Author Topic: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS  (Read 498 times)

Martin Vieregg

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 1
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« on: April 22, 2018, 10:29:07 am »
I have managed to install both Windows and ArcaOS on a new computer. But now I have realized that, if you install ArcaOS before installing Windows, Windows changes the partition format of the ArcaOS partition from JFS to NTFS. You can see this in DFSEE. The data partitions are unchanged. Now I have got a JFS partition which is marked as NTFS. Does anyone know how to correct this?

Reinstalling ArcaOS will work, but I hope there is a more easier way. At the moment, I cannot start ArcaOS at all. When starting via ArcaOS USB stick, I see the C: partition, but I get an error message when accessing the data, because OS/2 cannot handle this file system. The Airboot menu OS entries are no more correctly assigned: When selecting ArcaOS, the second Windows installation runs, the first Windows installation is OK and the second Windows entry ends in an error message "no OS found". I know that when reinstalling ArcaOS, the oder problem disappears, too. I made no partition entry backup with DFSEE.

ivan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 26
  • Posts: 752
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2018, 11:11:37 am »
Hi Martin,

I just went through that exercise and found the same as you (win 7).

I ended up using DFSee to make the partitions with the first one on the disk for win 7, then my usual utilities, programs, work and home partitions with ArcaOS boot partition at the end. I also include a win32 partition for transfers between OSs.

Installed win 7 then installed ArcaOS and finally AirBoot.  The fact that ArcaOS boots from H:\ is no problem, just have to remember that, and C:\ is blank, must work out how to hide it.

This is on an ASRock AM1H-ITX board with an AMD 3850 quad core APU.

Martin Vieregg

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 1
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2018, 11:22:37 am »
The order of the partitions is Windows first, too. And anway, I got the problem.

ivan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 26
  • Posts: 752
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2018, 11:51:07 am »
I think the only way to get the two to coexist is to make the partitions with DFSee first with the correct partition types.  This does two things, a) it stops windows messing about with the partitions because it does not 'see' the JFS or HPFS partitions and is therefore restricted to the NTFS partition.  The only drawback is the windows takes the C: partition - I think there is a way of hiding that but can't be bothered finding it. b) it gives you control of your hard disk otherwise windows installer will take over everything.

I don't know about win 10 but with win 7 you need to use the advanced install just to confirm that it is using the correct partition.

Martin Vieregg

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 1
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2018, 02:28:58 pm »
I have realized now that my partition order is:
- Windows 10 32 bit
- ArcaOS
- Windows 10 64 bit

The correct order would be to install both Windows at the beginning, and to place the ArcaOS partiton after all Windows boot partitions.

I made my partions with minilvm, and of course choose a specific partion in the Windows install program.

ivan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 26
  • Posts: 752
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2018, 07:08:16 pm »
Does minilvm allow you to set the partition type?  I have found that any partition you don't want windows to mess with has to be marked as a non windows partition which I why I use DFSee to setup the partitions.

Martin Vieregg

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 1
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2018, 09:41:32 pm »
Where can I set a partition to "non-Windows" in DFSEE? In DFSEE you can change all (expert mode, edit partiton data), but changing only the e.g. format fails, because the other partition data gets influenced. The only way at this point is to save the complete partition data and to restore it. So marking to "non-Windows" would indeed be the best way.

Martin Vieregg

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 1
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2018, 11:18:18 pm »
I have managed now to install two Windows and two ArcaOS (very useful for maintenance) on the same HD. The only rule to sucess is simply not to use primary partitons for ArcaOS, instead I have placed both ArcaOS installations to logical volumes.  Windows does only touch primary partions.

But I do not understand why I cannot reselect these logical partions in the ArcaOS installation program in the case of re-installing ArcaOS. Any idea?

Doug Clark

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 0
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2018, 01:49:25 am »
I don't understand your last question about reselecting logical partitions for reinstalling ArcaOS.

Purchased a used Lenovo T530 loaded with Win7 and installed ArcaOS on the same drive as Win7. Both WIn 7 and ArcaOS2 boot drives/partitions are C: You are right about making the ArcaOS partition(s) logical. [In my case the install was complicated by replacing the hard drive with an SSD.

The final process was:

1) Make DVDs from Win7 recovery partition on the hard drive. The hard drive for a Lenovo laptop comes with a partition at the end which contains the stuff to reinstall/recover the Win7 installation, along with a utility to copy that data to DVDs. It took 5 DVDs to store all the data.

2) Swap the spinning hard drive with the SSD drive.

3) Boot to 1st  recovery DVD and restore Win7 to the SSD.

4) Boot to Win7 and immediately shrink the partition to the smallest it will go and you want it to be. In my case that was 93 GB. Use the "Create and Format Hard Disk Partitions" tool in Win7 under Control Panel, Administrative Tools.

5) I wanted my Windows development tools in a separate partition so I created a new partition (10 GB) in Win7, which became the D: drive in Windows 7.

6)  I booted to the ArcaOS DVD, and on the first screen after the installer started I selected System Management and created  the partitions I wanted. Then exited back to the installer and completed the install.

What didn't work was trying to use a retail copy of Windows 7 to install on the new SSD drive while using the product ID I extracted from the existing Windows on the spinning hard drive.  It installed OK but would not activate using the product ID from the old Win7 installation. I was trying to avoid the process of creating the recovery DVDs, installing from those, and then shrinking the partition.

5)

Doug Bissett

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 39
  • Posts: 1023
    • View Profile
Re: Airboot and installing Windows 10 and ArcaOS
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2018, 07:34:59 am »
Quote
4) Boot to Win7 and immediately shrink the partition to the smallest it will go and you want it to be. In my case that was 93 GB. Use the "Create and Format Hard Disk Partitions" tool in Win7 under Control Panel, Administrative Tools.

Rule #1, when partitioning a disk for OS/2. Do it ALL with OS/2 (the Disk utility in ArcaOS), or there is a very good probability that it will be done wrong (it is next to a miracle if it comes out right). DFSEE can do it, but DFSEE will also do it wrong, unless it is running under OS/2 (the disk utility is a special version of DFSEE, specifically designed to do such things).

You also need to be absolutely sure, that windows (or any other OS that you install) does NOT touch the partitions, or the MBR (some Linux distros will thoroughly mess it up, unless you use some commands to tell it not to - sorry, I don't know the details).