Author Topic: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?  (Read 3837 times)

Ben

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 3
  • Posts: 216
  • Know Thyself
    • View Profile
OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« on: November 22, 2019, 06:07:42 pm »
I have been using Samba to connect my LAN for years now.

However, catering to Samba under the Ubuntu upgrades, (getting the OS/2 machines to continue to see Samba shares hosted by Ubuntu), has been time consuming at a point in my life when I simply do not have the time.

Are there any other options to connect all machines on the LAN, (Windows 7, eCS & Ubuntu), that does not add security risks?

(FTP is not enough).

Paul Smedley

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 24
  • -Receive: 76
  • Posts: 641
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2019, 08:44:45 pm »
Hi Ben,

I have been using Samba to connect my LAN for years now.

However, catering to Samba under the Ubuntu upgrades, (getting the OS/2 machines to continue to see Samba shares hosted by Ubuntu), has been time consuming at a point in my life when I simply do not have the time.

Are there any other options to connect all machines on the LAN, (Windows 7, eCS & Ubuntu), that does not add security risks?

(FTP is not enough).


I'm using ArcaOS to connect to Samba on a daily basis. To do this, you MUST be using a recent build of the Samba client (4.4 or above) that supports SMB2+.

ArcaOS supports this out of the box, but it really isn't that hard to install my builds manually - there are numerous posts here on the subject.

Cheers,

Paul

Sean Casey

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 9
  • -Receive: 6
  • Posts: 81
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2019, 05:34:30 am »
I also use NFS that can be accessed from Linux, Windows and OS/2 clients.  I stream a 1.5TB archive of all my machines each month to an NFS mount on a Linux server.  I have had fewer issues with NFS compared to SMB, and file transfers are much faster with NFS than with SMB.  As a plus, NFS servers utilize trusts and are easier to set up than SMB/CIFS server shares. 

It's nice to have different options :)

Ben

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 3
  • Posts: 216
  • Know Thyself
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2019, 03:17:37 pm »
Thank-you for replying Sean.

I haven't looked into NFS in a long time and I have no memories of ever using it.

When I can clear some time I will do just that.

Any caveats, (or suggestions), that I should be aware of?

Ben

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 3
  • Posts: 216
  • Know Thyself
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2019, 04:32:12 pm »
Hi Ben,

I have been using Samba to connect my LAN for years now.

However, catering to Samba under the Ubuntu upgrades, (getting the OS/2 machines to continue to see Samba shares hosted by Ubuntu), has been time consuming at a point in my life when I simply do not have the time.

Are there any other options to connect all machines on the LAN, (Windows 7, eCS & Ubuntu), that does not add security risks?

(FTP is not enough).


I'm using ArcaOS to connect to Samba on a daily basis. To do this, you MUST be using a recent build of the Samba client (4.4 or above) that supports SMB2+.

ArcaOS supports this out of the box, but it really isn't that hard to install my builds manually - there are numerous posts here on the subject.

Cheers,

Paul

Hello again, Paul, (I solved the BIND problem BTW), I tried using your latest Samba Netdrive plugin to (re)connect, but I did not have any success with it; I kept getting the dreaded 58 error.

I'm thinking that I would have to do a complete Samba upgrade on all of my OS/2 machines to bring them all up to standard. From what I remember of dealing with Samba for OS/2, it was always a pain; maybe that is no longer the case.

However, options are few and whatever I do will probably be chosen because it is the lesser of the evils. Hehehe.

Of course, the biggest concern is that I will spend a lot of time doing that multi-machine upgrade and will still not be able to connect to the Ubuntu, (18.04), shares. OS/2 -> OS/2 has always had good and viable options.

Bernhard Pöttinger

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 8
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2019, 04:33:35 pm »
Hi, another possibility besides SMB, NTFS and FTP (but this is insecure) is SSH (or SFTP). NetDrive provides SFTP plugin and every linux machine speaks ssh. I have used this, for connecting to MacOSX High Sierra, because High Sierra does not have an ftp server anymore and the apple smb is a little bit strange.

regards, Bernhard

Ben

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 3
  • Posts: 216
  • Know Thyself
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2019, 10:34:51 pm »
Hello, Bernhard.

I have thought of using that, but I use Ubuntu as a backup machine and a repository for extensive research files.
The problem with the Netdrive plugin for FTP is that it tends to scan the whole directory tree and that takes a long time, making it unfeasible for a lot of my needs.

My initial plan was to use Ubuntu as a dumb, LAN fileserver and when it's running and fine tuned, it works great... no... it works acceptibly... as that, however, any upgrades to Ubuntu or any part of it, is a risky and time consuming business and hardware failures ensure the eventual need for upgrades.

In addition, once Ubuntu was setup it became very convenient as a quick, light-duty, Internet research tool in my workshop and as such has become indespensible.

I would very quickly dump any version of *nix and use OS/2 exclusively if it could handle the two 4Tb drives.

I wonder... is there any hope of that happening? I understand that this is not possible, but, I've heard such things said before. So, I remain  realistically hopeful.

Dave Yeo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 11
  • -Receive: 190
  • Posts: 2614
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2019, 02:01:55 am »
There are plans to work around the 2TB limit, simplest is to split larger drives into virtual drives so OS/2 would see your 4TB drive as 2 2TB drives. There's a lot of other stuff to do so when and if it'll happen...

Dariusz Piatkowski

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 14
  • -Receive: 17
  • Posts: 752
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2019, 03:55:51 am »
Hi Ben,

...I would very quickly dump any version of *nix and use OS/2 exclusively if it could handle the two 4Tb drives.

I wonder... is there any hope of that happening? I understand that this is not possible, but, I've heard such things said before. So, I remain  realistically hopeful.[/color]

Have you tried building a logical LVM volume from multiple 2T partitions?

I am not sure if this would work (seeing that JFS is maxed at 2T anyways) but if the issue is a mapping to actual hardware vs logical addressability of the filesystem space then the logical LVM volume approach may work.

Sean Casey

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 9
  • -Receive: 6
  • Posts: 81
    • View Profile
Re: OS/2 to Ubuntu: Any options other than Samba?
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2019, 05:04:58 am »

Any caveats, (or suggestions), that I should be aware of?


Hi Ben,

The set up is fairly easy and there are plenty of guides on the Net.  As an example, the following are steps for setting up an NFS server on Linux (using Ubuntu/Debian APT package manager).  This assumes you have defined your hostnames within the hosts file on the Linux and OS/2 clients.

1) Install NFS server:

     sudo apt-get install nfs-kernel-server

2) Create exported share and set up permissions.  I want all groups on client systems to have access. Alternatively, you can grant yourself access:

     sudo mkdir /backup 
     sudo chown nobody:nogroup /backup
     sudo chmod 777 /backup

3) Create your /etc/exports file to define your share and grant access.  This is the only entry I have in the file (the mount point, clients must originate from the specified IP range, security for the mount).  You can have multiple lines in your exports file should you need to specify different access restrictions.

     /backup 199.50.132.* (rw,sync,no_subtree_check,no_root_squash)

4) Export the shared directory:

     sudo exportfs -a

5) Restart the NFS server to activate configuration:

     sudo systemctl restart nfs-kernel-server


Configuring a Linux client machine:

1) Install NFS client:
 
     sudo apt-get install nfs-common

2) Create mount point on client:

     mkdir /mnt/galaxy

3) Mount the NFS share:

     I created the following entry in my /etc/fstab and then issue the mount command.

     //galaxy/backup /mnt/galaxy nfs noauto,nofail,noatime,nolock,intr,tcp,actimeo=1800 0 0

Or you can use the following command to mount the share:
 
     mount galaxy:/backup /mnt/galaxy

Configuring NetDrive for the share from my ArcaOS client Romulan (see attached netdrive.jpg):