boot from M.2 NVME, regardless of OS.

You can in fact get 2 different types of M.2 to SATA converters, one is passive and has just two SATA connectors on them and are accessed by the SATA controller, the other is active, has an onboard SATA chip and is accessed via the PCIe bus. (This is useful for Intel SoC's that only have 2 SATA controllers built in)

M.2 can also be accessed by USB3, but this is currently of limited use.

6
Multimedia / Re: SYBA USB Stereo Sound Adapter: Good or bad?
« on: May 24, 2019, 06:54:16 pm »
It should work, it is the same chip as Behringer uses in all their low budget USB units, and I am fairly sure I managed to get one of their UCA-xxx going with the drivers from Lars.

7
Hardware / Re: One Mix 3 and OS/2, eCS or AOS?
« on: May 10, 2019, 06:00:49 pm »
No chance without drivers for NVMe and USB3. As it applies for all "newer" systems, it's questionable how much RAM is recognized.

It has an additional M2 slot that is bootable and can take a sata m2

8
Hardware / Re: Another odd request
« on: April 17, 2019, 12:56:32 am »
Hi Olafur

No idea how it compares with the Logitech "marble mouse" but it works fine on a monitor running at 1920 * 1080 - I know this for sure as otherwise my Mrs would tell me all about it  ;-)

Checking the mouse settings I see that Tracking is cranked up all the way - not the fastest pointer but very acceptable I think, compares well with the identical trackball on my 1280 * 1024 monitor.


Regards

Pete

Cheers, that was helpful

9
Hardware / Re: Another odd request
« on: April 17, 2019, 12:53:24 am »
Have you (or anyone else) used an AM4 or other modern board with NVME M.2 hard drive installed alongside SATA drive? Does the CSM (Bios Emulator) see the NVME  drives?
I've read that we need an NVMe driver, analogous to the AHCI driver, for that.

I do not mean a driver for the OS, but rather that the UEFI BIOS emulator sees it after initial boot so that I can use airboot from the MBR on the SATA to choose the boot partition, rather than having to rely on the Microsoft UEFI OS Switcher, it works with OS/2 with some massaging, but does not hide partitions like airboot does.

10
Hardware / Re: Another odd request
« on: April 16, 2019, 06:51:54 pm »
I could suggest the Logitech M570 which, if shopped for carefully, only costs about half an arm eg https://www.ebay.co.uk/p/Logitech-M570-910-002090-Wireless-Trackball/113893903

It costs more when buying direct from Logitech https://www.logitech.com/en-gb/product/wireless-trackball-m570

I have 2 of these and they are lovely to use *but* on checking the ball size it is not quite as large as you would like at approximately 35mm. Might be worth a look....

Great price for the ebay one, but do you know if it has any better resolution than the Logitech "marble mouse" trackball? On 1600 x 900 screens or higher the marble becomes hopelessly slow in OS/2 and jerky in Win as the software attempts to interpolate ....

11
Hardware / Re: Another odd request
« on: April 16, 2019, 06:46:55 pm »
The SATA connectors are entirely separate from the M2 slots, (see attachment 1) and from what I have been able to find out you can have 2 sata disks and 2 M2 sticks all working together.

Have you (or anyone else) used an AM4 or other modern board with NVME M.2 hard drive installed alongside SATA drive? Does the CSM (Bios Emulator) see the NVME  drives?

I was wondering about this since I dual boot from two different drives, with the OS/2 drive being hidden by airboot when Windows runs and vice versa and was hoping I could do the same with Win on NVME and OS/2 on SATA.

12
Hardware / Re: Another odd request
« on: April 15, 2019, 05:57:32 pm »
Sadly I have not had the opportunity. I did try out this lovely Mini-STX thing below about a week ago, had very limited time in its presence but it appeared to  run ECS 2.1 OK with the UEFI CSM enabled or at the least with only minor problems, sadly no PCIe slot so only VESA graphics ...

https://www.asrock.com/nettop/AMD/DeskMini%20A300%20Series/

13
Applications / Re: nguest2.exe (netop) fails to start
« on: March 29, 2019, 05:34:13 pm »
Hi Alex

If there are no changes to helpmgr.dll what happened to cause the size of the files to be so different?

   2.19.4 has 17-08-05 11:44a 50,132 0 a--- HelpMgr.dll

   2.19.5 has 3-03-19 2:13p 47,937 0 a--- helpmgr.dll


Regards

Pete

Different versions of compilers create different outputs, even though the source stays the same.

14
Hardware / Re: WiFiBlast
« on: March 06, 2019, 06:21:35 pm »
I found this piece of hardware.

https://buywifiblast.com/

It is cheap (approx $35) and has enabled me to use my wireless on my notebook. under ArcaOS.  Can be used as a network adaptor.   Wherever I plug my notebook in, i also plug in the WiFiBlast and then plug a short ethernet cord from it to my notebook,  instead of running 30 feet of ethernet cord.   I set it up under Windows.  It has been working great. 

Note:  the ethernet cable is only around a 1-1/2 foot long.  You may have to replace with a longer cable.  The wireless  initially has to be set up under windows.

The cheap Chinese ones you find on Ebay also work fine for the most part and a number of them allow you to configure them via a browser

15
Programming / Re: Experience with decompilers with OS/2 programs
« on: January 12, 2019, 05:34:09 pm »
Regarding decompiler, I found this:

https://www.hex-rays.com/products/decompiler/

While it only exists as a Windows program, it is still possible that it can decompile an OS/2 executable. It all depends on which object formats it supports. However it is not for free and I cannot say anything about the readability of the generated C/C++ source code.

This used to be a native OS/2 program originally (IDA pro), and is available for the Mac and Linux in addition to Windows. It has excellent OS/2 support still (decompilation that is, it no longer runs on OS/2), but keeps getting more expensive by the year. The starter package is now just under 1000 USD. I had a license at one point but let it lapse due to cost reasons.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10